How popular is the baby name Iola in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Iola.

The graph will take a few seconds to load, thanks for your patience. (Don't worry, it shouldn't take nine months.) If it's taking too long, try reloading the page.


Popularity of the Baby Name Iola


Posts that Mention the Name Iola

Rare Girl Names from Early Cinema: Letter I

In need of an uncommon girl name with an old-fashioned feel?

Here’s the next installment in the early cinema series: a list of rare female I-names associated with the initial decades of the motion pictures (1910s to 1940s).

For those names that have seen enough usage to appear in the SSA data, I’ve included links to popularity graphs.

*

Ianthe
Ianthe Dorland was a character played by actress Virginia Field in the film The Primrose Path (1934).

  • Usage of the baby name Ianthe.

Idalene
Idalene Nobbin was a character played by actress Colleen Moore in the film The Wall Flower (1922).

Idina
Idina Bland was a character played by actress Fanny Ferrari in the film Passion’s Playground (1920).

  • Usage of the baby name Idina.

Idy
Idy Peters was a character played by actress Irene Rich in the film They Had to See Paris (1929).

  • Usage of the baby name Idy.

Ilani
Ilani was a character played by actress Maria Montez in the film Moonlight in Hawaii (1941).

  • Usage of the baby name Ilani.

Ilanu
Ilanu was a character played by actress Raquel Torres in the film Aloha (1931).

Ilda
Ilda was a character name in multiple films, including Rasputin, the Black Monk (1917) and Darkest Russia (1917).

  • Usage of the baby name Ilda.

Ilka
Ilka Chase was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1960s. She was born in New York in 1905. Ilka was also a character name in multiple films, including Ambassador Bill (1931) and The President’s Mystery (1936).

  • Usage of the baby name Ilka.

Ilma
Ilma was a character name in multiple films, including The Game of Life (short, 1915) and The Seven Pearls (1917).

  • Usage of the baby name Ilma.

Ilona
Ilona Massey was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1950s. She was born in Hungary in 1910. Ilona was also a character name in multiple films, including Ilona (1921) and The Stolen Bride (1927).

  • Usage of the baby name Ilona.

Ilonka
Ilonka was a character played by actress Elena Verdugo in the film House of Frankenstein (1944).

Ilsa
Ilsa Lund was a character played by actress Ingrid Bergman in the film Casablanca (1942).

  • Usage of the baby name Ilsa (which debuted in the data in 1943).

Ilse
Ilse Wagner was a character played by actress Ruth Robinson in the film The Match King (1932).

  • Usage of the baby name Ilse.

Immada
Immada was a character played by actress Laska Winter in the film The Rescue (1929).

Imogene
Imogene was a character name in multiple films, including Retribution (short, 1913) and They Won’t Forget (1937).

Imperia
Imperia was a character played by actress Phyllis Haver in the film Don Juan (1926).

Ina
Ina Claire was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1940s. She was born in Washington, D.C., in 1893. Ina was also a character played by actress Arlette Marchal in the film Forlorn River (1926).

  • Usage of the baby name Ina.

Inah
Inah Dunbar was a character played by actress Ann Forrest in the film Her Decision (1918).

  • Usage of the baby name Inah.

Inda
Independence “Inda” Palmer was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s. She was born in Ohio on July 4, 1853.

  • Usage of the baby name Inda.

Indora
Indora was a character played by actress Colleen Moore in the film The Devil’s Claim (1920).

Inga
Inga was a character played by actress Carol Dempster in the film Isn’t Life Wonderful (1924).

  • Usage of the baby name Inga.

Iola
Iola was a character name in multiple films, including Iola’s Promise (short, 1912) and The Heart of a Lion (1917).

  • Usage of the baby name Iola.

Iolante
Iolante was a character played by actress Maude Fealy in the short film King Rene’s Daughter (1913).

Iolanthe
Iolanthe McSwatt was a character played by actress Flora Finch in the short film There’s Music in the Hair (1913).

