How popular is the baby name Harry in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Harry.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Harry


Posts that Mention the Name Harry

Popular Baby Names in Northern Ireland, 2018

According to the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA), the most popular baby names in Northern Ireland in 2018 were Grace and James/Noah (tie).

Here are the Northern Ireland’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2018:

Girl Names

  1. Grace, 221 baby girls
  2. Emily, 203
  3. Olivia, 178
  4. Sophie, 155
  5. Ella, 151
  6. Amelia, 140
  7. Isla, 135
  8. Anna, 128
  9. Lily, 125
  10. Lucy, 124

Boy Names

  1. Noah, 217 baby boys (tie)
  2. James, 217 (tie)
  3. Jack, 201
  4. Charlie, 191
  5. Jacob, 154 (tie)
  6. Daniel, 154 (tie)
  7. Oliver, 151
  8. Harry, 150
  9. Thomas, 142
  10. Leo, 137

In the girls’ top ten, Lily and Lucy replace Charlotte and Sophia.

In the boys’ top ten, Leo replaces Logan.

In the girls’ top 100, the highest climbers were Rosie, Sadie, and Saoirse.

In the boys’ top 100, the highest climbers were Tommy, Theo, and Hunter.

In 2017, the top names were Emily and James.

In the adjacent Republic of Ireland, the top names of 2018 were Emily and Jack.

Sources: Baby Names 2018 – NISRA, Disney, Moana and Storm – NI’s diverse baby names revealed

Popular Baby Names on the Isle of Man, 2018

According to the Civil Registry of the Isle of Man, the most popular baby names on the island in 2018 were Grace/Gracie and Harry.

The press release didn’t assign rankings to the rest of the top names, so I’ll give them to you in the order in which they were listed…

Girl Names

  • Grace
  • Sophia
  • Amelia
  • Isla
  • Ava
  • Phoebe

Boy Names

  • Harry
  • Alexander
  • Charles
  • George
  • Theodore

Interestingly, neither Olivia nor Oliver (the top names of 2017) made it into the top 5 in 2018.

Source: Isle of Man’s most popular baby names in 2018 revealed as Harry and Grace

Rare Girl Names from Early Cinema: G

Looking for an uncommon girl name with a retro feel?

Here’s a list of rare female G-names associated with the earliest decades of cinema (1910s to 1940s).

I’ve included links to popularity graphs for the names that have seen enough usage to appear in the SSA data.

Gaby
Gaby Derilly was a character played by actress Josette Andriot in the short film The Green God (1913).

  • Usage of the baby name Gaby.

Gail
Gail Kane was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in Pennsylvania in 1887. Her birth name was Abigail Kane. Gail Patrick was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1930s. She was born in Alabama in 1911. Her birth name was Margaret LaVelle Fitzpatrick. Gail was also a character name in multiple films, including Dangerous (1935) and Woman Doctor (1939).

  • Usage of the baby name Gail.

Gaile
Gaile Warren was a character played by actress Ruth Robinson in the film An American Tragedy (1931).

  • Usage of the baby name Gaile.

Galatea
Galatea was a character name in multiple films, including Pygmalion and Galatea (short, 1912) and It’s a Cruel World (short, 1918).

Garda
Garda Sloane was a character played by various actresses (Florence Rice, Rosalind Russell, Ann Sothern) in various late-1930s mystery movies (Fast Company, Fast and Loose, Fast and Furious) written by Harry Kurnitz.

  • Usage of the baby name Garda.

Garla
Garla was a character played by actress Florine McKinney in the film Cynara (1932).

  • Usage of the baby name Garla.

Garnet
Garnet was a character name in multiple films, including Johnny Eager (1941) and So Goes My Love (1946).

  • Usage of the baby name Garnet.

Gavinia
Gavinia was a character played by actress Kate Davenport in the film Sentimental Tommy (1921).

Gaya
Gaya was a character played by actress Irene Wallace in the short film The Master of the Bengals (1915).

  • Usage of the baby name Gaya.

Gayle
Gayle Adams was a character played by actress Claudia Dell in the film What Becomes of the Children? (1936).

  • Usage of the baby name Gayle.

Gaza
Gaza was a character played by actress Carmen Phillips in the film A Cafe in Cairo (1924).

  • Usage of the baby name Gaza.

Gazella
Gazella Perkins was a character played by actress Helen Jerome Eddy in the film Girls Demand Excitement (1931).

