How popular is the baby name Honey in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Honey and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Honey.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Honey

Number of Babies Named Honey

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Honey

Unique American Baby Names of 2009 (Girls’ Edition)

Here are some baby girl names that were given to at least five but no more than 99 babies in the United States last year. (I published the equivalent boys’ list a little while ago.)

Blends

  • Miangel (65) – Mi angel
  • Myangel (31) – My angel
  • Imunique (12) – I’m unique
  • Miamor (9) – Mi amor
  • Wesleigh (8) – Wesley, though it looks more like “we sleigh” to me.
  • Amunique (6) – Am unique
  • Mylove (6) – My love
  • Pennylane (5)

Numerical

  • Seven (28)
  • Amillion (7)

The -ities

  • Vanity (52)
  • Divinity (45)
  • Verity (33)
  • Chastity (30)
  • Amity (27)
  • Unity (27)
  • Clarity (21)
  • Purity (17)
  • Infinity (14)
  • Reality (11)
  • Sincerity (8)
  • Prosperity (7)
  • Serendipity (5)

Very hush-hush

  • Whisper (20)
  • Secret (11)

Twi-Names

  • Jasper (31)
  • Renesmee (17) and Renesme (5)
  • Carlisle (12)
  • Twilight (7)
  • Cullen (5)

And finally…


Once You Go Unique, Is There No Going Back?

Echo Scarlett Honey Beaver of Milton Keynes (a town in England) is the second of five siblings. The other four are named:

  • Clint Battista (first name for Clint Eastwood)
  • Milo Phoenix Dee
  • Disney Taime Sapphire (first name in tribute to Walt Disney films)
  • Dali Paolo Reuben (first name for Salvador Dalí)

She’s also a mom. Her two children are Pharrell Cassius Diego and Lovella Honey. She says, “I had to carry on the tradition of unusual names–and I’m sure the rest of my family will do the same.”

Her comment made me curious. Are adults who grew up surrounded by unique names more likely to give their own children unique names?

Here are a couple of case studies:

  • Frank Zappa‘s four children are Moon, Dweezil, Ahmet (after Ahmet Ertegun, co-founder of Atlantic Records) and Diva. His grandkids are Mathilda, Zola and Ceylon.
  • Joaquin Phoenix’s sisters and (late) brother are River, Rain, Liberty and Summer. His nieces and nephews are Jonas, Rio, Indigo, Scarlette, Indiana and Atticus.

What are your thoughts?

Source: What’s in a name? Ask the Beavers, Milton Keynes Citizen, 2010

More from England and Wales – Honey and Brandon-Lee

Here are two names that piqued my interest as I read through the baby name rankings for England and Wales yesterday.

Honey
Honey was the 190th most popular baby girl name on the list. Parents have also been using alternative spellings of Honey, and throwing (pouring?) Honey into compound names. Here are all the Honeys I spotted:

  • Honey (278 babies)
  • Honey-Rose (8)
  • Honey-May (6)
  • Hunnie (6)
  • Honey-Mae (4)
  • Hunni (4)
  • Hunny (4)
  • Honey-Marie (3)

They honey-names don’t even account for a tenth of a percent of all the baby girls in the data set, so I wouldn’t call them trendy. But they’re definitely on the radar.

Can’t say I’m on board with Honey. To me, honey is either a term of endearment or something I use in my tea. I like it for dogs and cats, but not for humans. (Would make a great stripper name, though.)

Honey has never charted here in the U.S., but I have seen it on birth announcements before.

Brandon-Lee
Lee was a very common second element in compound names for both genders. Despite this, I’d bet at least a few of the baby Brandon-Lees I saw were named specifically for Brandon Lee, the actor who died while filming cult favorite The Crow (1994). Here are the numbers:

  • Brandon-Lee (23 babies)
  • Brandonlee (4)
  • Brandon-Leigh (3)

The only “-Lee” names to rank higher than Brandon-Lee were Jayden-Lee (29), Harvey-Lee (26), and Tommy-Lee (26).

Source: Office for National Statistics