Ione
Ione Holmes was an actress who appeared in films in the 1920s. She was born in the U.S. in 1890. Ione was also a character name in multiple films, including The Flirt and the Bandit (short, 1913) and The Last Days of Pompeii (1926).

  • Usage of the baby name Ione.

Iphigenie
Iphigenie Castiglioni was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1960s. She was born in Austria-Hungary in 1895.

Iras
Iras was a character name in multiple films, including Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ (1925) and Cleopatra (1934).

  • Usage of the baby name Iras.

Irena
Irena was a character name in multiple films, including The Fall of the Romanoffs (1917) and Mark of the Vampire (1935).

  • Usage of the baby name Irena.

Irenya
Irenya was a character played by actress Marjorie Daw in the short film The Unafraid (1915).

Irmingarde
Princess Irmingarde was a character played by actress Lillian Drew in the short film Every Inch a King (1914).

Isambeau
Isambeau was a character played by actress Lillian Leighton in the film Joan the Woman (1916).

Ishya
Ishya was a character played by actress Burnu Acquanetta in the film Arabian Nights (1942).

  • Usage of the baby name Ishya.

Isobelle
Princess Isobelle was a character played by actress Mary Fuller in the short film The Master Mummer (1915).

Isola
Isola was a character name in multiple films, including The Nightingale (1914) and Thunder Island (1921).

  • Usage of the baby name Isola.

Isolla
Isolla was a character played by actress Marion Leonard in the short film The Awakening of Donna Isolla (1914).

Istra
Princess Istra was a character played by actress Marguerite Courtot in the film Bound and Gagged (1919).

Ivis
Ivis was a character name in multiple films, including The Glorious Lady (1919) and Three Live Ghosts (1922).

  • Usage of the baby name Ivis.

Izette
Izette was a character played by actress Lillian Leighton in the short film A Detective’s Strategy (1912).

*

Which of the above I-names do you like best?

Source: IMDb

Game: Add 3 Girl Names to this 1910 List…

In 1910, the Boston-based publisher H. M. Caldwell Co. ran the following ad for its “My Own Name” series of books in American Motherhood magazine.

names from 1910

It is the purpose of these charming little books to tell girls all about their names, information about the name, its origin, the name in history, the name in poetry, fiction and romance is given, also notable namesakes past and present.

It wasn’t much of a series, though, as there were only 25 names to choose from:

  1. Alice (ranked 10th nationally in 1910)
  2. Annie (19th)
  3. Bertha (33rd)
  4. Charlotte (99th)
  5. Dorothy (4th)
  6. Edith (35th)
  7. Eleanor (55th)
  8. Elizabeth (7th)
  9. Fanny (391st)
  10. Gertrude (26th)
  11. Gladys (15th)
  12. Helen (2nd)
  13. Isabel (176th)
  14. Jane (116th)
  15. Katherine (57th)
  16. Lucy (75th)
  17. Margaret (3rd)
  18. Marion (59th)
  19. Marjorie (68th)
  20. Mary (1st)
  21. Mildred (8th)
  22. Nellie (51st)
  23. Ruth (5th)
  24. Sarah (40th)
  25. Winifred (185th)

Clearly three more names could have fit on that last line (next to Winifred), so let’s turn this into a game. Which three girl names would you add to this list? That is, give us three names you like that would also be logical additions to this list, given the time period. For instance, I think I’d add Iola, Della, and Bonnie. How about you?

(If you want to access the national rankings for 1910, click over to the SSA’s site and scroll down to “Popular Names by Birth Year.”)

The NYPL Lions, Patience and Fortitude

nypl, lions, 1911
The NYPL lions on opening day (1911).

