How popular is the baby name Indigo in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Indigo and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Indigo.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Indigo

Number of Babies Named Indigo

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Indigo

Name Quotes for the Weekend, #2

From Jessie Jensen of the blog Bloggity Blog:

A few months ago I sat in front of an older woman on a flight who was cheerfully explaining to her seatmate that she was on her way to visit her new grandson. When the lady asked what the sweet little dear’s name was, the grandma clammed up and replied reservedly, “Slate”. To some degree, his name diminished her joy. (It came out later that Slate was the younger sibling of Crimson, Indigo, and Sage.)

From a Daily Mail article about life in ancient Rome:

In fact, one of the major sources of [Roman] slaves was probably these thrown-away babies. You can tell that from the names people gave them. One common name was Copreus — it translates as ‘found on the dung-heap’. This probably happened more to baby girls than to baby boys.

From John Hewitt of the site PoeWar:

Because my wife is less concerned about a boy being taken “seriously”, most of our girl choices so far are conservative, while the boy names are a little more adventurous.

Interesting; the opposite of what parents typically do.

From a Forbes article about the Social Security crisis:

Less than 2 percent of Social Security’s budget is spent on administration, most of which goes toward producing the list of most popular baby names.

From Greg Ross of the blog Futility Closet:

But my favourite example is a story told by the American linguist Charles Hockett, who reports that at least one Filipino father, during the American occupation of the Philippines, named his son Ababís — after the patron saint of the United States. But no such saint exists. So what happened?

Well, before the Americans arrived, the Philippines were a Spanish colony, and Spanish was widely spoken. In Spanish, the word for ‘saint’, when it occurs in a male saint’s name, is San — hence all those California place names like San Francisco, San José and San Diego. The Filipino father had noticed that American soldiers, in moments of stress, tended to call upon their saint by exclaiming San Ababís! — or something like that.

– Robert Lawrence Trask, Language: The Basics, 1999

Another from Greg Ross of Futility Closet:

“I once had a student named Usmail, which I at first thought was some Hispanic version of Ishmael,” writes CUNY linguist Leonard R.N. Ashley. “It transpired that he had been named for the only contact his family in a remote Puerto Rican village enjoyed with the outside world, the red-white-and-blue truck that came frequently and had painted on its side US Mail.”

Here are more names like Usmail.

And here’s the first Name Quotes for the Weekend post, from a few weeks ago.

Once You Go Unique, Is There No Going Back?

Echo has four siblings: Clint (for Clint Eastwood), Milo, Disney (in tribute to Disney films) and Dali (after Salvador Dalí).

She’s also a mom. Her two children are Pharrell and Lovella. She says, “I had to carry on the tradition of unusual names–and I’m sure the rest of my family will do the same.”

Her comment made me curious. Are adults who grew up surrounded by unique names more likely to give their own children unique names?

Here are a couple of case studies:

  • Frank Zappa’s four children are Moon, Dweezil, Ahmet (after Ahmet Ertegun) and Diva. His grandkids are Mathilda, Zola and Ceylon.
  • Joaquin Phoenix’s sisters and (late) brother are River, Rain, Liberty and Summer. His nieces and nephews are Jonas, Rio, Indigo, Scarlette, Indiana and Atticus.

What are your thoughts?

Source: What’s in a name? Ask the Beavers

Don’t Commit to a Name Pattern Until You Read These 3 Tips

Humans love patterns. Just look last year’s list of popular twin names:

Jacob & Joshua
Daniel & David
Jayden & Jordan
Ethan & Evan
Taylor & Tyler
Gabriella & Isabella
Isaac & Isaiah
Madison & Morgan
Elijah & Isaiah
Ella & Emma

Eight pairs start with the same letter. Seven have the same rhythm. Another seven end with the same letter (and many of these nearly rhyme).

For twins and other multiples, sticking with a name pattern is easy. You know the number of children and their genders ahead of time.

