How popular is the baby name Hosea in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Hosea.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Hosea


Posts that Mention the Name Hosea

The 10 Children of Arthur Guinness

In 1759, Arthur Guinness founded Ireland’s now-famous Guinness Brewery.

A couple of years later, in 1761, he married his wife Olivia. She had 21 pregnancies — 10 live births and 11 miscarriages. (“It is a testament to her solid constitution that she survived 21 pregnancies in an era when so many women died in childbirth.”)

Here are the names of their ten children (4 girls, 6 boys):

  1. Elizabeth (born in 1763)
  2. Hosea (1765)
  3. Arthur II (1768)
  4. Edward (1772)
  5. Olivia (1775)
  6. Benjamin (1777)
  7. William Lunell (1779)
  8. Louisa (1781)
  9. John Grattan (1783)
  10. Mary Anne (1787)

Three of Arthur’s sons — Arthur II, Benjamin, and William Lunell — ended up working in the family business.

I don’t know where the middle name “Lunell” came from, but “Grattan” was a surname on Olivia’s side of the family. It was her mother’s maiden name, and it was also the surname of distant cousin/politician Henry Grattan, “through whose lobbying major changes in the fiscal status of beer were eventually secured, most dramatically with the abolition of the excise duty on beer in 1795.”

Sources:

Inconspicuous Anagram Baby Names

I recently updated my old Anagram Baby Names post to make it much more comprehensive. As I worked on it, though, I noticed that many of those sets of names had obvious similarities, such as the same first letters and/or the same rhythm.

So I thought I’d make a second, shorter list of anagram names that were less conspicuously similar. Specifically, I wanted the second list to feature sets of names with different first letters and different numbers of syllables.

And that’s what you’ll find below — pairs of anagram names that are relatively distinct from one another. So much so that, at first glance (or listen), some might not even strike you as being anagrammatic at all. :)

Click on any name to check out its popularity graph…

Most of the names above have a clear number of syllables, but a few do not. (I categorized them according to my own interpretation/accent.) So, if you’re interested in using any of these pairings, just remember to test the names out loud first!

Which of the pairs above do you like best?

Namespotting in Arlington: Ammi, Loammi, Ruhamah

Names of American revolutionary soldiers at the Old Burying Ground, Arlington, MA
Patriots’ Grave, Old Burying Ground, Arlington, MA

Hubs and I visited the town of Arlington last weekend. Of course, I made sure one of our stops was a graveyard. :)

The one we chose was the Old Burying Ground, a small cemetery used from the 1730s to the 1840s. (During those years, Arlington wasn’t even called “Arlington” yet. The original name was Menotomy, which came from an Algonquin word.)

Most of the names in the graveyard are biblical names, some still common today (e.g., Benjamin, Elizabeth, Lydia, William), others not so stylish anymore (e.g., Dorcas, Ebenezer, Jeduthan, Mehitable — one of my all-time faves!).

One name that made me curious was Ammi, which belonged to both Ammi Cutter (1733-1795) — one of the “old men of Menotomy” — and to his son.

At first I thought Ammi was a nickname for Loammi, as it reminded me of Loammi Baldwin, another Revolutionary soldier from the region. Turns out this wasn’t the case, but the two names are related.

In the Book of Hosea, God tells Hosea to name his daughter Lo-Ruhamah, meaning “not loved,” and to name his son Lo-Ammi, meaning “not my people.” Later on, God renames the two Ruhamah, meaning “loved,” and Ammi, meaning “my people.”

And, wouldn’t you know, Ammi Cutter had a twin sister named Ruhamah. (She’s buried there as well.)

How do you like Ammi and Ruhamah as boy-girl twin names?

Source: Paige, Lucius Robinson. History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877. Cambridge, MA: H. O. Houghton and Co., 1877.