Two marble lions have been guarding the entrance of the New York Public Library since it opened in May of 1911. These days, the lions are usually called Patience and Fortitude. But over the years they’ve had various nicknames, including a number of male/female nicknames (despite the fact that both lions are clearly male). Some examples:

  • Ainsley and Rollo
  • Leo Astor and Leo Lenox
    • The NYPL was created by combining the Astor and Lenox libraries.
  • Lord Lenox and Lady Astor
  • Leo and Leonora
  • Peter Cooper and Horace Greeley (famous for their whiskers, among other things)
  • Plato and Lily
  • Pyramus and Thisbe
  • Uptown and Downtown

The NYPL attributes the “Patience” and “Fortitude” to former NYC mayor Fiorello LaGuardia, who was in office from 1934 to 1945.

Mayor LaGuardia…nicknamed The New York Public Library’s lions Patience and Fortitude for the qualities he felt New Yorkers needed to survive the Great Depression.

While it’s a nice story, I can’t find any record of LaGuardia suggesting that the library lions be called by those particular nicknames. He did, however, use the phrase “Patience and Fortitude” repeatedly in his weekly WWII-era radio talks (1942-1945) on WNYC. So LaGuardia may be the ultimate source of the names, but it’s more likely that his radio audience began associating the two words with the two cats during the 1940s — after the Depression was over.

Speaking of Fiorello…the lions were carved by the Piccirilli Brothers, immigrants from Italy. The six brothers were named Ferrucio, Attilio, Furio, Masaniello, Orazio, and Getulio, plus they had a kid sister named Iola (according to the census).

Do you like the nicknames Patience and Fortitude for the lions? If not, what names would you prefer?

Sources:

Image: N.Y. Library on Opening Day – LOC

Popular Baby Names in Quebec, 2015

According to data from Retraite Québec, the most popular baby names in Quebec in 2015 were Emma and Thomas/William (tied).

Here are the province’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2015:

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Emma, 615 baby girls
2. Léa, 535
3. Olivia, 475
4. Alice, 471
5. Florence, 460
6. Zoe, 429
7. Chloe, 398
8. Beatrice, 390
9. Charlotte, 381
10. Rosalie, 350
1. Thomas, 754 baby boys
2. William, 754 baby boys
3. Jacob, 663
4. Liam, 661
5. Félix, 638
6. Nathan, 630
7. Samuel, 583
8. Logan, 576
9. Alexis, 554
10. Noah, 537

In 2015, Emma replaced Lea as the top girl name, William joined Thomas as the top boy name, Beatrice replaced Charlie in the girls’ top 10, and Noah replaced Olivier in the boy’s top 10. (Here are the 2014 rankings.)

[UPDATE, May 2017 – The Quebec rankings for 2015 have since been updated and it looks like William has pulled ahead of Thomas to become the sole #1 name.]

Of all 9,096 girl names on Quebec’s list in 2015, 74.5% of them were used a single time. Here are some of the unique girl names:

  • Allegresse – the French word allégresse means “joy, elation.”
  • Angelhephzibah
  • Brightness
  • Cathalaya-Skuessi
  • Clerilda
  • Confiance – the French word confiance means “confidence, trust.”
  • Doxalyah
  • Etky
  • Eubenice
  • Evlly
  • Exaucee – the French verb exaucer means “to grant a wish.”
  • Flory Comfort
  • Garance – the French word garance refers to a shade of red created from the root of the madder plant.
  • Glad Marie
  • Glody
  • Graytchelle Mayssa – a Gretchen + Rachel smoosh?
  • Greasy-Elizabeth
  • Happy Moussoni
  • Janiphee
  • Kalliah
  • Kzy
  • Luneve – reminds me of Leneve.
  • M Mah Bourgeois
  • Mingolou Oracle-Kidj
  • Nebraska
  • Nina-Symone
  • Nomad
  • Paphaelle – typo?
  • Poema
  • Praise Peter
  • Protegee
  • Relilah – typo?
  • Shamash-Cleodaine
  • Skodrina
  • Symphony Melody
  • Uqittuk
  • Uri Wonder
  • Winola – this one reminds me of early 20th-century America.
  • Zoalie
  • Zhya

Of all 7,920 boy names on Quebec’s list in 2015, 76.5% of them were bestowed just once. Here are some of the unique boy names:

