How popular is the baby name Hanna in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Hanna and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Hanna.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Hanna

Number of Babies Named Hanna

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Hanna

Name Quotes #67: Amandla, Aston, Raon

It’s the first batch of name quotes for 2019!

Here’s how writer Elamin Abdelmahmoud chose a name for his daughter (found via Emily of Nothing Like a Name):

Your middle name, Eliot, is because of T.S. and because of George and because it’s a writer’s name, soft and scholarly. But I would be remiss if I didn’t tell you the other secret function of it: it’s an escape hatch, too, from Amna. Maybe “Amna” could be a burden, we thought. Maybe one day you’d tire of answering, “Amna’s a different name–where is it from?” And if that day comes, we wanted you to have options.

You may have noticed, though, that you don’t have a safety parachute from your last name. It’s long, and it’s bulky, and it can’t be ignored. That’s also by design–my clunky gift to you.

I wanted you to have my last name. And I wanted it to be a burden.

About name discrimination in hiring:

The best approach? Blind hiring. Masking names in the first instance “would remove [bias] at least at the early stages,” [Rupa] Banerjee says, noting that many British firms have tried blind hiring with great success in recent years. In Canada, blind hiring is rare, but it has been proposed by a member of Parliament for use at the federal level.

[…]

So should applicants change their names to boost their chances? Absolutely not, researchers say. “That’s not the message that we’re trying put out there,” Banerjee stresses. The onus, she says, needs to be on employers to understand that such bias exists and to address it internally.

About Indian sociologist Irawati Karve:

Hailing from Maharashtra, Irawati Karve (née Karmarkar) was born into a cultural context that prized education above all else, and had the means to acquire it. Her father was working as an engineer in Burma, when she was born. She was named after the Irrawaddy river of Burma. Her unique name was perhaps a premonition of the continued global heritage of her life and the diversity of her work has entailed.

How Amandla Stenberg was named:

Actress Amandla Stenberg was named after a 1989 Miles Davis album — a lush, African-tinged funk fusion that takes its name from the Zulu and Xhosa word for “power.”

In South Africa under apartheid, “amandla” was — and still is — a rallying cry against oppression. It’s a lot for Stenberg to live up to.

“You think?” she asks, laughing and thanking her mother for the heavy responsibility. Then she turns more serious. “It’s something I keep very close to my heart.”

How Lewis and Clark chose names for things:

One of Lewis and Clark’s primary methods for creating new terms was naming animals or plants according to some salient feature, whether physical, behavioral, or otherwise. The explorers noticed “a curious kind of deer,” in Clark’s words, “its ears large and long,” that was obviously different from eastern deer. Lewis explains in his journal how they chose a name for it: “The ear and tail of this animal … so well comported with those of the mule … that we have … adapted the appellation of the mule deer.” Lewis called a small swan that he spotted along the Pacific coast the whistling swan because it made “a kind of whistling sound.”

How columnist Richard Ord chose a middle name for his son:

His great grandad on his mother’s side was called Aston, so my wife told me, and so that became his middle name.

It wasn’t until a few months after his birth that my wife’s dad asked me about where the name came from.

Surprised, I told him that he took the family name of Aston. “You know, after his great grandad?!”

“Oh,” he replied. “But that wasn’t his name. That was his nickname. His mates called him Aston because he was the only Aston Villa supporter in the West End of Newcastle!”

In my book that makes his middle name even better.

About masculinity and baby names:

What a shame boys aren’t named after admirable qualities, like Grace, or emotions, like Joy, or precious jewels, like Jade!

[…]

In embracing the idea that there might be a range of genders, and that body parts do not in themselves constitute gender identity, millennials have displayed a healthy disregard for traditional roles and expectations. I’m betting the generation which follows might create even more fluid boundaries, and it will all begin with their names.

About a Connecticut coffee shop owned by married couple Do Kim and Hanna Park:

RaonJena Coffee and Dessert, located in the Glen Lochen plaza at 39 New London Turnpike, was named after the couple’s twin 3-year-old daughters (they also have a 7-year-old girl) Raon and Jena, and the Korean name also translates to “happy us” or “happy family.”

For more quotes, check out the name quotes category.

Popular Baby Names in Austria, 2017

According to Statistics Austria, the most popular baby names in the country in 2017 were Anna and Maximilian.

Here are Austria’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2017:

Girl Names
1. Anna, 949 baby girls
2. Emma, 825
3. Marie, 674
4. Lena, 665
5. Laura, 656
6. Sophia, 649
7. Emilia, 618
8. Mia, 574
9. Sophie, 560
10. Johanna, 553

Boy Names
1. Maximilian, 908 baby boys
2. Paul, 814
3. David, 798
4. Elias, 783 (tie)
4. Jakob, 783 (tie)
6. Lukas, 760
7. Felix, 747
8. Alexander, 742
9. Tobias, 741
10. Jonas, 726

In 2016, Austria’s top two names were Anna and David.

