How popular is the baby name James in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name James.

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Popularity of the Baby Name James


Posts that Mention the Name James

Popular Baby Names in Ireland, 2020

According to data from Ireland’s Central Statistics Office (CSO), the most popular baby names in the country in 2020 were Grace and Jack.

Here are Ireland’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2020:

Girl Names

  1. Grace, 410 baby girls
  2. Fiadh [pronounced fee-a], 366
  3. Emily, 329
  4. Sophie, 328
  5. Ava, 297
  6. Amelia, 275
  7. Ella, 265 (tie)
  8. Hannah, 265 (tie)
  9. Lucy, 261
  10. Mia, 251

Boy Names

  1. Jack, 597 baby boys
  2. James, 495
  3. Noah, 447
  4. Daniel, 359
  5. Conor, 345
  6. Finn, 331
  7. Liam, 329
  8. Fionn, 323
  9. Harry, 311
  10. Charlie, 305

In the girls’ top 10, Lucy replaced Ellie.

In the boys’ top 10, Finn, Fionn and Harry replaced Adam, Luke and Tadhg.

The fastest-rising names in the top 100 in terms of numbers of babies were:

  • Éabha (+56 baby girls), Bonnie (+46), Fiadh (+32), Ada (+31), Croía (+24)
  • Finn (+75 baby boys), Benjamin (+33), Fionn (+32), Rían (+23), Tommy (+23)

Notably, Éabha was the fastest-rising name in 2019 as well.

And the fastest-rising in terms of rank were:

  • Croía (+67 spots), Cora (+37), Nina (+36), Elsie (+35), Bonnie/Penny (tied at +31)
  • Rian (+33 spots), Eoghan (+29), Benjamin (+25), Shane (+24), Sonny (+22)

The modern name Croía is based on the Irish word croí, meaning “heart,” “core,” “sweetheart.” The recent trendiness can be attributed to Irish MMA fighter Conor McGregor, who welcomed a baby girl named Croía in January of 2019.

Sources: Irish Babies’ Names 2020 – Babies’ Names 2020 Tables, Press Statement Irish Babies’ Names 2020, Croía – Behind the Name, Croí – Wiktionary

Name Quotes 94: Guy, Penn, Lynn

Happy Monday, everyone! Here’s the latest batch of name quotes…

From a 2016 article recounting the time the BBC mistook one guy named Guy for another guy named Guy:

It’s now more than a decade since Congolese job hopeful Guy Goma found himself offering his not-so-expert analysis of a legal dispute between Apple Computer (now Apple Inc.) and Apple Corp, The Beatles’ record label, over trademark rights.

Goma, after arriving at the BBC’s West London headquarters for an interview for a job in the IT department on May 8, 2006, was mistaken for a studio guest, British technology journalist Guy Kewney, and ushered all the way into a live BBC News 24 studio.

This was Guy Goma’s unplanned TV appearance:

[The mix-up happened just a couple of months after I started this name blog, incidentally.]

From a 1979 People article about the “eerie similarities” between two Ohio men who discovered, at age 39, that they were twins separated at birth:

Curiously, both had been christened James by their adoptive parents [who lived 40 miles apart]. As schoolboys, both enjoyed math and carpentry — but hated spelling. Both pursued similar adult occupations: Lewis is a security guard at a steel mill, and Springer was a deputy sheriff (though he is now a clerk for a power company). Both married women named Linda, only to divorce and remarry — each a woman named Betty. Both have sons: James Alan Lewis and James Allan Springer.

Penn Jillette, speaking to contestant Paul Gertner during a mid-2020 episode of Penn & Teller: Fool Us:

You gave me this pen. And you gave me the pen with a joke — a joke about my name. You said, “Here’s a pen, Penn.”

When I was in grade school, it would be, “Hey Penn, got a pencil?” “Hey Penn, how’s pencil?” I should have an index of all those pen jokes that were told to me. I’d have over fifty, maybe more than that. It was amazing.

On the name of activist/environmentalist MaVynee Betsch (1935-2005):

Even her name, pronounced “Ma-veen,” requires a politically charged translation. Christened Marvyne, Betsch added an extra e for the environment, and dropped the r in the 1980s to protest the environmental policies of the Reagan administration.

From the New York Times Magazine essay “Celebrate Your Name Day” by Linda Kinstler:

My family had chosen “Linda” in part because it sounded incontrovertibly American to their Soviet ears, practically an idiom of assimilation unto itself. According to a 2018 study, it is the “trendiest” name in U.S. history, having experienced a sharp rise and precipitous fall in popularity amid the postwar baby boom. By naming me Linda, my parents hoped they were conferring an easy American life upon me, a life free of mispronunciations and mistakes. For them, such a life would be forever out of reach.

[…]

Most of the Lindas I have encountered in my age group are also millennial daughters of immigrants; our name is a reminder of our parents’ aspirations and of the immense promise with which our name is laden.

On the experience of being a male Lynn, from a BBC piece about people with unfashionable names:

As a 61-year-old man, I have suffered all my life with the name Lynn. My mother simply named me after a little-known celebrity of the early 50s because she wanted a name that was not capable of being shortened. For a while I had people such as Welsh long jumper Lynn Davies to allay the perpetual claims that “it was a girl’s name”. But this led others to believe that it had to be of Welsh derivation. But there are no new male “Lynns” to correct either opinion. All this despite the fact that in the 1930s and 1940s, I believe that Lynn was more popular as a man’s name – especially in America. ~Lynn Jonathan Prescott, Birmingham

From the 2009 book Johnny Cash and the Paradox of American Identity by Leigh H. Edwards:

In [the autobiography] Cash, he explicitly addresses how he represents his identity differently in different contexts, noting how he uses different names for the different “Cashes” he played in different social settings, stating that he “operate[s] at various levels.” He stages a struggle between “Johnny Cash” the hell-rais[ing], hotel-trashing, pill-popping worldwide star and “John R. Cash,” a more subdued, adult persona.

