How popular is the baby name Hudson in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Hudson.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Hudson


Posts that Mention the Name Hudson

Most Popular Baby Names in Saskatchewan, 2018

According to eHealth Saskatchewan, the most popular baby names in the province in 2018 were Olivia and Liam.

Here are Saskatchewan’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2018:

Girl Names

  1. Olivia, 69 baby girls
  2. Emma, 62
  3. Harper, 55
  4. Ava, 48
  5. Sophia, 47
  6. Ella, 45
  7. Charlotte, 43
  8. Emily, 40 (3-way tie)
  9. Lily, 40 (3-way tie)
  10. Scarlett, 40 (3-way tie)

Boy Names

  1. Liam, 84 baby boys
  2. Oliver, 61
  3. Benjamin, 59
  4. Noah, 58
  5. Jacob, 55
  6. Lincoln, 54
  7. Jack, 50 (2-way tie)
  8. Logan, 50 (2-way tie)
  9. James, 47
  10. Hudson, 46 (2-way tie)
  11. Levi, 46 (2-way tie)

In the girls’ top 10, Ella, Charlotte, Lily and Scarlett replace Hannah (now 11th), Amelia (now 19th), Aria, and Chloe.

In the boys’ top 10, Logan, Hudson and Levi replace William (now 12th) and Owen.

In 2017, the top two names were the same.

Source: Most Popular Baby Names for 2018

Baby Names Rising in 2018: Boy Names

Which boy names increased the most in popularity from 2017 to 2018?

In this post we’ll answer the question two different ways: first by looking at the top absolute (raw number) rises, second by looking at the top relative rises.

Fastest Rising Boy Names: Absolute

  1. Theodore, +1,070 baby boys
  2. Liam, +1,039
  3. Asher, +772
  4. Leo, +769
  5. Hudson, +759
  6. Gael, +686
  7. Ezra, +680
  8. Luca, +507
  9. Carson, +487
  10. Milo, +487

Fastest Rising Boy Names: Relative

  1. Atreus, +1888% (from 8 to 159 baby boys)
  2. Emric, +843%
  3. Nahmir, +820%
  4. Deluca, +420%
  5. Jiren, +400%
  6. Nihit, +360%
  7. Daire, +350%
  8. Dayveon, +350%
  9. Syre, +346%
  10. Kaelum, +340%

(This second list only accounts for names that appeared in the data both years; I’ll be posting the 2018 debut names separately.)

Do you have any explanations for any of the name movement above? If so, please comment!

P.S. Here’s the SSA’s table of baby names that increased in rank from 2017 to 2018. The top boy names on their list are Genesis, Saint, and Baker.

Popular Baby Names in Queensland, 2018

According to the Queensland Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, the most popular baby names in the Australian state in 2018 were Charlotte and Oliver.

Here are Queensland’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2018:

Girl Names
1. Charlotte, 408 baby girls
2. Ava, 350
3. Isla, 312
4. Olivia, 306
5. Amelia, 283
6. Mia, 261
7. Harper, 259
8. Willow, 253
9. Grace, 229
10. Evelyn, 225

Boy Names
1. Oliver, 510 baby boys
2. William, 417
3. Jack, 387
4. Noah, 373
5. Henry, 301
6. Harrison, 285
7. Thomas, 271
8. Leo, 260
9. Archer, 259
10. Theodore, 254

In the girls’ top 10, Willow replaces Ivy (now ranked 17th).

In the boys’ top 10, Leo, Archer and Theodore replace Hunter (now 11th), Hudson (12th), and James (17th).

In 2017, the top two names were the same.

Sources: Top 100 Baby Names, Charlotte reigns supreme: Queensland’s top baby names revealed

Babies Named for Instagram Filters?

instagram, filters, baby names

I started posting on Instagram recently. Though I haven’t used the filters much, seeing them in the app reminded me of something: Babycenter.com claimed, back in late 2015, that Instagram filter names were influencing baby names. And the clickbaity claim was (of course) picked up by various media outlets: Time, People, Vanity Fair, US Weekly, TechCrunch, Mashable, etc.

But the BabyCenter.com folks (who still think Gollum is a baby name, amazingly) weren’t basing their claims on any sort of real-life baby name usage data. They were apparently just making assumptions based on their own website metrics.

