How popular is the baby name Happy in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Happy and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Happy.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Happy

Number of Babies Named Happy

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Happy

Andy Go To School

First there was Fussy Gotobed, now there’s Andy Go To School!

Andy Go To School, Indonesia

Indonesian police officer Andy Go To School was born on the island of Java. He’s the second of three boys.

The first boy arrived on the first day of 1979 and was named Happy New Year — a phrase his father had heard the English-speaking tourists using.

As a young boy, Happy New Year did not enjoy school. In fact, he’d often run away to avoid attending.

So when his brother was born in 1986, their father chose the name Andy Go To School, hoping that this second son would be a more diligent student than the first.

And we was one…though he frequently misbehaved. Perhaps because the other students often teased him, calling him “Andy Go To Hell.”

So when the third baby boy arrived in 1990, their father chose the name Rudi A Good Boy, hoping that this last son would be better behaved than the first two.

In his own family, Andy Go To School has continued the tradition of bestowing English words as names, calling his two sons Virgenio Silvero Goes To Paradise and Lucky Star Beloved Mother.

Sources: Kisah di Balik Pemberian Nama Happy New Year, Andy Go To School, dan Rudy A Good Boy, What’s in a name? Let’s ask Indonesian police officer Andy Go To School
Image: © Jawa Pos Group


Popular Baby Names in Quebec, 2015

According to data from Retraite Québec, the most popular baby names in Quebec in 2015 were Emma and Thomas/William (tied).

Here are the province’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2015:

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Emma, 615 baby girls
2. Léa, 535
3. Olivia, 475
4. Alice, 471
5. Florence, 460
6. Zoe, 429
7. Chloe, 398
8. Beatrice, 390
9. Charlotte, 381
10. Rosalie, 350
1. Thomas, 754 baby boys
2. William, 754 baby boys
3. Jacob, 663
4. Liam, 661
5. Félix, 638
6. Nathan, 630
7. Samuel, 583
8. Logan, 576
9. Alexis, 554
10. Noah, 537

In 2015, Emma replaced Lea as the top girl name, William joined Thomas as the top boy name, Beatrice replaced Charlie in the girls’ top 10, and Noah replaced Olivier in the boy’s top 10. (Here are the 2014 rankings.)

Of all 9,096 girl names on Quebec’s list in 2015, 74.5% of them were used a single time. Here are some of the unique girl names:

  • Allegresse – the French word allégresse means “joy, elation.”
  • Angelhephzibah
  • Brightness
  • Cathalaya-Skuessi
  • Clerilda
  • Confiance – the French word confiance means “confidence, trust.”
  • Doxalyah
  • Etky
  • Eubenice
  • Evlly
  • Exaucee – the French verb exaucer means “to grant a wish.”
  • Flory Comfort
  • Garance – the French word garance refers to a shade of red created from the root of the madder plant.
  • Glad Marie
  • Glody
  • Graytchelle Mayssa – a Gretchen + Rachel smoosh?
  • Greasy-Elizabeth
  • Happy Moussoni
  • Janiphee
  • Kalliah
  • Kzy
  • Luneve – reminds me of Leneve.
  • M Mah Bourgeois
  • Mingolou Oracle-Kidj
  • Nebraska
  • Nina-Symone
  • Nomad
  • Paphaelle – typo?
  • Poema
  • Praise Peter
  • Protegee
  • Relilah – typo?
  • Shamash-Cleodaine
  • Skodrina
  • Symphony Melody
  • Uqittuk
  • Uri Wonder
  • Winola – this one reminds me of early 20th-century America.
  • Zoalie
  • Zhya

Of all 7,920 boy names on Quebec’s list in 2015, 76.5% of them were bestowed just once. Here are some of the unique boy names:

  • Anakyn
  • Appamatta – the Pali word appamatta means “diligent, careful.”
  • Aunix
  • Axeliam
  • Bleart
  • Bradley Prague
  • Brady Bullet – this one reminds me of modern America (e.g. Shooter, Trigger).
  • Cedrick Wolynsky
  • Chrysolithe – a type of gem (a.k.a. peridot).
  • Cirrus
  • Dejgaard
  • Diamond-Heliodor – two more gems.
  • Drake Luke
  • Dublin
  • Dugaillekens
  • Elliottt – the only triple T’s in the U.S. data so far are Mattthew and Britttany. Probably typos, but you never know.
  • Eviee
  • Exauce – the masculine form of Exaucee.
  • Ezzeldeen
  • Garnet – another gem.
  • Glovacky
  • Gningnery Yoshua
  • Hervenslaire
  • Icky Neymar
  • Iola Stevie
  • Jimmy Johnny
  • Jyceton
  • Jyfr
  • Kbees
  • Keylord
  • Ludo-Vyck
  • Mathis-Adorable
  • Messy
  • Michael Antares – reminds me of an earlier Antares.
  • Napesis – the Cree word napesis means “boy” or “little boy.”
  • Nyquist
  • Perlcy
  • Rowdy Chance
  • Skogen
  • Sosereyvatanack
  • Tysaiah Jay
  • Whidjley Densly
  • Woobs Therly
  • Zogan

For more sets of rankings, check out the name rankings category.

