How popular is the baby name Greg in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Greg and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Greg.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Greg

Number of Babies Named Greg

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Greg

Name Quotes for the Weekend #32

Thana, cover of LIFE, 1947

Happy Friday! Here’s another batch of random, name-related quotes to end the week…

From the description of the December 15, 1947, cover of LIFE magazine:

Among the prettiest showgirls in New York’s nightclubs are (from left) brunette Dawn McInerney, red-haired Thana Barclay and blond Joy Skylar who all work in the Latin Quarter. […] Thana, also 22, was named after her mother’s favorite poem Thanatopsis. She is married to a song plugger named Duke Niles and owns a dachshund named Bagel.

The poem “Thanatopsis” was written by William Cullen Bryant. The word itself means “a view or contemplation of death.” In Greek mythology, Thanatos was the god of death.

From the All Music Guide to Hip-hop by Vladimir Bogdanov:

Ginuwine was born in Washington, D.C., on October 15, 1975, with the unlikely name of Elgin Baylor Lumpkin (after D.C.-born Basketball Hall of Famer Elgin Baylor).

Elgin Baylor, born in 1934, was named after the Elgin National Watch Company. (He’s on my Long List of Unusual Real Names.)

From “The Art Of Knowing When Less Is More” by Greg Dawson, published in the Orlando Sentinel in 1997:

Fellow immigrants…Here is proof that we need that national “conversation about race” urged by President Clinton: Last week in a whimsical moment I argued that official hurricane names are too “white bread” (like Greg) and don’t reflect America’s ethnic stew. To make my point I looked at the births page of the Sentinel for names that you never see attached to a hurricane — names such as Attaliah, Desjambra, Ofori. A reader called to complain about the “white bread” line and added, “A lot of those names aren’t even American.”

“Excuse me,” I said, “but they were born in this country. They’re just as American as you and me.”

“You know what I mean,” he said.

Yes, unfortunately, I think I do.

From The Making of Cabaret by Keith Garebian, regarding the name of English actress Valerie Jill Haworth, who was born on Victory over Japan Day (Aug. 15, 1945):

The initials of her baptismal names (Valerie Jill) were in honor of her birth on VJ Day.

Related: American actress Robin Vee Strasser was born on Victory in Europe Day.

A quote from Freddie Prinze, Jr., in the documentary Misery Loves Comedy (sent to me by Anna of Waltzing More Than Matilda):

“When you’re a Junior you’re pretty much just a statue to what went before.”

From “My Daughter Will Be Named Ruby Daffodil” in US magazine article

Back when Drew Barrymore was only 20 years old, she already had a name picked out for her future child.

During an interview with Rolling Stone in June 1995, Barrymore opened up about her relationship at the time with Hole musician Eric Erlandson.

[…]

“I never thought I’d have a sense of family until I had my own kids. I want two: a boy and a girl,” she revealed. “My daughter will be named Ruby Daffodil.”

Today she has two daughters, neither of whom are named Ruby Daffodil. The first was named Olive and the second Frankie.

From “The History Of How “Cow Poop” Became A Real-Life Japanese Family Name” by Mami of the blog Tofugu:

There are some Japanese family names that are so ridiculous that I’m forced to believe that someone was playing some kind of horrible family prank when they named themselves. Cow Poop (Ushikuso), Horse-Butt (Umajiri), and Boar-Crotch (Inomata/Imata) are actual people in Japan. If they wanted a memorable name, they’ve certainly achieved it, but I can’t imagine what it’s like to grow up with a name like that as a child.

From the “Name Wisely” section of “8 Tips for Creating Great Stories” by Hugh Hart of Fast Company:

Fantasy novelist Neil Gaiman stresses the importance of a good name in describing the genesis of his American Gods protagonist. “There’s a magic to names, after all,” he says. “I knew his name [needed to be] descriptive. I tried calling him Lazy, but he didn’t seem to like that, and I called him Jack, and he didn’t like that any better. I took to trying every name I ran into on him for size, and he looked back at me from somewhere in my head unimpressed every time. It was like trying to name Rumpelstiltskin.”

He finally discovered the name, Shadow, in an Elvis Costello song. (American Gods will be on TV soon…will we soon be seeing more babies named Shadow?)


Interesting Baby Name Analysis

I only recently noticed that Behind the Name, one of my favorite websites for baby name definitions, has a page called United States Popularity Analysis — a “computer-created analysis of the United States top 1000 names for the period 1880 to 2012.”

