How popular is the baby name Jared in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Jared and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Jared.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Jared

Number of Babies Named Jared

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Jared

Most Common Names of D.C. Voters, by Party

capitol building DC

A couple of weeks ago, reader Becca sent me a link to a Washington Post graphic showing the 10 most common names of registered voters within each of Washington D.C.’s four main political parties — Statehood Green, Democratic, Republican and Libertarian.

Here’s the info from the graphic:

Statehood Green Democratic Republican Libertarian
1. Jon
2. Jesse
3. Barry
4. Darnell
5. Ian
6. Juan
7. Jordan
8. Jerry
9. Corey
10. Tyrone
1. Lillie
2. Laverne
3. Ella
4. Bernice
5. Mildred
6. Peggy
7. Betty
8. Ethel
9. Toni
10. Geraldine
1. Tyler
2. Bradley
3. Kelsey
4. Lindsey
5. Kristina
6. Meredith
7. Caroline
8. Kyle
9. Kelly
10. Taylor
1. Jared
2. Jon
3. Brendan
4. Derek
5. Joy
6. Kyle
7. Brooke
8. Julian
9. Nicholas
10. Chelsea

The graphic didn’t mention the disparity between the sizes of these groups, though, so let’s throw that in too. The lists were based on data from mid-June, 2015, so here are the D.C. voter registration statistics from June 30th:

  • Statehood Green: 3,820 registered voters (0.82% of all registered voters in D.C.)
  • Democrats: 350,684 (75.58%)
  • Republicans: 28,560 (6.16%)
  • Libertarians: 779 (0.17%)

The Democrats outnumber the Libertarians by more than 450 to 1, in other words.

Here are the lists individually. After each name is the gender it’s most closely associated with and the year of peak usage as a baby name (in terms of percentage of births) since 1900.

Statehood Green (0.82% of registered voters):

  1. Jon, male, peak usage in 1968
  2. Jesse, male, 1981
  3. Barry, male, 1962
  4. Darnell, male, 1984
  5. Ian, male, 2003
  6. Juan, male, 1999
  7. Jordan, male, 1997
  8. Jerry, male, 1941
  9. Corey, male, 1977
  10. Tyrone, male, 1970

The top Statehood Green names are 100% male, and most saw peak usage during the last four decades of the 20th century.

Democrat (75.58% of registered voters):

  1. Lillie, female, peak usage in 1900
  2. Laverne, female, 1928
  3. Ella, female, 2012
  4. Bernice, female, 1921
  5. Mildred, female, 1920
  6. Peggy, female, 1937
  7. Betty, female, 1934
  8. Ethel, female, 1900
  9. Toni, female, 1968
  10. Geraldine, female, 1931

The top Democrat names are 100% female, and most saw peak usage in the first half of the 20th century, especially the ’20s and ’30s.

Republican (6.16% of registered voters):

  1. Tyler, male, peak usage in 1994
  2. Bradley, male, 1979
  3. Kelsey, female, 1992
  4. Lindsey, female, 1984
  5. Kristina, female, 1985
  6. Meredith, female, 1981
  7. Caroline, female, 2014
  8. Kyle, male, 1990
  9. Kelly, female, 1977
  10. Taylor, female, 1996

The top Republican names are 70% female and 30% male, and most saw peak usage during the last three decades of the 20th century, especially the ’90s.

Libertarian (0.17% of registered voters):

  1. Jared, male, peak usage in 1998
  2. Jon, male, 1968
  3. Brendan, male, 1999
  4. Derek, male, 1982
  5. Joy, female, 1974
  6. Kyle, male, 1990
  7. Brooke, female, 2003
  8. Julian, male, 2014
  9. Nicholas, male, 1999
  10. Chelsea, female, 1992

The top Libertarian names are 70% male and 30% female, and most saw peak usage during the last few decades of the 20th century, especially the ’90s.


