How popular is the baby name Gale in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Gale and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Gale.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Gale

Number of Babies Named Gale

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Gale

35 Most Unisex Baby Names in the U.S.

Last month, FlowingData crunched some numbers to come up with the 35 most unisex baby names in the U.S. since 1930. Here’s their list:

  1. Jessie
  2. Marion
  3. Jackie
  4. Alva
  5. Ollie
  6. Jody
  7. Cleo
  8. Kerry
  9. Frankie
  10. Guadalupe
  11. Carey
  12. Tommie
  13. Angel
  14. Hollis
  15. Sammie
  16. Jamie
  17. Kris
  18. Robbie
  19. Tracy
  20. Merrill
  21. Noel
  22. Rene
  23. Johnnie
  24. Ariel
  25. Jan
  26. Devon
  27. Cruz
  28. Michel
  29. Gale
  30. Robin
  31. Dorian
  32. Casey
  33. Dana
  34. Kim**
  35. Shannon

I’m not sure exactly what criteria were used to create the rankings, but it looks like the top unisex names on this list were the top-1,000 names that “stuck around that 50-50 split” the longest from 1930 to 2012.

(In contrast, my unisex baby names page lists any name on the full list to fall within the 25-75 to 75-25 range, but only in the most recent year on record.)

The FlowingData post also mentions that, though the data is pretty noisy, there might be “a mild upward trend” over the years in the number of babies with a unisex name.

**In 1957, Johnny Carson’s 5-year-old son Kim had his name changed to Richard because he’d been having “a little trouble over his name being mistaken for a girl’s.”

Source: The most unisex names in US history

[Update: Changed Michael to Michel, 11/7]


2 Babies Born During Wind Storms, Named Gale

hurricane1.
While an unnamed Category 4 hurricane was pummeling south Florida on September 15, 1945, Lt. and Mrs. Carl Landau (who were staying at a shelter in West Palm Beach) welcomed a baby girl. They named her Karen Gale.

2.
During the gusty Great Appalachian Storm of November 24-25, 1950, Mr. and Mrs. Donald Quinn of Burlington, Vermont, welcomed a baby girl. They named her Gale.

And don’t forget Barbara Gale, named for Hurricane Barbara in 1953.

Sources:

  • “Baby Born in Storm Gets Name of Gale.” Los Angeles Times 17 Sep. 1945: 1.
  • “Named for Storm.” Eugene Register-Guard 12 Dec 1950: 23.
  • “Storm Speeds Toward Georgia, South Carolina Coast.” Sun [Baltimore] 17 Sep. 1945: 1.

Barbara Gale – First Hurricane Baby Name?

hurricaneIn 1950, the United States Weather Bureau started naming Atlantic hurricanes and tropical storms.

The initial names came from a radio alphabet that began Able, Baker, Charlie, Dog, Easy, Fox and George. Because the alphabet happened to include several human names, you could say the first Atlantic storms that were “named” were the Charlies and Georges of 1950-1952.

It wasn’t until three years later that the USWB starting using human names exclusively. In 1953, it replaced the phonetic alphabet with a list of female names. (Male names weren’t thrown into the mix until 1979.)

The first storm with a female name was Tropical Storm Alice, the first storm of the 1953 storm season. I couldn’t find any babies named after Alice, but I did find one named after the second storm, Hurricane Barbara.

Hurricane Barbara traveled up the Eastern seaboard in mid-August. It struck the Outer Banks (islands off the North Carolina coast) on August 13. That night, a baby girl born in New Bern, N.C., to Mr. and Mrs. N. E. Ward was named Barbara Gale.

There were six other named storms (Carol, Dolly, Edna, Florence, Gail and Hazel) that season, but I could only find a namesake for one of them — Florence.

Hurricane Florence struck the Florida panhandle on September 26. Earlier that day, a baby born in Crestview, Florida, to Mr. and Mrs. Curtis Holt was named Sandra Florence.

Since 1953, many more babies — hundreds, probably — have been named for Atlantic hurricanes. Hurricane-inspired baby names I’ve blogged about here include Hazel (1954), Alicia (1983), Elena (1985), Gloria (1985), Andrew (1992) and Isabel (2003).

