How popular is the baby name Hortense in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Hortense and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Hortense.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Hortense

Number of Babies Named Hortense

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Hortense

Vermont Family with 23 Children

In 1872, The Burlington Free Press printed a story about a 98-year-old widow in Vermont who’d given birth to 23 children.

Marie Abert was born in Quebec in 1773 and married her late husband, Francois Peppin, at the age of 17. They left Canada for Vermont in 1838.

It was noticeable, in conversation with the old lady, that while her memory of the names and ages of her elder children was quite distinct, her recollection of the latter ones who have died grew indistinct, after the fifteenth or sixteenth, and the names of four she was unable to give us.

Here are the names of most of her children:

1. Francois
2. Antoine
3. Marie
4. Jean Baptise
5. Pierre
6. Joseph
7. Oliver
8. Pauline (twin)
9. Clemence (twin)
10. Julia
11. Andrew
12. Timothy
13. Hortense
14. Clemence
15. Zoe
16. “After Zoe came four children, two boys and two girls, all of whom died young.”
17. ?
18. ?
19. ?
20. Bruno
21. Paul
22. Seth
23. ? (boy)

Marie and Francois also had at least 99 grandchildren and 98 great-grandchildren.

Which of the 23 names — the ones that are known, anyway — is your favorite?

Source: “A Large Family.” New York Times 6 Jun. 1872.

How They Named the Baby (Poem)

I think it’s time for a poem.

Here’s one from the late 1800s called “How They Named the Baby.” It was first published in humor magazine Judge.

They talked of Medora, Aurora and Flora,
Of Mabel and Marcia and Mildred and May;
Debated the question of Helen, Honora,
Clarissa, Camilla, and Phyllis and Fay.

They thought of Marcella, Estella, and Bella;
Considered Cecilia, Jeanette, and Pauline;
Alicia, Adela, Annette, Arabella,
And Ethel and Eunice, Hortense and Irene.

One liked Theodora, another Leonora;
Some argued for Edith and some for Elaine;
For Madeline, Adeline, Lily and Lora;
And then, after all, they decided on Jane.

Which of the above names do you like most? How about least?

Baby Names Gone Unusable

I thought I would follow up my posts on bad meanings and unlikable names with ten baby names that have been rendered fairly unusable for modern parents, for various reasons.

  • Dorcas (f) – last ranked among the top 1,000 U.S. names in 1950.
  • Fairy (f) – last ranked in 1932.
  • Fanny (f) – last ranked in 1939.
  • Gaylord (m) – last ranked in 1956, though — who knows? — maybe those Focker movies will spark a comeback. :)
  • Hortense (f) – last ranked in 1941.
  • Hymen (m) – last ranked in 1913.
  • Maxie/Maxi (f) – Maxie last ranked in 1962; Maxi has never ranked.
  • Pansy (f) – last ranked in 1952.
  • Philander (m) – has never ranked, likely because its negative connotation dates all the way back to the mid-19th century (before data was collected).
  • Rube (m) – last ranked in 1907.

Did I miss any good ones? (Good as in bad, of course.)