It was interesting to see just how feminine and old-fashioned the top Democrat names are. But the thing that most surprised was that the Green party’s list included zero female names. I would have guessed that, if any list here was going to be 100% male, it’d be the Libertarian party — definitely not the Green party.

What are your thoughts on these lists?

Sources: Identity Politics, Washington Post, December 2015; Voter Registration Statistics – DC Board of Elections; Popular Baby Names – SSA
Image: NPS

P.S. Thank you, Becca!

Edmonton’s First Baby of 2015: Echo Frejya Grey

Echo Frejya Grey Adams
© Ian Kucerak/Edmonton Sun/QMI Agency
I haven’t seen many New Year’s baby announcements yet (fewer hospitals are participating in the tradition these days) but one of the announcements I have seen featured a rather distinctive name: Echo Frejya Grey.

Echo Frejya Grey Adams was the first baby of 2015 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. She was born to Kayla McEvoy and Jared Adams at 12:02 am on New Year’s Day.

Where did her three given names come from?

  • Echo came from the character Echo of the short-lived sci-fi TV series Dollhouse, created by Joss Whedon. “The couple agreed on the name Echo before she was even conceived, admiring the TV character’s strong personality and “take no prisoners” attitude.”
  • Frejya commemorates Iceland, which is where Kayla and Jared got married.
  • Grey came from the character Jean Grey of the X-Men comic series.

Frejya has never been on the SSA’s list, but Echo and Grey have.

Which of these three names do you like best?

Sources: Edmonton’s 2015 New Year’s baby named for Dollhouse character Echo

Texas Quints – Will, David, Marcie, Seth, Grace

On August 9, Gavin and Carrie Jones of Duncanville, Texas, welcomed a set of quints — three boys and two girls:

  • Will Edward
  • David Stephen
  • Marcie Jane
  • Seth Jared
  • Grace Elise

Let’s play a game. You’re given a chance to change one of the above names (first + middle combo). Which one do you change, and what do you replace it with?

Name Quotes for the Weekend #4

From a Grand Forks Herald article about local baby names:

Six-month-old Camber Shaw Foss, daughter of Jared and Christine Foss of Greenbush, Minn., is named for the brand of front spindle adjustment on the go-cart and the chassis on the car her father has been racing for years.

I couldn’t track down the brand, but I did find this: Camber angles.

From William D. Lindsey of the blog Bilgrimage:

There’s also the pattern–which makes family history easier at times, since it helps identify the hidden surnames of mothers–of giving the mother’s surname as a given name to a son, something my mother did in naming my middle brother Simpson. […] This pattern can result in unfortunate combinations, however, and for that reason ought sometimes to be considered carefully. In the Braselton side of my family, there’s a Head family that ties in by marriage in the 1700s back in Maryland, which united in marriage to a Bigger family, and chose to name a son Bigger Head–a choice I would not have made myself, I reckon.

From an article about bizarre baby names in West Auckland, New Zealand:

Plunket‘s most unusual West Auckland names include Problemo, Unique, Famous, Season, Stylez, Poison, Storm, Lovely, Hurricayn, Zepha and Potato.

Problemo and Potato! Both new to me.

From a Times of India article about baby names:

More and more young parents now want a name that is unique for their child. The common names like Gaurav, Amit, Rahul, Rohit, Mohit, Aditya, Aakanksha, Neha, Aditi, Preeti and Pooja have given way to trendy names like Alisah, Prioska, Aliyah, Natalia, Rachel, Nysa, Adam, Diva, Renae, Alina, Sarah and like.

UPDATE – Just tweeted by much-loved advice columnist Sugar:

It’s Raymond Carver’s birthday today. He’d be 74 if he were still alive. He was so important to me. My son, Carver, is named for him.

“Sugar” is the nom de plume of author Cheryl Strayed.

Here are quote lists #1, #2, and #3.

Babies Named for Jareth, the Goblin King

jarethRemember Jim Henson’s fantasy film Labyrinth (1986)?