Sources:

  • “Child Aptly Named.” Los Angeles Times 16 Aug. 1953: 23.
  • “Hurricane Florence Has Tiny Namesake.” Hartford Courant 27 Sep. 1953: 24A.
  • Worldwide Tropical Cyclone Names

Gale Storm Named Baby After TV Character

Singer/actress Gale Storm* had four children–three boys and a girl. Her daughter, born in 1956, was named Susanna after Susanna Pomeroy, the character Gale portrayed on The Gale Storm Show from 1956 to 1960.

*Yes, “Gale Storm” was a stage name. Her real name was Josephine Owaissa Cottle. The middle name, chosen by an older sister, can be traced back to Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s poem “The Song of Hiawatha” (1855):

In the thickets and the meadows
Piped the bluebird, the Owaissa,
On the summit of the lodges
Sang the robin, the Opechee,
In the covert of the pine-trees
Cooed the pigeon, the Omemee;

According to A Concise Dictionary of the Ojibway Indian Language (1903), available at archive.org, Longfellow got the Ojibwe words for robin and pigeon about right, but the word for bluebird sounds more like “ozahwunoo.”

Source: “First Daughter.” Chicago Tribune 13 Nov. 1956: 3.

Did Your Ancestors Immigrate? Ship Names as Baby Names

Many of us have ancestors who traveled by sea. But few of us know the names of the ships that conveyed our ancestors from place to place. That’s too bad, because some of these vessels had names like:

M. F. Elliott
Mabel Gale
Mae
Madeleine Constance
Magda
Maggie Todd
Malcolm Baxter Jr
Manuel Calvo
Marco Minghetti
Margaret May Riley
Margarethe Russ
Margery Austin
Margit Skogland
Maria
Maria Valerie
Mariana
Marie di Giorgio
Marina
Marion G. Douglas
Mariska
Mary G. Maynard
Mary Thomas
Mathilda
Maurice R. Thurlow
Max Horten
Maxwell R
Melania
Melissa Trask
Miguel Jover
Minerva
Mirjam
Mitchell
Monica
Morwenna
Muriel
Myron C. Taylor

All of the above are actual ship names. These particular ships arrived at Ellis Island in the late 1800s and early 1900s. They could inspire some great baby names, couldn’t they?

Of course, performing genealogical research and then combing through passenger manifests is tedious business. And, even then, there’s no guarantee that the ship names you find in your family tree will be appropriate baby names.

But if you do put the time in, you might just discover a name that not only appeals to you, but is symbolic of your family, of overcoming hardship, of starting a new life. A name like that would certainly give your child a cool story to tell one day.

One-Syllable Girl Names – Bree, Hope, Jill, Paige, Tess

Want a baby name that’s short & sweet? Here are over 100 one-syllable girl names:

Anne, Ann
Ayn
Bea
Belle
Bess
Beth
Bjork
Blair, Blaire
Blake, Blayke
Blanche
Bliss
Blythe
Bree, Brie
Britt
Brooke, Brook
Brynn, Bryn, Brynne
Cass
Cate
Claire, Clare, Clair
Dawn
Dee
Dream
Drew, Dru
Elle
Eve
Faith, Fayth
Fawn
Faye, Fay, Fae
Fern
Fleur
Flor
Fran
Gail, Gayle, Gale
Grace, Grayce
Greer
Gwen
Gwyn
Hope
Jade, Jayde, Jaide
Jan
Jane, Jayne
Jean, Jeanne
Jen, Jenn
Jess
Jill
Joan
Joy, Joi, Joie
Joyce
Jude
June
Kai
Kate
Kay, Kaye
Kim
Klaire
Kris
Laine, Lane, Layne
Lark
Leigh, Lee
Liv
Liz
Love
Lux
Luz
Lynn, Lynne, Lyn
Mae, May
Madge
Maeve
Mai
Marge
Maude, Maud
Nelle, Nell
Neve, Niamh
Noor, Nour
Paige, Payge
Pam
Pearl
Queen
Quinn
Rae
Reece, Reese
Rayne, Rain, Raine
Reem
Rose
Rue
Ruth
Sage, Saige
Scout
Shea, Shae, Shay
Skye, Sky
Sloane, Sloan
Sol
Star, Starr
Sue
Tea
Tess
Trish
True, Tru
Wren

See any you like?

P.S. Here are the most popular 1-syllable girl names of 2012, 2011 and 2010.