  • Anakyn
  • Appamatta – the Pali word appamatta means “diligent, careful.”
  • Aunix
  • Axeliam
  • Bleart
  • Bradley Prague
  • Brady Bullet – this one reminds me of modern America (e.g. Shooter, Trigger).
  • Cedrick Wolynsky
  • Chrysolithe – a type of gem (a.k.a. peridot).
  • Cirrus
  • Dejgaard
  • Diamond-Heliodor – two more gems.
  • Drake Luke
  • Dublin
  • Dugaillekens
  • Elliottt – the only triple T’s in the U.S. data so far are Mattthew and Britttany. Probably typos, but you never know.
  • Eviee
  • Exauce – the masculine form of Exaucee.
  • Ezzeldeen
  • Garnet – another gem.
  • Glovacky
  • Gningnery Yoshua
  • Hervenslaire
  • Icky Neymar
  • Iola Stevie
  • Jimmy Johnny
  • Jyceton
  • Jyfr
  • Kbees
  • Keylord
  • Ludo-Vyck
  • Mathis-Adorable
  • Messy
  • Michael Antares – reminds me of an earlier Antares.
  • Napesis – the Cree word napesis means “boy” or “little boy.”
  • Nyquist
  • Perlcy
  • Rowdy Chance
  • Skogen
  • Sosereyvatanack
  • Tysaiah Jay
  • Whidjley Densly
  • Woobs Therly
  • Zogan

For more sets of rankings, check out the name rankings category.

Source: Retraite Québec – List of Baby Names

The Musical Baby Name Anona

anona, sheet music, 1903Music has introduced dozens of new names (like Rhiannon, Monalisa, and Alize) to the baby name charts.

I believed for a long time that Dardanella was the first of these introduced-by-song names. It bounded onto the charts in 1920 — before the widespread usage of radio and record players, impressively. This must make it one-of-a-kind, right?

Nope. I’ve since gone back over the early name lists and discovered a musical name that debuted on the charts a whopping 17 years earlier, in 1903. That name is Anona:

  • 1908: 8 baby girls named Anona
  • 1907: 6 baby girls named Anona
  • 1906: 12 baby girls named Anona
  • 1905: 22 baby girls named Anona
  • 1904: 22 baby girls named Anona
  • 1903: 7 baby girls named Anona [debut]
  • 1902: unlisted

The SSA’s early name lists are relatively unreliable, so here are the Social Security Death Index (SSDI) numbers for the same time-span:

  • 1908: 24 baby girls named Anona (SSDI)
  • 1907: 24 baby girls named Anona (SSDI)
  • 1906: 38 baby girls named Anona (SSDI)
  • 1905: 48 baby girls named Anona (SSDI)
  • 1904: 57 baby girls named Anona (SSDI)
  • 1903: 18 baby girls named Anona (SSDI)
  • 1902: 1 baby girl named Anona (SSDI)

The song “Anona” was published in mid-1903. It was written by Vivian Grey, which was a pseudonym for either presidential niece Mabel McKinley or prolific songwriter Robert A. King, sources don’t agree.

The song became very popular and was recorded multiple times. (Here’s Henry Burr’s version, for instance.) This is the chorus:

My sweet Anona, in Arizona,
There is no other maid I’d serenade;
By camp-fires gleaming, of you I’m dreaming,
Anona, my sweet Indian maid.

So-called “Indian love songs” were becoming trendy around this time, thanks to the success of the song “Hiawatha” (1902). Here are a few more that, like “Anona,” have titles that were also used as female names in the songs:

  • “Kick-apoo” (1904)
  • “Oneonta” (1904)
  • “Tammany” (1905)
  • “Silverheels” (1905)
  • “Iola” (1906)
  • “Arrah Wanna” (1906)
    • Dozens of babies were named Arrahwanna, Arrah-Wanna, and Arrah Wanna after this song was published.
  • “Sitka” (1909)
  • “Ogalalla” (1909)

What do you think of the baby name Anona? Would you ever consider using it?

Source: Native Americans: The Noble Savage: The Indian Princess