How popular is the baby name Imogen in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Imogen and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Imogen.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Imogen

Number of Babies Named Imogen

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Imogen

Popular Baby Names in Western Australia, 2014

According to data from the Registry of Births, Deaths & Marriages, the most popular baby names in Western Australia in 2014 were Emily and Oliver.

Here are WA’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2014:

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Emily, 204 baby girls
2. Ava, 199
3. Charlotte, 186
4. Olivia, 181
5. Amelia and Mia, 180 each (tie)
6. Ella, 171
7. Isla, 166
8. Sophie, 164
9. Chloe, 162
10. Grace, 157
1. Oliver, 254 baby boys
2. Jack, 239
3. Noah, 216
4. William, 198
5. Lucas, 183
6. Thomas, 182
7. James, 175
8. Ethan, 170
9. Liam and Jacob, 147 each (tie)
10. Mason, 146

The girls’ top 50 includes Zara (18th), Evie (19th), Imogen (23rd), Indiana (39th) and Indi (49th).

The boys’ top 50 includes Harrison (16th), Jaxon (21st), Flynn (40th), Archer (41st) and Jai (48th).

One article also noted that Frozen name Elsa “saw a small, but noticeable, boost from three in 2013 to 17 last year.”

Here are Western Australia’s rankings for 2013 and 2012.

Sources: Popular Baby Names – Registry of Births, Deaths & Marriages, Oliver and Emily WA’s most popular baby names for 2014 while Disney’s Frozen inspires some parents


40 Pairs of Baby Names for Girl-Boy Twins

girl-boy twins

A few weeks ago, The Stir posted a list of 20 pairs of baby names for girl-boy twins.

The problem with their list? Each matchy-matchy name-pair started with the same first letter.

Yes, most parents gravitate toward patterns when it comes to naming twins. This has been confirmed by at least one study and is easy to see when you peruse the (now discontinued) lists of popular twin names.

But should they?

No. Child development experts say twins should have dissimilar first names.

So I thought I’d improve upon their list by separating the pairings and giving each of the 40 names a new, non-matchy partner — different first letter, different ending, different number of syllables.

Too Matchy? Much Better!
Hazel & Hugo
Emma & Evan
Madison & Mason
Taylor & Tyler
Vivienne & Val
Ava & Alexander
Chloe & Caleb
Sophia & Samuel
Eva & Ethan
Penelope & Pax
Savannah & Sebastian
Lily & Luke
Dylan & Dean
Naomi & Noah
Imogen & Isaac
Juliette & James
Christina & Christian
Grace & Gavin
Avery & Aiden
Claire & Clive
Hazel & Benjamin
Emma & Charles
Madison & Liam
Taylor & Grant
Vivienne & Phillip
Ava & Carl
Chloe & Gabriel
Sophia & Owen
Eva & Jack
Penelope & Duncan
Savannah & Zane
Lily & Cash
Dylan & Matthias
Naomi & Joseph
Imogen & Grey
Juliette & Simon
Christina & Thomas
Grace & Dominic
Avery & Beau
Claire & Julian
Hugo & Adelaide
Evan & Sabrina
Mason & Aria
Tyler & Addison
Val & Edie
Alexander & Daphne
Caleb & Lydia
Samuel & Hannah
Ethan & Amelia
Pax & Kira
Sebastian & Gemma
Luke & Maya
Dean & Harper
Noah & Abigail
Isaac & Johanna
James & Tabitha
Christian & Veronica
Gavin & Bree
Aiden & Katrina
Clive & Odette

Not only are the pairs in the middle and on the right smarter choices in terms of child development, but they’re also less likely to cause embarrassment and/or confusion. Unlike, say, Christina and Christian.

What are your favorite non-matchy baby names for girl-boy twins?

P.S. Hate to nit-pick, but…the Stir post also included several bogus definitions. Caleb means “devotion to God”? Nope, Caleb means dog.

Source: 20 Pairs of Baby Names for Twins of the Opposite Sex
Image: Adapted from Kinley and Liam Photos (18) by love_K_photo under CC BY 2.0.

Most Popular Baby Names in Western Australia, 2012

The most popular baby names in Western Australia were announced a few days ago.

According to the WA Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, the winners were Noah for boys and Charlotte for girls.