Source: Retraite Québec – List of Baby Names

It’s Christmas, so…Happy Thanksgiving!

I didn’t see this in time to post it on Thanksgiving, so I’ll post it on Christmas instead.

A month ago, Richard Chin of the Pioneer Press interviewed Minnesotans with holiday-inspired names. Most of the names were Christmas-related (Christmas Eve, Mary Christmas, Merry Eve) but the one that caught my eye was Happy Thanksgiving.

How did Dr. Happy Thanksgiving Reynolds, a Minneapolis woman born in 1970, come by her unusual name?

“I was the child of hippies,” Reynolds said. And not just the occasional bell-bottom, bead-wearing hippies, according to Reynolds. They were a hard-core, tofu-making, co-op founding couple who didn’t have a name picked out for their new baby because they believed in letting the universe help choose the name on the day of her birth.

“It was total universe magic time for them,” Reynolds said.

So when the day happened to be Thanksgiving, the universe seemed to be deciding that Reynolds’ first and middle names should be Happy Thanksgiving. The first snowfall of the season also occurred that day, Reynolds said.

“I narrowly missed the name Snow,” she said.

How does Happy Thanksgiving like her name?

Reynolds said her name has been an “unintentional gift.”

She isn’t shy about using her full name in her professional life. After medical school, “I said, ‘You know what, I’m Dr. Happy Thanksgiving Reynolds.’ That’s just who I am.”

She’s gotten job interviews because people want to meet someone named Happy Thanksgiving. “I’m someone you’re not going to forget based on the name,” she said.

I’ve found other people named Thanksgiving — one went by the cute nickname Givie — but Reynolds is the only Happy Thanksgiving I know of.

If you want some holiday-themed names more appropriate for this time of year, check out these posts from last year: Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, Merry Christmas, Christmas Carol, Christmas Tree, Happy New Year.

Source: Her name is Happy Thanksgiving, and she’s not the only one with a holiday handle (via Neatorama)

Holiday Baby Name: Happy New Year

fireworks

Happy New Year, everyone!

Time for the first post of 2013.

And my question is: Have any babies ever been named after the New Year?

The answer is yes.

Most notably, at least seven people have been named Happy New Year:

  • Happy Newyear Boor, female, born in 1926 in Pennsylvania
  • Happy New Year Dennis, female, born in 1920 in South Africa
  • Happy New Year Grierson, born in 1896 in Oregon
  • Happy New Year Kauakahi, female, born circa 1906 in Hawaii
  • Happy New Year Kapahu, male, born circa 1907 in Hawaii
  • Happy Newyear Kerwenzee, female, born 1877 in Ontario
  • Happy New Year Ribs, male, born circa 1912 in South Dakota

Several hundred others have simply been named New Year.

The earliest examples I’ve seen come from the 1600s:

  • Newyear Dale, male, baptized on January 6, 1675, in York, England.
  • Newyear Harrison, male, baptized on January 2, 1687, in York, England.
  • New Year Carlile, female, baptized on January 12, 1690, in Cumberland, England
  • New Years Mitchinson, male, baptized on December 31, 1691, in Cumberland, England
  • New Year Ireland, male, baptized on February 5, 1694, in York, England

Here are three more from the 1700s:

  • New Year Dowthwait, male, baptized on January 1, 1731 in York, England
  • New Year Prudget, male, baptized on January 15, 1737, in Suffolk, England
  • Hannah New Year Chamberlain, female, baptized on January 7, 1759 in Northampton, England

And three more from the 1800s:

  • William New Year Sadler, male, baptized on January 2, 1819, in Norfolk, England. Here he is in the Norfolk parish register:
    William New Year Sadler
  • Frances New Year Tobin, female, born on December 31, 1872, in Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • New Year Bowman, female, born on January 1, 1881, in Ontario, Canada

And three more in the 1900s:

  • Columbus New Year Clanton, male, born on January 1, 1900, in Alabama
  • Curtis New Year Cooper, male, born on January 1, 1905, in Texas
  • New Year Bell Sunday, female, born on January 1, 1912
  • New Year Mahu, male, born circa 1916 in Hawaii

The most recent New Year I’ve spotted was born in Micronesia in 2002. (The most recent U.S. New Year I’ve seen was born in 1930.)