In any case…it’s now 2019, and we do have access to usage data for 2015 (not to mention 2016, and 2017). So let’s use this data to determine whether or not their claim is true.

I analyzed the data for 44 names in total: 43 from filters — most current, several retired — plus the name “Lux,” which technically refers to a photo enhancement tool, not a filter. Zeroing in on usage from 2010 (the year Instagram was launched) to 2017, I noticed that…

  • 28 filter names did not see higher usage as baby names:
    • 20 had no SSA data to work with (1977, Crema, Charmes, Clarendon, Dogpatch, Early Bird, Gingham, Ginza, Hefe, Inkwell, Lo-Fi, Mayfair, Nashville, Poprocket, Skyline, Slumber, Stinson, Sutro, Toaster, X-Pro II)
    • 6 saw a decrease in usage (Aden, Brannan, Brooklyn, Kelvin, Reyes, Sierra)
    • 2 saw little/no change in usage (Ludwig, Rise)
  • 16 filter names did see higher usage as baby names:

So which, if any, of the 16 names above increased in usage because of Instagram?

Some of them, like trendy Hudson and Willow, were already on the rise by 2010. So it’s hard to know if these names were influenced at all by recent pop culture, let alone the app specifically. (Though that Juno-jump does seem significant.)

Others are associated with more than just a filter. Vesper was a Bond Girl, for instance, and Juno was a movie. So, even if Instagram was a factor, it was one of several. (BabyCenter.com’s original write-up from 2015 doesn’t even acknowledge this, e.g., “The Instagram-inspired name Lux…”)

In terms of filters actually influencing names, I think the strongest case can be made for Amaro. It wasn’t already on the rise in 2010, it did become more popular in the Instagram era, and the filter itself (as opposed to the Italian liqueur after which the filter was named) does seem to be the primary pop culture association these days.

On the other hand, Clarendon — despite being the first filter you see inside the app and, accordingly, the most-used filter overall — saw no corresponding uptick in usage on birth certificates, which is telling. (Though perhaps “Amaro” hits a stylistic sweet spot that “Clarendon” misses.)

My verdict? I’d say it’s possible that a handful of Instagram filters influenced real-life baby name usage…but I definitely wouldn’t declare that naming babies after filters was/is some sort of “hot trend,” as BabyCenter.com did.

What are your thoughts on all this? Have you ever met a baby named after an Instagram filter?

Sources: Hottest baby name trends of 2015, Photoshop Actions for Instagram’s “Lost” filters, Five New Filters – Instagram, Instagram adds new Lark, Reyes, and Juno filters, Instagram Introduces New Filter, The 10 Most Used Instagram Filters, Study: The most popular Instagram filters from around the world

Popular Baby Names in North Dakota, 2017

According to North Dakota’s Department of Health, the most popular baby names in the state in 2017 were Emma and Oliver.

Here are North Dakota’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2017:

Girl Names
1. Emma, 64 baby girls
2. Harper, 55
3. Olivia, 47
4. Amelia, 45
5. Ava, 42
6. Abigail, 34
7. Quinn, 29
8. Addison, 28 (3-way tie)
9. Ella, 28 (3-way tie)
10. Evelyn, 28 (3-way tie)

Boy Names
1. Oliver, 63 baby boys
2. Henry, 57
3. Liam, 52
4. Easton, 43 (2-way tie)
5. Noah, 43 (2-way tie)
6. Logan, 41
7. Asher, 40
8. Jack, 39
9. Owen, 38 (2-way tie)
10. Ryker, 38 (2-way tie)

In 2016, the top names were Harper/Olivia and Oliver.

In the girls’ top 10, Abigail and Quinn replace Charlotte and Nora.

In the boys’ top 10, Noah, Logan, Asher, Jack, and Ryker replace William, Mason, James, Wyatt, and Hudson. And Easton is still going strong!

There were also differences between these rankings and the SSA’s 2017 rankings for North Dakota. The SSA data has Ellie and Hazel (instead of Quinn and Addison) in the girls’ top 10, and William (instead of Ryker) in the boys’ top 10.

Source: North Dakota Fast Facts 2017 (pdf)