But what if you want a name pattern for an entire sibling set? That can make things tricky. You don’t know how many children you’ll have, or what their genders will be. You also don’t know how your tastes may change over time.

If you’re thinking about a name pattern to cover all of your kids, here are three pieces of advice to consider before you begin:

Don’t lock yourself into something limiting.
Let’s say you like flowers. You have a daughter and you name her Lily. You have another daughter and name her Rose. Then another, Jasmine. And then a fourth, but…you don’t like any other flower names. Iris? Too old. Poppy? Too young. Zinnia? Too weird. Amaryllis will never be spelled correctly. And Daisy is the golden retriever down the street.

Or, let’s say you have a son named Alexander. Then you have another boy, and you decide to name him Xavier so they both have that X in common. Then baby #3–a little girl–comes along. Well, you can’t do Alexis–that’s too close to Alexander. You won’t go near Maxine because you fear maxi pad jokes. Roxanne reminds you too much of that song. Xena reminds you too much of that show. And Beatrix makes you think of rabbits.

When you play chess, you have to think ahead several moves. Look at sibling name patterns the same way. Think ahead as many kids as possible. If you can think of 10 or more usable names that fit the pattern, it’s probably a safe pattern. If you can’t, the pattern may be too limiting to be sustainable.

Consider the pros and cons of visibility.
Have you heard of the Duggars? They have nearly 20 kids, and all of those kids have a J-name. This type of name pattern is one of the easiest to spot. (Especially in large families.)

But name patterns don’t have to be obvious. Let’s say your children will have a whole bunch of aunts and uncles you’d like to honor with baby names. You make a list of their names and simply pick from this list as you have children. In this case, the pattern (aunt and uncle names) is so subtle that it’s basically a family secret.

Here are some example name patterns, ranging from blatant to barely there:

Very conspicuous: First letters (Lou, Leah, Len, Lila)
Rhyme (Aiden, Hayden, Kaeden, Graydon)
Like-sounds (Meredith, Heath, Edith, Griffith)
Theme (Indigo, Scarlet, Tawny, Cyan)
Kinda conspicuous: Alphabetical (Alfred, Bea, Chester, Diana)
Rhythm (Augustus, Miranda, Dakota, Lorenzo)
Source (Juliet, Yorick, Orlando, Cordelia)
Origin (Duncan, Angus, Una, Lachlan)
Inconspicuous: Number of letters (Jason, Frank, Kelly, Alexa)
Spread-out alphabetical (Brian, Elaine, Laura, Paul)
Letter in common (Abigail, Sebastian, Tobias, Isabella)
Chain [last letters into first letters] (Michael, Lauren, Nora, Andrew)

How can you test the visibility of a particular pattern? Make a list of names that fit the pattern. Pick two at random and give them to a friend. Ask that friend what the two names have in common. Did she get it on the first try? Was she unable to guess at all? That should give you a good idea about where the pattern would fall on the spectrum.

Avoid sets of names that have an endpoint.
Your first son is Luke. The next is Sky. The next is Walker. And then…surprise! Son #4. Now what–Anakin? Darth? Chewbacca?

If you start off with a discrete set of names, the universe will laugh at you and you will either:

  • not have enough kids, or
  • have too many kids

to match the number of names in the set. Murphy’s Law in action. So don’t tempt fate–stick with an open-ended theme that could end at two names or continue to ten.

What other suggestions would you give to parents considering name patterns?

Source: SSA

Baby Name Needed – Boy and Girl Names for Baby #1

A reader named Sarah is expecting her first baby in several months, and she’d like some baby name suggestions. These are the names she and her husband like so far (girl names are on the left, boy names are on the right).

Benjamin (Benji)

I think they might also like…


What other names would you suggest?

*In Australia, the name Banjo can be traced back to “Waltzing Matilda” poet Andrew “Banjo” Paterson (1864-1941).