How popular is the baby name Jae in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Jae and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Jae.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Jae

Number of Babies Named Jae

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Jae

Baby Name Trends in South Korea

popular baby names in south korea, 2008-2013
The top baby names in S. Korea are Min-jun (boys) and Seo-yeon (girls).

In South Korea, parents are slowly moving away from traditional methods of choosing baby names.

Name decisions used to be made either by a grandfather or by a professional baby namer (who would use the Chinese zodiac to spot “weaknesses” in the baby’s fate and choose a name to help counter those weaknesses). While many parents still consult with professionals, the belief that choosing a name via astrology can affect a baby’s fate is less common than it once was.

So how are parents in Korea choosing names these days? In various ways…

  • Some are choosing names based on how easy they are to pronounce in English, avoiding tricky Korean syllables such as “Eun” and “Eo.”
  • Some are looking to pop culture (especially celebrities and reality TV) for names.
  • Some are taking a more creative route, turning Korean words into names. (One woman interviewed by Arirang News mentioned her son’s name was Ara, from the Korean word for “sea.”)
  • Some are going for a unisex sound with syllables like “ji” and “bin.”

According to Arirang News, the most popular baby names in South Korea from 2008 through most of 2013 were Seo-yeon for girls and Min-jun for boys:

Top Girl Names Top Boy Names
1. Seo-yeon
2. Ji-won
3. Seo-young
4. Su-yeon
5. Seo-hyeon
6. Min-seo
7. Min-jeong
8. Min-ju
9. Ji-yun
10. Yu-jin
1. Min-jun
2. Ji-hun
3. Hyun-wu
4. Min-seong
5. Dong-hyeon
6. Jeong-wu
7. Do-hyeon
8. Hyeon-jun
9. Geon-wu
10. Min-jae

Sources: Baby-naming in Korea: What are the most popular names?, The Most Popular Baby Names in Korea, South Korea: parents pick names that foreigners can pronounce (h/t Onomastics.co.uk)


Unique Names in Scotland – Atom, Divine-Grace, Olaoluwapolorimi, Rhythm

Yesterday I posted about the top baby names in Scotland for 2007, so today I thought I’d mention some of the unique baby names. :)

Approximately 6,500 baby names were bestowed in Scotland in 2007. Of these, about 1,700 boy names and 2,400 girl names were unique (as in, given to only one child). Here’s a sampling of those unique names:

Boy Names Girl Names
Atom
Brydon-Craig
Crombie
Daood
Eriz
Favour
Gurardass
Heini
Ieuan
Jock
Kurtis-Jae
Loche
Montague
Nader
Olaoluwapolorimi
Promise
Qirui
Ruslan
Stephenjunior
Taliesin
Ubayd
Vithujan
Wesley-Scott
Xabier
Yadgor
Zaineddine
Amberly
Babyjane
Chardonnay
Divine-Grace
Eliska
Fizzah
Gracealexandra
Heaven-Leigh
Irmak
Jasmina
Kiranpreet
Luighsighe
Misty-Blue
Noor-El-Iman
Oluwateniolami
Possum
Queeneffa
Rhythm
Sheignneth
Tianqi
Uxia
VJay
Wezi
Xanthia
Yolwandle
Zalfa

To see more, download the full list directly from the General Registrar Office for Scotland.

How Do You Feel About Your Name, Jae?

“I adore my name because it’s unique and has an amazing meaning within my family,” says Jae, a 20-year-old from rural northern Alabama. “I can’t imagine any other name fitting me.”

Jae’s name is simple, but unique: it has never once ranked among the top 1,000 baby names in the United States. (Two homonyms have managed to make the list, though — the male name Jay and the female name Jaye.)

What does Jae like about her name?

I love my name because it’s short and snappy, for one thing (my parents always say it yells well, or joke that I thought my name was Jae! with an exclamation point for years). I’ve never met another girl named Jae, either, although lots of people give me compliments on my name when I introduce myself. Mostly, though, I love my name for the meaning it has. My older brother (Jeffrey Alan) died two years before I was born, when he was eleven, and when my parents unexpectedly became pregnant again late in life, they chose to give me for my first name his initials: JAE.

My middle name, Katherine, also has a family origin from my mother Kathy and my maternal grandmother Kathleen. Had I been a boy, I would have been Jae Timothy — Timothy being my brother’s imaginary friend! I think I definitely got off lucky in that regard, both because I like Katherine better than Timothy, and the spelling Jae looks more feminine. Also, when I have children, I’d like to continue the tradition of my middle name, and name my daughter a variant of Katherine as well — my favorite currently is Katrin.

What does she not like about her name?

Most people, on hearing my name, think I’m a boy. According to statistics, I should either spell it Jay and be a man born in the 1960s, or spell it Jae and be a boy with Korean heritage, since my spelling seems to be fairly common in that culture. No one can spell my name correctly the first time, either — I get Jay, Jaye, Jai, J, even Joe. The latter has turned up on several birthday cakes and class rosters over the years thanks to people misreading the “a” as an “o”. Also, when I introduce myself, people tend to try to process my name as something more familiar to them, generally Jane or Jade.

Thanks so much, Jae!