Austria also puts out a set of rankings that combines names with the same etymological roots. On that list, the top name groups were:

  • “Anna” (Ana, Ann, Anna, Anne, Annè, Chana, Channa, Haina, Hana, Hanah, Hanna, Hannah, Hanne, Hena, Iana, Jaana, Jana, Janah, Jannah, Yahna, Yana), and
  • “Lukas” (Luc, Luca, Lucas, Lúcás, Lucca, Luka, Lukas, Lukás, Lukáš, Lukasz, Łukasz, Luke).

Source: Anna und Maximilian waren 2017 die beliebtesten Babynamen

Popular Baby Names in Germany 2017

According to the Gesellschaft für deutsche Sprache (Association for German Language), the most popular baby names in Germany in 2017 were Emma and Ben.

Here are the country’s top 10 girl names and boy names of 2017:

Girl Names
1. Emma
2. Sophia/Sofia
3. Hanna/Hannah
4. Emilia
5. Mia
6. Anna
7. Lina
8. Mila
9. Klara/Clara
10. Marie

Boy Names
1. Ben
2. Paul
3. Noah/Noa
4. Leon
5. Jonas
6. Felix
7. Elias
8. Louis/Luis
9. Luke/Lucas
10. Maximilian

In the girls’ top ten, Klara/Clara and Lina replace Lea/Leah and Lena.

In the boys’ top ten, Felix replaces Finn.

According to name researcher Knud Bielefeld, fast-rising names in Germany include boy names Theo, Matteo and Henry and girl names Leni, Ella and Juna.

In 2016, the top baby names in Germany were Sophia/Sofia and Jonas.

Sources: Ausführliche Auswertung: Vornamen 2017, Ben and Emma most popular baby names in 2017

Popular Baby Names in Poland, 2016

According to data released by the government of Poland, the most popular baby names in the country in 2016 were Zuzanna and Antoni.

Here are Poland’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Zuzanna, 8,837 baby girls
2. Julia, 8,637
3. Lena, 8,367
4. Maja, 8,303
5. Hanna, 7,948
6. Zofia, 7,702
7. Amelia, 6,598
8. Alicja, 5,692
9. Aleksandra, 5,428
10. Natalia, 4,809

Boy Names
1. Antoni, 9,183 baby boys
2. Jakub, 8,942
3. Szymon, 8,264
4. Jan, 7,584
5. Filip, 6,674
6. Franciszek, 6,551
7. Mikołaj, 6,380
8. Aleksander, 6,248
9. Kacper, 5,995
10. Wojciech, 5,915

Each of these lists include the same 10 names as the year before, but in slightly different order. (The #1 names in 2015 were Zuzanna and Jakub.)

Here are the top baby names in Warsaw in 2015, and the top baby names in Poland in 2013.

Source: Data for 2016 – Ministry of Digitization (found via Maybe it is Daijiro)

Popular Baby Names in Hungary, 2016

According to data from the Hungary’s Ministry of the Interior (Belügyminisztérium), the most popular baby names in Hungary in 2016 were Hanna and Bence.

Here are Hungary’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Hanna, 1,669 baby girls
2. Anna, 1,206
3. Jázmin, 866
4. Zsófia, 856
5. Zoé, 833
6. Lili, 764
7. Boglárka, 762 – Boglárka is Hungarian for “buttercup.”
8. Luca, 760
9. Emma, 742
10. Léna, 697

Boy Names
1. Bence, 1,800 baby boys – Bence is a form of Vincent.
2. Máté, 1,321
3. Levente, 1,280 – Levente might be based on the Hungarian verb lesz, meaning “will be.”
4. Dominik, 1,173
5. Marcell, 1,146
6. Dávid, 1,123
7. Ádám, 1,117
8. Noel, 1,071
9. Dániel, 1,054
10. Milán, 1,037

In the girls’ top 10, Léna replaces Nóra. In the boys’ top 10, Noel replaces Áron. (Interestingly, the two “replaced” names — if we ignore diacritical marks — are anagrams of one another. They’re palindromic, in fact.)

And how is the name Attila faring in Hungary these days? Here’s the data for the last few years:

  • 2016: Attila ranked 27th (569 baby boys)
  • 2015: Attila ranked 25th (568 baby boys)
  • 2014: Attila ranked 26th (560 baby boys)
  • 2013: Attila ranked 26th (552 baby boys)

Source: Statistics – Hungary’s Deputy State Secretariat for the Administration of the Ministry of the Interior (via Maybe It Is Daijiro)