How popular is the baby name Jeremy in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Jeremy and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Jeremy.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Jeremy

Number of Babies Named Jeremy

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Jeremy

The Top Baby Names in Maryland in 2011?

Maryland’s Open Data website includes a single table of Maryland baby name rankings (2011) broken down by race/ethnic group. This is cool because New York City does the exact same breakdown, and we happen to have the equivalent NYC baby name rankings (2011). So we ought to be able to compare and contrast the two sets of rankings, right?

Yeah, that’s what I thought…until I started looking more closely at Maryland’s data.

According to the SSA, these were the top 10 boy names in Maryland in 2011:

  1. Mason
  2. Jacob
  3. Michael
  4. Ethan
  5. Ryan
  6. William
  7. Alexander
  8. Noah
  9. Daniel
  10. Aiden (tied for 10th)
  11. Jayden (tied for 10th)

But according to the state of Maryland, the top 10 boy names were quite different:

Rank OVERALL Asian &
Pacific Isl.
Black Hispanic White
1 Aiden Aiden Jaiden Christopher Lucas
2 Christopher Lucas Aiden Anthony Mason
3 Jayden Alexander Christopher John Jackson
4 Mason Muhammed Cameron Alexander Jacob
5 Lucas Ethan Elijah Daniel John
6 Jacob Nathan Jeremy Matthew Aiden
7 Alexander John Michael Brian Alexander
8 Nathan Andrew Isaiah Justin Liam
9 Michael Justin Mason Jaiden William
10 Ethan Jacob Caleb Kevin Ryan

It isn’t totally implausible that Aiden and Jayden might have ranked 1st and 3rd in 2011, but Christopher in 2nd? Maybe if this were a dataset from thirty years ago, but not five years ago. The SSA indicates that Christopher ranked closer to 18th in the state that year.

And what’s with the two different spellings of Jayden/Jaiden?

Plus there are some sizable raw number discrepancies, such as:

  • Aiden: 588 babies (MD data) vs. 281 babies (SSA data for MD)
  • Christopher: 584 babies (MD data) vs. 256 babies (SSA data for MD)
  • Jayden: 498 babies (MD data) vs. 281 babies (SSA data for MD)
  • Mason: 463 babies (MD data) vs. 432 babies (SSA data for MD)

And now the girl names. According to the SSA, these were the top 10 girl names in Maryland in 2011:

  1. Sophia
  2. Olivia
  3. Isabella
  4. Madison
  5. Ava
  6. Emma
  7. Abigail
  8. Chloe
  9. Emily
  10. Elizabeth

According to the state of Maryland, though, the top 10 girl names in the state were these:

Rank OVERALL Asian &
Pacific Isl.
Black Hispanic White
1 Sophia Sophia Chloe Sophia Sophia
2 Isabel Chloe London Emily Isabel
3 Chloe Isabel Layla Allison Abigail
4 Ava Caitlin/Kate Madison Isabel Olivia
5 Madison Hannah Kennedy Ashley Ava
6 Olivia Olivia Aaliyah Angelina Riley
7 Emily Sara(h) McKenzie Natalie Madison
8 McKenzie Abigail Zoe(y) Genesis Emily
9 Abigail Emily Payton Gabrielle McKenzie
10 Riley Lillian/Lily Taylor Kimberly Chloe

Not only does Isabel magically replace Isabella in the Maryland data, but McKenzie and Riley rank 8th and 10th — even though the SSA says they should be closer to 77th (!) and 28th.

Not to mention the raw number discrepancies, such as:

  • Sophia: 503 babies (MD data) vs. 367 babies (SSA data for MD)
  • McKenzie: 325 babies (MD data) vs. 71 babies (SSA data for MD)
  • Riley: 298 babies (MD data) vs. 118 babies (SSA data for MD)

Intriguing parallels between the MD data and the NYC data do exist. In both locations, Elijah and Isaiah were in the top 10 for African-American boys only, and London, Aaliyah, and Taylor were in the top 10 for African-American girls only.

But if we can’t trust the data, we can’t draw any meaningful conclusions.

Labels like “Caitlin/Kate,” “Sara(h),” “Zoe(y)” and “Lillian/Lily” suggest that variant names were combined here and there. I suspect this is also what happened with Isabel/Isabella, Sophia/Sofia, Aiden, Jayden, MacKenzie, Riley, and maybe even Christopher (perhaps Maryland merged all the “Chris-” names). What are your thoughts on this?

Popular Boy Names: Biblical vs. Non-Biblical

How has the ratio of Biblical names to non-Biblical names changed over time (if at all) among the most popular baby names in the U.S.?

This question popped into my head recently, so I thought I’d take a look at the data. We’ll do boy names today and girl names tomorrow.