The film’s villain, Jareth the Goblin King, was played by none other than David Bowie (wearing some sort of stringy/spikey mullet wig).

The teenage protagonist Sarah, played by Jennifer Connelly, has to navigate Jareth’s massive labyrinth in order to rescue her baby brother Toby from the goblins.

The movie was released in mid-1986. And, not surprisingly, 1986 is the first year we see the name Jareth on the SSA’s official baby name list:

  • 1990: 49 baby boys named Jareth
  • 1989: 38 baby boys named Jareth
  • 1988: 51 baby boys named Jareth
  • 1987: 50 baby boys named Jareth
  • 1986: 10 baby boys named Jareth [debut]
  • 1985: unlisted

Usage was lower in the 1990s, but picked back up again in the 2000s:

  • 2014: 73 baby boys named Jareth
  • 2013: 53 baby boys named Jareth
  • 2012: 55 baby boys named Jareth
  • 2011: 52 baby boys named Jareth
  • 2010: 51 baby boys named Jareth
  • 2009: 75 baby boys named Jareth
  • 2008: 84 baby boys (and 5 baby girls) named Jareth
  • 2007: 76 baby boys (and 8 baby girls) named Jareth
  • 2006: 74 baby boys named Jareth

I don’t know how writer Terry Jones (of Monty Python fame) came up with the name Jareth, but it looks/sounds to me like a cross between Jared and Gareth.

How to Find a Boy Name that Won’t Become a Girl Name

Are there any boy names out there that aren’t at risk of becoming girl names?

This may not be the answer you want to hear, but: nope. There’s simply no way to guarantee that a boy name won’t suddenly become trendy for girls. (A movie mermaid was all it took for the name Madison — a name with the word “son” right in there — to become a girl name.)

No boy names are girl-proof, but some are certainly girl-resistant. Which ones? Here are five types I’ve come up with:

1. Boy names with unstylish elements, such as “bert” and “stan.” If a boy name isn’t fashionable enough to be popular for boys, it shouldn’t be too tempting to use for girls either.


2. Boy names with few vowels. They tend to sound more masculine than other names.


3. Boy names with length. Most of today’s popular unisex names stop at two syllables.


4. Boy names with hard endings, such as D, K and T. Many of the boy names being used by girls end with softer consonants like L, N and R.


5. Boy names with well-known feminine forms. If there’s a readily available girl-version, doesn’t it seem silly to use the masculine form for a female?

Brian (Brianna)
Carl (Carla)
Erik (Erika)
Gerald (Geraldine)
George (Georgia)
Henry (Henrietta)
Joseph (Josephine)
Martin (Martina)
Paul (Paula)
Robert (Roberta)
Theodore (Theodora)
Victor (Victoria)

As I mentioned, there’s never a guarantee. (A female Scrubs character is named Elliot — will that be the next to go? How about Blake, thanks to Blake Lively?) But I think boy names that fit into the above categories are relatively safe bets.

Are there any other types of names you’d add to the list?

Baby Name Needed – Middle Name for Chase

A reader named Rose Ann is expecting a baby boy. She knows his first name will be Chase, but needs some help coming up with a middle. She’s especially interested in suggestions that start with J.

Personally, I’d avoid J-names that have either a long A-sound or an S-sound. I think either of those sounds would make the middle name too much like the first name. (I’m not too keen on combinations like Chase Jason and Chase James.) I’d also look for something with at least 2 syllables.

Here are some ideas:


Jacob breaks the rules, but the hard-C and B make it very distinct from Chase, so that’s why I included it.

Speaking of hard sounds…if I were to look for names other than J-names, that’s probably what I’d focus on:


Two more options I’d throw out there are Benjamin and Elijah. They don’t start with J, but they do have J’s…and these J’s have a bit more breathing room (being farther away from the Ch- of Chase). One of these might be a good compromise if Rose Ann can’t find a J-name she likes.

What other middle names would you suggest?