More holiday baby names: Christmas Eve, Merry Christmas, Christmas Day, Christmas Carol, Christmas Tree

Holiday Baby Name: Christmas Day

Christmas giftYesterday I listed some people named Christmas Eve. Have there also been people named Christmas Day?

Yup, dozens.

The oldest I’ve spotted is Christmas Day (male) who was christened in March of 1659 in Berkshire, England.

The next-oldest are from the 1700s:

  • Christmas Day (male) christened on June 12, 1711, in London, England
  • Christmas Day (male) christened on December 27, 1762, in Suffolk, England

And there are a bunch in the 1800s, including the following:

  • Samuel Christmas Day (male) born on November 9, 1809 (and christened on December 24, 1809) in London, England
  • Christmas Day Godfrey (male) christened on January 3, 1817, in Norfolk, England
  • William Christmas Day (male) christened December 28, 1820, in Suffolk, England
  • Anna Christmas Day Dye (female) christened on November 11, 1837, in Norfolk, England
  • Christmas Day Jones (male) born circa 1850 in Wales
  • Christmas Day (male) born in December, 1876, in Ohio
  • John Christmas Day (male) born circa 1878 in New Zealand
  • Christmas Day Wagstaff, christened on January 27, 1884, in Essex, England

I haven’t seen anyone named Christmas Day since 1900, though.

More holiday baby names: Merry Christmas, Christmas Eve, Christmas Carol, Christmas Tree, Happy New Year

Holiday Baby Name: Merry Christmas

merry christmas bulbConrad and Nellie Miller built Santa Claus House in North Pole, Alaska, in the early 1950s. It’s now “one of the top attractions in Interior Alaska,” according to the website.

Con and Nellie also had three children, the third of which was a daughter born in 1961. She was named Merry Christmas Miller.

A name like “Merry Christmas” might have made sense for the proprietors of Santa Clause House, but what about for the rest of us? Have any other parents named their children “Merry Christmas”?

Yup.

Merry Christmas Miller is one of only about 40 people that I’ve found so far with the first and middle names Merry Christmas.

Another is Merry Christmas Easter, 1918-2008, of California.

I’ve also discovered about a dozen people with the first and last names Merry Christmas.

Many — though not all — of these Merry Christmases were females born on December 25, just like Merry Christmas Miller.

Source: Williams, Verne. “Santa not in red at $1.50 a letter.” Miami News 29 Nov. 1976: 1A.

More holiday baby names: Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, Christmas Carol, Christmas Tree, Happy New Year

Holiday Baby Name: Christmas Eve

Christmas Tree at NightHave any babies ever been named Christmas Eve?

Yup. So far, I’ve found over a dozen.

The earliest two were both born in Norfolk, England, in the 1700s:

  • Christmas Eve Steward, female, baptized on December 28, 1777
  • Christmas Eve Hayes, female, born on December 24, 1793

The next three were born in the 1800s:

  • Christmas Eve, female, christened on January 7, 1838, in Norfolk, England
  • Christmas Eve Flourney, male, born on December 24, 1871, in Texas
  • Alfred Christmas Eve, male, born circa 1877 in Lancashire, England

And the rest are from the 1900s:

  • Christmas Eve Fouts, female, born on December 24, 1901, in Indiana
  • Jonathan Christmas Eve, male, born circa 1903 in Essex, England
  • Christmas Eve Paul, born on 24 December 14, 1962, in North Carolina
  • Christmas Eve Holley, female, born on August 12, 1979, in California
  • Christmas Eve Hall, female, born on December 24, 1984, in Texas
  • Christmas Eve Morgan, female, born on December 24, 1984, in Texas
  • Christmas Eve Gruber, female, born on December 24, 1988, in California
  • Christmas Eve Heywood, female, married in 1993 in Nevada
  • Karen Christmas Eve Wiggins, female, married in 1999 in Florida

Only one of the above was definitively not born on Christmas Eve. I think her August 12 birthdate makes a conception date of Christmas Eve plausible. Either that or her surname, Holley, sounds like “holly” and that inspired the Christmas theme.

More holiday baby names: Merry Christmas, Christmas Day, Christmas Carol, Christmas Tree, Happy New Year