How popular is the baby name Grace in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Grace and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Grace.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Grace

Number of Babies Named Grace

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Grace

Popular Baby Names in Northern Ireland, 2017

According to the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA), the most popular baby names in Northern Ireland in 2017 were Emily and James.

Here are the Northern Ireland’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2017:

Girl Names
1. Emily, 216 baby girls
2. Grace, 202
3. Olivia, 179
4. Isla, 153
5. Anna, 142
6. Sophie, 132
7. Ella, 128
8. Amelia, 127
9. Charlotte, 124
10. Sophia, 121

Boy Names
1. James, 243 baby boys
2. Jack, 226
3. Noah, 189
4. Charlie, 185
5. Jacob, 180
6. Harry, 169
7. Thomas, 158
8. Daniel, 147
9. Oliver, 143
10. Logan, 125

In the girls’ top ten, Isla and Charlotte replace Lily and Ava.

In the boys’ top ten, Thomas and Logan replace Matthew and Alfie.

The top two names, Emily and James, were the same in 2016.

In the adjacent Republic of Ireland, the top names of 2017 were Emily and Jack.

Sources: Baby Names – NISRA, Top 10 baby names in Northern Ireland

Popular Baby Names in New South Wales, 2017

According to data released NSW Registry of Births, Deaths & Marriages, the most popular baby names in New South Wales, Australia, in 2017 were Charlotte and Oliver.

Here are NSW’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2017:

Girl Names
1. Charlotte, 482 baby girls
2. Olivia, 463
3. Ava, 379
4. Amelia, 374
5. Mia, 338
6. Isla, 329
7. Chloe, 301
8. Zoe, 295
9. Ella, 291
10. Grace, 285

Boy Names
1. Oliver, 556 baby boys
2. William, 456
3. Noah, 432
4. Jack, 398
5. Henry, 336
6. James, 335
7. Thomas, 330
8. Lucas, 325
9. Ethan, 302
10. Alexander, 296

In the girls’ top 10, Zoe and Ella replace Emily (now 14th) and Ruby (now 15th).

In the boys’ top 10, Henry replaces Leo (now 13th).

In 2016, the top two names were Olivia and Oliver.

And to follow up on the Maddison/Madison thing from last year: Maddison is now ranked 61st in NSW, while Maddison is ranked 76th. In the U.S., in contrast, the double-D version is 357th and the single-D version ranks 17th.

Source: Facts & Statistics – Registry of Births, Deaths & Marriages – Department of Justice NSW

The Names of the Seven Sutherland Sisters

seven sutherland sisters

The Seven Sutherland Sisters of New York had 37 feet of hair between them. By the time they joined the Barnum and Bailey Circus in the mid-1880s, they were already celebrities. They were also growing rich thanks to the sale of their pricey “Seven Sutherland Sisters” hair grower tonic.

The names of the seven sisters? Sarah, Victoria, Isabella, Grace, Naomi, Dora, and Mary. Sarah had the shortest hair (3 feet) and Victoria had the longest (7 feet).

Which of their names do you like best?

Which "Sutherland sister" name do you like best?

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Source: Untangling the Tale of the Seven Sutherland Sisters and Their 37 Feet of Hair

Popular Baby Names in Tasmania, 2017

According to the Tasmanian Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, the most popular baby names in Tasmania in 2016 were Charlotte and Oliver.

Here are Tasmania’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2017:

Girl Names
1. Charlotte
2. Evie
3. Ava
4. Isla
5. Mia
6. Sophie
7. Ruby
8. Olivia
9. Matilda
10. Evelyn

Boy Names
1. Oliver
2. Jack
3. Henry
4. William
5. Noah
6. Charlie
7. Hunter
8. Thomas
9. Oscar
10. Max

In the girls’ top 10, Ruby, Olivia, and Evelyn replace Grace, Lucy, and Amelia.

In the boys’ top 10, Henry, Hunter, Oscar, and Max replace Logan, James, Mason, and George.

In 2016, the top names were the same.

Source: Tasmanian Top Baby Names

Searching for “Glen Eden”

Atlas Obscura recently published an article about a man named Glen Eden Einbinder who has been collecting things bearing his first and middle names for more than 25 years.

His collection consists of “Glen Eden” postcards, bottle tops, newspaper clippings, leaflets, photographs, drink coasters, clothing, and more. The items represent various places: the Glen Eden nudist resort in California, the Glen Eden wool company in Georgia, the Glen Eden summer camp in Wisconsin, etc.

Though the two [names] together conjure up some pleasant idyll–Glen as a woodland valley, Eden as a garden–he didn’t realize the connection until he started to come across the huge volume of places that share his name.

Reader Becca pointed me to the article (thank you, Becca!) and asked about other people with this specific first-middle combo.

According to SSA data, at least 125,035 U.S. baby boys (and 1,348 U.S. baby girls) have been named single-N-Glen since 1880. So how many of these American single-N-Glens have the middle name Eden (besides Glen Eden Einbinder)?

A handful do, though I could only find definitive proof of two of them:

  • Glen Eden Hawkes (1907-1979) of Idaho
  • Glen Eden Franklin (b. 1918) of North Carolina

I also found several international Glen Edens, like these two:

  • Glen Eden Davis (1925-2003) of New South Wales, Australia
  • Glen Eden Flintoff (b. 1898) of Ontario, Canada

And there were plenty of near-misses. I found people named double-N-Glenn Eden (example), first-last Glen Eden (example), and first-last double-N-Glenn Eden (example). Plus people with first names like Gleneden, Glenedene, and Glenedena (example).

And how was Glen Eden Einbinder himself named?

Glen…is somehow related to the initials of his ancestors, with the “G” perhaps coming from a Great-Aunt Gussie. And Eden comes from the Jack London book Martin Eden, which his father was reading when Einbinder was born.

Do you have any thoughts on the combo “Glen Eden”?

P.S. This article reminded me of a documentary called The Grace Lee Project, in which an Asian-American filmmaker named Grace Lee interviews a bunch of other Asian-American women also named Grace Lee. (I think I first heard about it via Nancy Friedman.)