How popular is the baby name Herb in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Herb and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Herb.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Herb

Number of Babies Named Herb

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Herb

Stickers with Names from the ’60s

In 1969, dozens of “Mod Generation” stickers — each of which featured a drawing of a young person and a name — were distributed inside packs of Topps chewing gum.

(The outfits and hairstyles seem a lot more hippie than mod to me, but oh well.)

Female names used on the stickers include Alice, Ann, Barbara, Betty, Connie, Diane, Donna, Dotty, Ellen, Esther, Fay, Frances, Gloria, Helen, Jackie, Joan, Judy, Lois, Marie, Mary, Millie, Minda, Nancy, Natalie, Phyllis, Rose, Shelly and Susan.

Mod Generation Sticker BettyMod Generation Sticker DonnaMod Generation Sticker Minda

Male names used on the stickers include Barry, Bert, Bill, Charlie, Chris, Dave, Don, Fred, George, Herb, Irv, Jerry, Joe, John, Larry, Louis, Michael, Paul, Pete, Ray, Richard, Roy, Teddy and Tony.

Mod Generation Sticker IrvMod Generation Sticker LarryMod Generation Sticker Terry

While of these female and male names do you like most? How about least?

Source: 1969: “Mod Generation” Stickers, Mod Generation – 1969


San Francisco Baby Named for Graf Zeppelin

ZeppelinIn August of 1929, the 775-foot, hydrogen-filled LZ 127 Graf Zeppelin became the first lighter-than-air craft to circle the globe. The rigid airship traveled from Lakehurst (New Jersey) to Friedrichshafen (Germany) to Tokyo (Japan) to Los Angeles (California) and back to Lakehurst in about three weeks, from August 8 to August 29.

The Pacific crossing didn’t actually take the ship directly to Los Angeles, but to San Francisco first. The ship’s commander, Hugo Eckener, “deliberately timed his flight…to make a dramatic entrance through San Francisco’s Golden Gate with the sun setting behind the ship.” The dirigible made several passes over San Francisco on August 25 before continuing down the coast to L.A.

The scene must have made a big impression on the the Wong family of San Francisco, because a week later, on September 1, they welcomed a baby boy and named him Zeppelin Wai Wong.

Zeppelin Wai Wong went on to attend Stanford and become a successful attorney. In 1953, San Francisco journalist Herb Caen mentioned Zep in his book Don’t Call it Frisco:

One of San Francisco’s more oddly named citizens is a Stanford graduate named Zeppelin Wai Wong — and naturally, everybody wonders how come. Very simple, really. Zeppelin (or “Zep”) was born in San Francisco on September 1, 1929, while the German dirigible, Graf Zeppelin was droning overhead — and he thinks the strange name (his father’s idea) is O.K. “Could be worse,” he points out “Suppose it had been the Shenandoah?”

(The USS Shenandoah was a U.S. Navy airship that had crash landed in 1925.)

The LZ 127 Graf Zeppelin remained in service until mid-1937, when it was grounded permanently following the Hindenburg disaster.

Sources:

  • Caen, Herb. Don’t Call it Frisco. New York: Doubleday, 1953.
  • Graf Zeppelin History – Airships: The Hindenburg and other Zeppelins
  • “Reunion Attracts 2,000.” St. Petersburg Times 19 Sept. 1960: 14-A.

Image: Grombo

Baby Names from Hockey

A reader named Elizabeth has sent me a rather cool list of hockey-inspired baby names. She writes:

I’m a name enthusiast and a hockey fanatic, and my husband and I have been tossing around the idea of naming our son after hockey players.

They haven’t seen any lists of hockey names for babies, though, so they decided to compile one themselves. It includes “both all-time greats and current players.”

I thought I’d pass it along to share with fellow rink rats who may be reading your blog and can’t think of anything other than Wayne (Gretzky), Herb (Brooks), or Patrick (Roy).

Or Bobby (Orr), whose statue was recently unveiled outside the Garden! But I digress…

Here is the list:

Andreas (Andreas Lilja, Andreas Nödl)
Aurèle (Aurèle Émile Joliat)
Bentley (Max Bentley, Doug Bentley)
Bourque (Ray Bourque, Rene Bourque)
Briere (Danny Briere)
Brooks (Herb Brooks, Brooks Laich)
Crosby (Sidney Crosby)
Dryden (Ken Dryden)
Eaves (Patrick Eaves)
Elias (Patrik Elias)
Émile (Aurèle Émile Joliat)
Ennis (Tyler Ennis)
Evgeni (Evgeni Malkin, Evgeni Nabokov)
Ilya (Ilya Kovalchuk, Ilya Bryzgalov)
Kane (Patrick Kane)
Lach (Elmer Lach)
Lemieux (Mario Lemieux)
Luca (Luca Caputi)
Malkin (Evgeni Malkin)
Malone (Joe Malone, Ryan Malone)
Marek (Marek Svatos)
Mario (Mario Lemieux)
Marleau (Patrick Marleau)
Michal (Michal Handzus)
Milan (Milan Hejduk)
Modano (Mike Modano)
Nikolai (Nikolai Khabibulin)
Parise (Zach Parise)
Pavel (Pavel Datsyuk)
Rene (Rene Bourque)
Savard (Serge Savard, Marc Savard)
Shore (Eddie Shore)
Stephane (Stephane Yelle)
Turco (Marty Turco)

Thanks so much for sharing, Elizabeth!

Another good source of hockey names is the Legends of Hockey website, which is affiliated with the Hockey Hall of Fame.

Which hockey names are your favorites?