The page has some interesting top ten lists. Here are three of them:

Most Volatile

Boy Names Girl Names
1. Elvis
2. Brooks
3. Santiago
4. Lincoln
5. Ernie
6. Wyatt
7. Quincy
8. Rogers
9. Alec
10. Dexter
1. Juliet
2. Lea
3. Justine
4. Martina
5. Felicia
6. Delilah
7. Selina
8. Lonnie
9. Magdalena
10. Katy

Biggest Recoveries

Boy Names Girl Names
1. Silas
2. Isaiah
3. Caleb
4. Emmett
5. Jordan
6. Josiah
7. Harrison
8. Ezra
9. Jason
10. Jesus
1. Ella
2. Stella
3. Sadie
4. Sophie
5. Isabella
6. Lily
7. Hannah
8. Isabelle
9. Sophia
10. Lilly

Biggest Flash-in-the-Pans

Boy Names Girl Names
1. Dewey
2. Woodrow
3. Dale
4. Barry
5. Rick
6. Greg
7. Roosevelt
8. Shannon
9. Kim
10. Darrin
1. Debra
2. Lori
3. Tammy
4. Pamela
5. Tracy
6. Cheryl
7. Beverly
8. Dawn
9. Diane
10. Kathy

I wonder what the formulas were. I’d love to try the same analysis on the SSA’s full list, using raw numbers instead of rankings. Wonder how much overlap there’d be…

Baby Girls Named Jeopardy in 1983

This one confused me for a while:

  • 1984: unlisted
  • 1983: 6 baby girls name Jeopardy [debut]
  • 1982: unlisted

Jeopardy was a one-hit wonder on the SSA’s baby name list in 1983.

My first (and only) guess was the popular quiz show Jeopardy, but the show began airing in the mid-1960s, so that probably wasn’t it.

Then, a week or two ago, I heard what I think is the answer on an ’80s radio station. It was a tune called “Jeopardy” by The Greg Kihn Band.

“Jeopardy” was apparently one of the top songs in the nation in early 1983. I’d never have guessed it by the bizarre music video.

Baby Name Stories – Ryan, Ryann and Gregory Named for Doctor

During an ultrasound, Wendy and Joe Votto of Toronto discovered that their twin boys had twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome. Days later, doctors at Mount Sinai Hospital performed risky laser surgery inside Wendy’s womb. The surgery was successful, and the twins were born in February 2000.

One twin, Ryan Oliver, was named after Dr. Greg Ryan, a Maternal-Fetal Medicine specialist at Mount Sinai. The other twin, Paul Gregory, seems to have been named in honor of Dr. Ryan as well.

And the namesakes don’t stop there.

Sandy and Jason Clark’s twin girls also had TTTS. Sandy underwent the same procedure at Mount Sinai. When the girls were born in March 2007, they were named Reagan and Ryann.

An anonymous commenter at RateMDs.com had this to say about Dr. Ryan in 2009:

This amazing man saved our surviving twin’s life. Diagnoses with TTTS at 23 weeks, we were rushed to Toronto and had surgery within 18 hours. […] We named our boys after him, to honor this amazing life saver!

Makes me wonder how many babies have been named after Dr. Greg Ryan over the years.

Sources: Dr. Greg Ryan: Making Medical History, Laser surgery performed on twins in utero, RateMDs.com, Toronto Star

Baby Name Needed – Boy Name for Adalaide’s Little Brother

A reader named Abby is expecting a baby boy at the end of the year, and she’d like some helping coming up with his name. She writes:

His sister’s name is Adalaide Joy Foley* and we would like to use the middle name Bernard in honor of his grandfather who is no longer with us.

Abby also mentions that she likes names that are easily shortened. (Adalaide goes by the nickname Ada, for instance.)

Here’s what I came up with:

Anthony (Tony)
Clement (Clem)
Dominic (Dom, Nic)
Emmanuel (Manny)
Frederick (Fred, Rick)
Gabriel (Gabe)
Gregory (Greg)
Jonathan (Jon)
Joseph (Joe)
Lawrence (Larry)
Louis (Lou)
Matthew (Matt)
Maximilian (Max)
Nathaniel (Nate)
Nicholas (Nick)
Oliver (Ollie)
Roderick (Rod, Rick)
Samuel (Sam)
Solomon (Sol)
Stanley (Stan)
Thaddeus (Thad)
Theodore (Ted, Theo)
Thomas (Tom)
Timothy (Tim)
Tobias (Toby)
Walter (Walt)
William (Will, Bill)
Zachary (Zach)

Do you think any of these go particularly well with Bernard? What other names would you suggest to Abby?

*The actual surname is not Foley, but it’s similar.

Update – The baby is here! Scroll down to see which name Abby chose.

Name of the Day – Junko

Tonight, over dinner, we caught part of a steel drum concert featuring Greg and Junko MacDonald.

Junko (pronounced JOON-ko) is originally from Tokyo and is “the world’s first professional female Japanese pan player,” according to the MacDonalds’ website.

There’s no way to tell what Junko’s name means without knowing which characters she uses to write “Jun” in Japanese, but possibilities include “obedient child,” “pure child” and “honest child.”

Hawaii Posts: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7