Here are Western Australia’s top 20 girl names and top 20 boy names of 2012:

Baby Girl Names Baby Boy Names
1. Charlotte
2. Olivia
3. Ruby
4. Emily
5. Sophie
6. Chloe
7. Ella
8. Amelia
9. Ava
10. Mia
11. Grace
12. Isabella
13. Lily
14. Isla
15. Sienna
16. Zoe
17. Sophia
18. Matilda
19. Hannah
20. Emma
1. Noah
2. Jack
3. William
4. Ethan
5. James
6. Lucas
7. Jacob
8. Liam
9. Oliver
10. Thomas
11. Joshua [2-way tie]
11. Cooper [2-way tie]
13. Mason [2-way tie]
13. Samuel [2-way tie]
15. Lachlan
16. Riley
17. Max
18. Benjamin
19. Daniel [2-way tie]
19. Jaxon [2-way tie]

The girl names Imogen, Zara and Indiana and the boy names Hudson, Kai and Declan were among the top 50.

Here are Western Australia’s top names of 2007, if you’d like to compare.

And do you want to see WA’s top ten lists going all the way back to 1930? Just click the “search past years” link.

Source: Noah and Charlotte are WA’s most popular baby names for 2012

Most Popular Baby Names in Northern Ireland, 2012

The most popular baby names in Northern Ireland were announced a little while ago.

According to the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency, the #1 names were Jack for boys and Sophie for girls.

Here are Northern Ireland’s provisional top 20 girl names and top 20 boy names of 2012:

Baby Girl Names Baby Boy Names
1. Sophie
2. Emily
3. Grace
4. Amelia
5. Jessica
6. Lucy
7. Sophia
8. Katie
9. Eva
10. Aoife
11. Chloe
12. Lily
13. Ella
14. Mia
15. Ellie
16. Anna [tie]
16. Emma [tie]
16. Olivia [tie]
19. Erin
20. Sarah
1. Jack
2. James
3. Daniel
4. Harry
5. Charlie
6. Ethan
7. Matthew
8. Ryan
9. Riley
10. Noah
11. Adam
12. Joshua
13. Jacob
14. Thomas
15. Conor
16. Jake [tie]
16. Oliver [tie]
18. Dylan
19. Alfie
20. Mason

The highest climbers within the top 20 lists were Aoife (15th to 10th) and Riley (18th to 9th).

Other high climbers were Bobby (124th to 59th), Blake (111th to 71st) and Olly (131st to 93rd) for boy names, and Miley (135th to 79th) and Layla (135th to 83rd) for girl names.

[Very curious about Bobby! Can anybody explain that one?]

Names that decreased in popularity include Calum (down 93 spots), Padraig (-49) and Conan (-28) on the boys’ list, and Ciara (-53), Victoria (-49) and Julia (-48) on the girls’ list.

Finally, here are some of the more unusual names registered in 2012:

Girl Names Boy Names
Aibhailia, Anna-bell, Blathnait, Cait-erin, Caollaidhe, Clodagh-rose, Clover-leoni, Connemara, Haianabragadiska, Iretenevesho, Napsugar, Poppyanna, Scarlett-imogen, Shammahwisdom, Tuleighza Boen-rua, Caelum, Conghaile, Connlaodh, Everley-eric, Gavin-og, Iarfhlaith, Iggi, Kekeli, Kyzler, McCoist, Naoise, Rolex, Sean-og, Setanta, Shea-pearse, Somhairle, Steven-og, Uate, Ugnius

Those “og” endings on some of the boy names are the Irish word Óg, which means “young” or “junior.” It can be used after girl names, too.

Here are Northern Ireland’s top baby names of 2007, if you’d like to compare.

Source: NISRA

Baby Name Needed for the Sibling of Atticus

A reader named Jessica has a son named Atticus and is expecting her second baby at the end of February. Here’s what she says:

We don’t know the gender of this baby, but we have already agreed on a boy’s name (which I can’t share–sorry!–because my husband and I have agreed not to tell anyone), but we have yet to agree on a girl’s name. We’ve come up with several ideas (Annaliese, Piper, Penelope, Evelyn), but nothing seems to fit. Generally, we like less common names with a bit of history to them. Definitely nothing trendy or “made up.” Also, no names starting with a “B” since the child’s last name will begin with a “B” and I’m not keen on the combination. We are pretty flexible on middle names, so I’m not worried about that. Hope you can help! Thanks!