For more name-related quotes, check out the name quotes category.

Popular Baby Names in NT, 2020

According to the government of Northern Territory, Australia, the most popular baby names in NT in 2020 were Charlotte and William.

Here are Northern Territory’s top 10 girl names and top 10+ boy names of 2020:

Girl Names

  1. Charlotte, 15 baby girls
  2. Olivia, 14
  3. Isla, 12 (tie)
  4. Matilda, 12 (tie)
  5. Amelia, 10 (5-way tie)
  6. Grace, 10 (5-way tie)
  7. Hazel, 10 (5-way tie)
  8. Mia, 10 (5-way tie)
  9. Willow, 10 (5-way tie)
  10. Violet, 9

Boy Names

  1. William, 20 baby boys
  2. Jack, 16
  3. Oliver, 15
  4. Lucas, 14
  5. Alexander, 12
  6. Henry, 11 (3-way tie)
  7. James, 11 (3-way tie)
  8. Noah, 11 (3-way tie)
  9. Hudson, 10 (3-way tie)
  10. Isaac, 10 (3-way tie)
  11. Thomas, 10 (3-way tie)

On the boys’ side, Thomas is followed by an 8-way tie involving two names I don’t usually see in the rankings: Billy and Mayson. Mayson is especially interesting because the more traditional spelling, Mason, hasn’t made the list for the last two years (after ranking as high as 2nd in 2017).

In 2019, the top two names in NT were Grace and Oliver.

Source: Popular Baby Names – NT.GOV.AU

Babies Named for Sailing Ships (F)

The people below were born aboard — and named after! — ships with F-names…

  • Falkland:
    • Falkland James Macfarlane, born in 1859
  • Famenoth:
    • Famenoth Bradley, born in 1876
  • Far East:
    • Horace Far East Guest, born in 1866
  • Fernglen:
    • James Fernglen Power, born in 1876
    • Minnie Fernglen Morrell, born in 1878
  • Feronia:
    • Ada Feronia Hutchinson, born in 1863
  • Fitzroy:
    • William Fitzroy Beck, born in 1882
  • Florence:
    • Florence Harding Campbell, born in 1884
  • Fontabelle:
    • Minnie Fontabelle Nixon, born in 1866
  • Forfarshire:
    • Mary Forfarshire Khrupp, born in 1872
    • Joseph Forfarshire Hughes, born in 1872
    • Hannah Forfarshire Hill, born in 1873
  • France:
    • France Atlantic Amsen, born in 1871
  • Furnessia:
    • Margaret Furnessia Breen, born in 1884
    • Sarah Furnessia Johnstone, born in1888

Do you think any of the ship names above work particularly well as human names?

Source: FamilySearch.org

Babies Named for Sailing Ships (E)

The SS Earl Dalhausie

The people below were born aboard — and named after! — ships with E-names…

  • Earl Dalhousie:
    • Lydia Dalhousie Woodhard, born in 1873
    • Sydney Dalhousie Smith, born in 1873
    • Ellen Dalhousie Gare, born in 1874
    • Selina Dalhousie Baker, born in 1875
    • Emily Dalhousie Hunter, born in 1875
    • Francis Louisa Dalhousie Reed, born in 1878
    • Percy Dalhousie Wiltshire, born in 1878
    • Matilda Dalhousie Cormie, born in 1879
  • Earl Derby:
    • William Earl Derby Rimmington, born in 1879
  • Earl Granville:
    • Granville Campbell Speed, born in 1879
    • William John Granville Cathrope, born in 1880
    • Granville Williams, born in 1881
    • John Granville Tymms, born in 1883
    • John Granville Richards, born in 1883
    • John Granville Flint, born in 1883
  • Earl of Zetland:
    • Helen Zetland Clark, born in 1875
    • John Whiting Zetland Hamilton, born in 1875
  • Earl Percy:
    • Florence Percy Jarrold, born in 1876
  • Edinburgh:
    • Elizabeth Edinburgh Cockayne, born in 1875
    • Edith Edinburgh Marriott, born in 1875
  • Edward Oliver:
    • Edward Neptune White, born in 1858
  • Elderslie:
    • Josephine Elderslie McGrath, born in 1887
  • Ellen Stuart:
    • John Calvert Stuart Defries, born in 1870
  • Elliot:
    • James Lyle Elliot Mackay, born in 1879
  • Ellora:
    • Mary Ellora McEwan, born in 1879
    • Ellora Mary Little, born in 1883
  • Elysia:
    • Catello Elisio Martingano, born in 1886
  • Erin:
    • Erine Andersen, born in 1881
  • Essex:
    • John Essex McQueen, born in 1863
    • Charlotte Essex Mead, born in 1863
    • Henry Essex Hamilton, born in 1863
    • Helen Essex Percy, born in 1863
    • Sarah Essex Mulholland, born in 1869
    • Wilhelmina Essex, born in 1870
    • Alfred Essex Jackson, born in 1874
  • Ethiopia:
    • Ethiopia M. Prokop, born in 1880
    • Ethiopia Murray Drabeck, born in 1883
  • Etna:
    • Margaret Etna Hugg, born in 1865
  • Euterpe:
    • Minnie McGahey Euterpe Pearson, born in 1874
    • Selina Euterpe Robinson, born in 1874

Do you think any of the ship names above work particularly well as human names?

Source: FamilySearch.org