Gee Gee
Gee Gee Graham was a character played by actress Iris Adrian in the film Lady of Burlesque (1943).

Genelle
Genelle was a character played by actress Betty Compson in the film The Green Temptation (1922).

Genesta
Genesta Slott was a character played by actress Sydney Fairbrother in the film All In (1936).

Genevia
Genevia was a character played by actress Nina Vanna in the film The Man Without Desire (1923).

Genevra
Genevra was a character name in multiple films, including The Talk of the Town (1918) and The Man from Brodney’s (1923).

Gentian
Gentian Tyrell was a character played by actress Gladys Franzin in the film Let Not Man Put Assunder (1924).

Genya
Genya Smetana was a character played by actress Pola Negri in the film Hi Diddle Diddle (1943).

  • Usage of the baby name Genya.

George-Anne
George-Anne Carleton was a character played by actress Janet Gaynor in the film The Young in Heart (1938).

Georgette
Georgette was a character name in multiple films, including A Husband’s Awakening (short, 1912) and So This Is Paris (1926).

Georgi
Georgi Gragore was a character played by actress Hedy Lamarr in the film I Take This Woman (1940).

  • Usage of the baby name Georgi.

Georgie
Georgie Hastings was a character played by actress Sally O’Neil in the film The Lovelorn (1927).

Georgine
Georgine was a character name in multiple films, including The French Doll (1923) and Play Girl (1932).

Gerda
Gerda Holmes was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s. She was born in Illinois in 1892. Gerda was also a character name in multiple films, including Three Sinners (1928) and Babies for Sale (1940).

  • Usage of the baby name Gerda.

Germaine
Germaine De Neel was an actress who appeared in films in the 1930s. She was born in Canada in 1911. Germaine was also a character name in multiple films, including Evening Clothes (1927) and The Great Garrick (1937).

Gerry
Gerry was a character name in multiple films, including Daring Danger (1932) and Tail Spin (1939).

  • Usage of the baby name Gerry.

Gerta
Gerta Klangi was a character played by actress Tala Birell in the film The Captain Hates the Sea (1934).

  • Usage of the baby name Gerta.

Gertie
Gertie was a character name in multiple films, including Lamplighter (1921) and Gold Dust Gertie (1931).

  • Usage of the baby name Gertie.

Gertrude
Gertrude McCoy was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in Georgia in 1890. Gertrude Robinson was an actress who appeared in films from the 1900s to the 1920s. She was born in New York in 1890. Gertrude was also a character name in multiple films, such as Coming-Out Party (1934).

Ghirlaine
Ghirlaine was a character played by actress Doris Kenyon in the film The Blonde Saint (1926).

Ghita
Ghita Galin was a character played by actress Alice Brady in the film Metropolitan (1935).

  • Usage of the baby name Ghita.

Ghula
Ghula was a character played by actress Dolly Larkin in the short film The Message of the Rose (1913).

Giacinta
Giacinta was a character played by actress Cissy Fitzgerald in the film Laugh, Clown, Laugh (1928).

Giannina
Giannina was a character played by actress Mary Pickford in the short film The Violin Maker of Cremona (1909).

Gigi
Gigi Perreau was an actress who appeared from the 1940s to the 2010s. She was born in France in 1941. Her birth name was Ghislaine Elizabeth Marie Thérèse Perreau-Saussine.

  • Usage of the baby name Gigi.

Gilberta
Gilberta Stanley was a character played by actress Lulu Bowers in the film The Matrimonial Martyr (1916).

Gilberte
Gilberte was a character name in multiple films, including A Hungry Heart (1917) and A Night of Mystery (1928).

Gilda
Gilda was a character name in multiple films, including Go Straight (1925) and Gilda (1946).

  • Usage of the baby name Gilda.

Ginette
Ginette was a character name in multiple films, including The Two Girls (1921) and A Kiss in a Taxi (1927).

Ginna
Ginna was a character played by actress Eve Arden in the film My Reputation (1946).

  • Usage of the baby name Ginna (which debuted in the data in 1947).

Ginny
Ginny Simms was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1950s. She was born in Texas in 1913. Her birth name was Virginia Ellen Simms. Ginny was also a character played by actress Luana Patten in the film Song of the South (1946).

  • Usage of the baby name Ginny.

Girda
Girda was a character name in multiple films, including Fool’s Paradise (1921) and The Girl in the Flat (1934).