Here are some ideas to kick things off:

Anastasia
Camille
Celia
Daphne
Genevieve
Helen
Imogen
Ione
Linnea
Luna
Millicent
Naomi
Phronie (Sophronia)
Pippa (Philippa)
Rhea
Romy (Rosemary)
Rosalind
Sabine
Tamar
Venetia
Winifred

Do you like any of these with Atticus? What other girl names would you suggest to Jessica?

Baby Name Needed for the Sister of Copeland

A reader named Lisa is expecting her second daughter a couple of weeks and needs some name assistance. Her first daughter is Copeland Rhine. Lisa’s main predicament is this:

[H]ow do I find a strong unique vintage name for this second precious girlie that will not wilt next to a strong name like Copeland Rhine?

And here are some other questions and points Lisa brought up:

  • “Our goal is not to have their names competing for placement but complimenting each other.”
  • “We do not want to be boxed in on unisex or surname first names.”
  • “I have been gravitating towards Sojourner Bliss or Sojourner Mercy (Sophie for short) but that is all I have and my husband is not sold on it nor on a stronger masculine name.”
  • “My husband really loves Evangeline yet he is not wanting to use it because it is becoming so popular. We both love the idea of Evie as a nickname.”
  • “I really want to honor three people in my family but all three would not wish their name on anyone: Leona, Gertrude and Lorraine. Are there any derived names that I could use?” [Other family names she mentioned are Cornelia, Josephine, Ester, Rosemary, Carmelita, Trinia (Trijntje), Johannes, Sophia, Evelientje, Alice (called Ollie), Francis, Felicia and Blanche.]

The baby’s surname will be a 2-syllable name that starts with D and also includes a z-sound. It’s somewhat similar to De Souza.

So the challenge is to find “strong unique vintage” names that work with Copeland, but that won’t lock Lisa’s family into surnames or unisex names. And to try to get a family connection in there as well.

I think Evangeline is a great idea, actually. It’s strong, vintage, and neither a surname nor a unisex name. And both Lisa and her husband like the nickname Evie. Seems like the only thing holding them back is the popularity.

Yes, Evangeline has become slightly popular recently. It’s been back in the top 1,000 since 2006. But let’s put that into context. Over 2,000,000 baby girls were born last year, and only 735 of them were named Evangeline. That’s a very small percentage. (But if it’s really that bothersome, there’s always Evangelina, which is still well out of the top 1,000.)

I’m not a big fan of Sojourner. It’s strong, and unique, and not a surname…but it’s not feminine, and it’s not what I’d call vintage, even if Sojourner Truth was a well-known 19th-century woman. I’d worry about teasing, especially with a noun-middle like Bliss or Mercy. And I think naming a third child (of either gender) after Copeland and Sojourner would be tricky.

Sophie seems like it would be an awkward nickname for Sojourner. It’s so different from Sojourner that it strikes me as more of a cover-name than a nickname–as if Sojourner were just too strong or strange to work as an everyday name.

Leona, Gertrude and Lorraine…the most interesting way I could think of to combine them was to look for names that feature their first letters (L, G, L) such as Nigella, Allegra and Gillian.

Here are a few other name ideas that came to mind:

Acacia
Adelaide
Amandine
Anais
Anneliese
Antonia
Aquila
Artemis
Astrid
Augusta
Aurelia
Aurora
Damaris
Delphina
Demetria
Freya
Ginevra
Harriet
Honora
Imogen
Ione
Isadora
Leocadia
Lucasta
Lucretia
Melosa
Merit
Mehetabel
Minerva
Morgana
Muriel
Nelle
Penelope
Petra
Sophronia
Sunniva
Theodosia/Theda
Thora
Venetia
Vera

Some are related to the family names Lisa mentioned (e.g. Adelaide/Alice, Sophronia/Sophia).

Which of the above names do you like best for the sister of Copeland? What other names would you suggest to Lisa?

Baby Name Stories at Appellation Mountain

Abby over at Appellation Mountain began posting her readers’ baby name stories just a few weeks ago and already has a very cool collection going:

If you have a baby name story to share, get in touch with Abby!