Gita
Gita Carteret was a character played by actress Dorothy Mackaill in the film The Crystal Cup (1927).

  • Usage of the baby name Gita.

Giuditta
Giuditta Pasta was a character played by actress Benita Hume in the film The Divine Spark (1935).

Glad
Glad was a character played by various actresses (such as Mary Pickford and Jacqueline Logan) in various movies called The Dawn of a Tomorrow, all based on the novella of the same name by Frances Hodgson Burnett.

Glenda
Glenda Farrell was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1970s. She was born in Oklahoma in 1901. Glenda was also a character name in multiple films, including The White Parade (1934) and Down Argentine Way (1940).

  • Usage of the baby name Glenda.

Glenna
Glenna Marsh was a character played by actress Dorothy Revier in the film The Siren (1927).

  • Usage of the baby name Glenna.

Glenny
Glenny was a character played by actress Janet Sully in the film The Lure of Luxury (1918).

  • Usage of the baby name Glenny.

Glinda
Glinda was a character name in multiple films, including The Fairylogue and Radio-Plays (1908) and The Wizard of Oz (1939).

  • Usage of the baby name Glinda.

Glorian
Glorian Gray was an actress who appeared in films in the 1930s.

Gloriana
Gloriana was a character played by actress Zoe Rae in the film Gloriana (1916).

Glorietta
Glorietta Hope was a character played by actress Lucille Carlisle in the short film The Counter Jumper (1922).

Gloriette
Gloriette French was an actress who appeared in 1 film in 1931.

Godiva
Godiva was a character name in multiple films, including Lady Godiva (short, 1911) and The Story of the Blood Red Rose (short, 1914).

  • Usage of the baby name Godiva.

Gonda
Gonda was a character played by actress Belle Bennett in the film Ashes of Hope (1917).

Googie
Googie Withers was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1990s. She was born in British India (now Pakistan) in 1917. Her birth name was Georgette Lizette Withers.

Gora
Gora Dwight was a character played by actress Clarissa Selwynne in the film Black Oxen (1923).

Goytia
Goytia was a character played by actress Lottice Howell in the film In Gay Madrid (1930).

Granella
Granella was a character played by actress Malvina Longfellow in the film The Wandering Jew (1923).

Gratia
Gratia Latham was a character played by actress Pearl White in the film A Virgin Paradise (1921).

  • Usage of the baby name Gratia.

Grazia
Grazia was a character played by actress Evelyn Venable in the film Death Takes a Holiday (1934).

  • Usage of the baby name Grazia.

Gretna
Gretna Hillman was a character played by actress Sally Crute in the short film The Mystery of the Talking Wire (1914).

  • Usage of the baby name Gretna.

Griselda
Griselda was a character name in multiple films, including The Adventure Hunter (short, 1915) and Two-Faced Woman (1941).

Grizel
Grizel was a character name in multiple films, including Sentimental Tommy (1921) and Enchantment (1948).

  • Usage of the baby name Grizel.

Grizette
Grizette was a character played by actress Clara Bow in the film Kiss Me Again (1925).

Gudula
Gudula Rothschild was a character played by actress Helen Westley in the film The House of Rothschild (1934).

Guerda
Guerda Anthony was a character played by actress Constance Bennett in the film Wandering Fires (1925).

Guerita
Guerita was a character played by actress Barbara La Marr in the film Thy Name is Woman (1924).

Guillemette
Guillemette was a character played by actress Arlette Marchal in the film The Hen (1933).

Gulnar
Gulnar was a character played by actress Fanny Ferrari in the film Kismet (1920).

Gunhild
Gunhild was a character played by actress Seena Owen in the film A Yankee from the West (1915).

Guninana
Guninana was a character played by actress Steffi Duna in the film Man of Two Worlds (1934).

Gurtha
Gurtha was a character played by actress Hilda Vaughn in the film Banjo on My Knee (1936).

  • Usage of the baby name Gurtha.

Gussie
Gussie Bosley was a character played by actress Myrta Bonillas in the film The Custard Cup (1923).

  • Usage of the baby name Gussie.

Gusta
Gusta was a character played by actress Gwili Andre in the film A Woman’s Face (1941).

  • Usage of the baby name Gusta.

Gwendoline
Gwendoline was a character played by actress Beverly Bayne in the short film Love and Lavallieres (1913).

Gwennie
Gwennie Lyne was a character played by actress Julia Swayne Gordon in the film The Maelstrom (1917).

Gwenny
Gwenny Miller was a character played by actress June Lang in the film Too Many Women (1942).

Gwili
Gwili Andre was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1940s. She was born in Denmark in 1908. Her birth name was Gurli Andresen.

  • Usage of the baby name Gwili (which debuted the year Andre’s first film came out).

Gwyn
Gwyn Allen was a character played by actress Arline Judge in the film Smith of Minnesota (1942).

  • Usage of the baby name Gwyn.

Gwynne
Gwynne Evans was a character played by actress Leatrice Joy in the film Changing Husbands (1924).

  • Usage of the baby name Gwynne.

Gypsy
Gypsy Abbott was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s. She was born in Georgia in 1897. Gypsy Rose Lee was an actress who appeared in films in the 1930s to the 1960s. She was born in Washington in 1911. Her birth name was Rose Louise Hovick. Gypsy was also a character played by actress Evelyn Brent in the film Bowery Champs (1944).

  • Usage of the baby name Gypsy.

…Which of the above G-names do you like best?

Source: IMDb

The Story of Doria

The baby name name Doria has peaked in usage twice so far. The second spike happened in 1971, the year of Tropical Storm Doria (which ended up being the costliest storm of the season). But the first spike, which was more subtle, happened in 1957:

  • 1959: 29 baby girls named Doria
  • 1958: 31 baby girls named Doria
  • 1957: 37 baby girls named Doria
  • 1956: 27 baby girls named Doria
  • 1955: 24 baby girls named Doria

What’s behind the first spike?

I think it’s same thing that was behind the sudden jump in usage of the name Andrea* a year earlier:

  • 1958: 3,241 baby girls (and 65 baby boys) named Andrea
  • 1957: 3,369 baby girls (and 67 baby boys) named Andrea
  • 1956: 3,394 baby girls (and 62 baby boys) named Andrea
  • 1955: 2,764 baby girls (and 31 baby boys) named Andrea
  • 1954: 2,721 baby girls (and 26 baby boys) named Andrea

On the night of July 25-26, 1956 — exactly sixty-three years ago — the Italian ocean liner SS Andrea Doria sank just off the east coast of America.

The Andrea Doria — said to be “unsinkable” (like the Titanic) — had been known for its luxury. It featured theaters, dance floors, card-rooms, lounges, and three outdoor swimming pools (one per passenger class). Since its maiden voyage in 1953, it regularly made trips across the Atlantic.

On the final night of one such trip from Italy to New York, the Andrea Doria was sailing through thick fog 50 miles south of Nantucket. Just past 11 pm, the Doria‘s starboard side was suddenly pierced by the ice-breaking prow of a smaller passenger ship called the MS Stockholm (which had left New York at mid-day and was en route to Sweden). The collision resulted in the deaths of 51 people — 46 of them Andrea Doria passengers.

Within a few minutes of the crash, the Doria had taken on so much water that it was listing more than 20 degrees to starboard. Evacuations began and, over the course of the night, the still-seaworthy Stockholm and other nearby ships came to the rescue of the remaining passengers and crew (a total of 1,660 people).

Early the next morning, East Coast newsmen in airplanes visited the crippled Doria. They took photographs and got video footage of the ship’s final moments. (It began sinking in earnest at 9:45 am, and disappeared from view under the water at 10:09 am.)

The video footage was broadcast on TV news shows later the same day, making the sinking of the Andrea Doria one of the very first televised tragedies.

The next day, photos of the doomed Doria were on the front pages of newspapers nation-wide. A few weeks later, more Doria shots ran in a photo-essay and on the cover of Life magazine. The most famous Doria photos were the Pulitzer-winning ones taken by Harry A. Trask.

All this media exposure drew attention to the two names “Andrea” and “Doria,” which in turn gave boost to the usage of both names, which is what we saw in the data above.

The ship had been named for 16th-century Italian admiral Andrea Doria, a member of the wealthy Genoese Doria (D’Oria, De Auria) family. The family traces its lineage back to a woman named Auria.

What do you think of the name Doria? Do you like it more or less than the name Andrea?

Sources:

Image: Screenshot from A Welcome Guest in the House

*Dozens of the baby girls named Andrea during the second half of 1956 got the middle name Doria. Here’s one example from Idaho.

Name Quotes #72: Meadow, Kamiyah, Tanveer

Time for another batch of name quotes!

From the book My Story of Embracing Purpose, Healing, and Hope (2019) by Queer Eye co-star Karamo Brown:

“When we were preparing to shoot season 1, a curious crew member asked Tan why he didn’t go by his birth name. Tan replied, “Because when you google ‘Tanveer,’ only terrorists come up. It’s easier.” Now, I love Tan — and I know he is not ashamed of his Muslim or Pakastani heritage. […] I said, “Listen, you can be the one to change the public perception and image associated with your name. If our show is a success, when people google ‘Tanveer,’ they’ll see your positive image. It’s going to be someone who’s doing good in the world. Think of all the little boys who are feeling the same way you feel and how you can inspired them to have pride in their name.”

(Elsewhere in the book he talks about his own first and middle names, Karamo and Karega, which mean “educated” and “rebel” in Swahili.)

Thoughts on being named “Ginny Lindle” from an article about hard-to-pronounce names:

“My slimming club leader has been calling me Guinea – yes, as in guinea pig – for months now.

[…]

“It’s embarrassing and very awkward. I’ve often considered changing my first name so at least one of my names will not confuse people.

“I hold a fairly senior position but it’s hard to make a good first impression when people ask your name several times – usually with socially awkward laughter!”

Sigourney Weaver (born Susan Weaver) talks about her name in an interview with Esquire magazine:

I changed my name when I was about twelve because I didn’t like being called Sue or Susie. I felt I needed a longer name because I was so tall. So what happened? Now everyone calls me Sig or Siggy.

(In another interview, Signourney mentioned that she was nearly named Flavia.)

From a writer who regrets giving his son the middle name Flip:

In hindsight, I wish I’d given my son something a little more ordinary, that didn’t stand out quite so much. Or perhaps not given him a middle name. And sure, I could change it, but I doubt I will go that far. Maybe he will learn to love it. Maybe he will change it on his own someday. I don’t know.

For the most part, he doesn’t really notice his middle name and I’m grateful for that. But when it does come up, I do regret it.

A short item printed a century ago in a short-lived Chicago newspaper (The Day Book, 4 Feb., 1915, page 20):

The tango craze has reached another high notch, a new community in West Virginia being named Tango. Curiously enough there is not a resident who is familiar with the dance.

How Kamiyah Mobley — who was kidnapped at birth and raised under the name Alexis Manigo — deals with having two different names:

“My name tag at my job says Alexis. Kamiyah Mobley is on my paperwork. That’s who gets paid,” she said. “People that know me, call me Alexis. If you know me by Kamiyah – call me Kamiyah. I go by both.”

A name story from New York (from an article about unique baby names on Long Island):

My daughter’s name is Meadow Brooke. I was raised in Merrick, right off of the Meadowbrook Parkway, and my husband loved ‘The Sopranos’ (Meadow was the Sopranos’ daughter in the series). So we named our daughter after the show and the parkway I’ve driven my entire life. Her name means so much to us and only people in New York would understand the meaning behind it.

(The Sopranos began airing in early 1999. Usage of the name Meadow more than doubled that year, then more than tripled the next year. By 2001 it was in the top 1,000, and it’s been there ever since.)

From an essay about baby name obsession:

But like juice cleanses and shower sex, it turns out that naming a human might be more fun in theory than reality. Some people even get more into it after taking the pressure of parenthood out of the equation altogether. Seven years into her marriage, Amanda, 31, said she and her husband are “one hundred percent” sure they won’t have kids, but still chat about their top names. “It’s like online window shopping and then closing out all your tabs before you buy,” she quips.

About the Hmong-American 2019 Gerber Spokesbaby, Kairi [pronounced KY-ree]:

So, who is Kairi? According to her parents, the 15-month-old loves to play hide and seek and build forts with blankets. She has a spunky attitude and vibrant facial expressions. And she was named after a character from the video game Kingdom Hearts.

(According to Gerber, Kairi’s mother Ying went by “Kairi” as a nickname during high school.)

Finally, two quotes about the name of the latest royal baby, Archie. The first is from CNN:

Archie is an approachable, nicknamey, old-school sort of name. Guys like Archie don’t usually live in a palace. Archie is the buddy you go bowling with.

The second is from Esquire:

The royals aren’t known for being wild. A crazy day at Buckingham Palace is when a corgi goes rogue and barks at a pigeon. So when Prince Harry and Meghan Markle name their first born Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor, that’s the royal equivalent of doing a line of cocaine in church.

For more name-related quotes, check out the name quotes category.