First, let’s set some parameters. For these posts, “Biblical” names are personal names (belonging to either humans or archangels) mentioned in the Bible, plus all derivatives of these names, plus any other name with a specifically Biblical origin (e.g., Jordan, Sharon, Genesis). The “most popular” names are the top 20, and “over time” is the span of a century.

For boy names, the ratio of Biblical names to non-Biblical names has basically flipped over the last 100 years. Here’s a visual — Biblical names are in the yellow cells, non-Biblical names are in the green cells, and a borderline name (which I counted as non-Biblical) is in the orange cell:

Popular boy names: Biblical vs. non-Biblical, from Nancy's Baby Names.
Popular boy names over time: Biblical (yellow) vs. non-Biblical. Click to enlarge.
  • Biblical names: Adam, Alexander, Andrew, Austin (via Augustus), Benjamin, Daniel, David, Elijah, Ethan, Jack (via John), Jackson (via John), Jacob, James, Jason, John, Jonathan, Joseph, Joshua, Justin (via Justus), Lucas, Mark, Matthew, Michael, Nathan, Nicholas, Noah, Paul, Stephen, Steven, Thomas, Timothy, Zachary
  • Non-Biblical names: Aiden, Albert, Anthony, Arthur, Billy, Brandon, Brian, Charles, Christopher, Dennis, Donald, Dylan, Edward, Eric, Frank, Gary, George, Harold, Harry, Henry, Jayden, Jeffrey, Kenneth, Kevin, Larry, Liam, Logan, Louis, Mason, Raymond, Richard, Robert, Ronald, Ryan, Scott, Tyler, Walter, William
  • Borderline name: Jerry (can be based on the Biblical name Jeremy/Jeremiah or on the non-Biblical names Jerome, Gerald, Gerard)
    • It felt strange putting an overtly Christian name like Christopher in the non-Biblical category, but it doesn’t appear anywhere in the Bible, so…that’s where it goes.

      Here are the year-by-year tallies:

      Year Top 20 names
      given to…
      # Biblical # Non-Biblical
      1914 40% of baby boys 5 (25%) 15 (75%)
      1924 43% of baby boys 6 (30%) 14 (70%)
      1934 43% of baby boys 7 (35%) 13 (65%)
      1944 47% of baby boys 7 (35%) 13 (65%)
      1954 46% of baby boys 11 (55%) 9 (45%)
      1964 42% of baby boys 11 (55%) 9 (45%)
      1974 38% of baby boys 11 (55%) 9 (45%)
      1984 36% of baby boys 14 (70%) 6 (30%)
      1994 27% of baby boys 14 (70%) 6 (30%)
      2004 19% of baby boys 14 (70%) 6 (30%)
      2014 14% of baby boys 14 (70%) 6 (30%)

      But there’s a huge difference between sample sizes of 40% and 14%, so let’s also take a look at the 2014 top 100, which covers 42% of male births.

      By my count, last year’s top 100 boy names were half Biblical, half non-Biblical:

      Biblical names (49) Non-Biblical names (51)
      Noah, Jacob, Ethan, Michael, Alexander, James, Daniel, Elijah, Benjamin, Matthew, Jackson (via John), David, Lucas, Joseph, Andrew, Samuel, Gabriel, Joshua, John, Luke, Isaac, Caleb, Nathan, Jack (via John), Jonathan, Levi, Jaxon (via John), Julian (via Julius), Isaiah, Eli, Aaron, Thomas, Jordan, Jeremiah, Nicholas, Evan, Josiah, Austin (via Augustus), Jace (via Jason), Jason, Jose, Ian, Adam, Zachary, Jaxson (via John), Asher, Nathaniel, Justin (via Justus), Juan Liam, Mason, William, Logan, Aiden, Jayden, Anthony, Carter, Dylan, Christopher, Oliver, Henry, Sebastian, Owen, Ryan, Wyatt, Hunter, Christian, Landon, Charles, Connor, Cameron, Adrian, Gavin, Robert, Brayden, Grayson, Colton, Angel, Dominic, Kevin, Brandon, Tyler, Parker, Ayden, Chase, Hudson, Nolan, Easton, Blake, Cooper, Lincoln, Xavier, Bentley, Kayden, Carson, Brody, Ryder, Leo, Luis, Camden

      (Christian, Angel, Xavier, Dominic…all technically non-Biblical, despite having strong ties to Christianity.)

      50%-50% isn’t quite as extreme as 70%-30%, but it’s still noticeably more Biblical than 1914’s 25%-75%.

      Do any of these results surprise you?

Baby Names Needed for Quintuplets

A reader named Allison and her husband Dawson are expecting 5 (!) little ones. Three will be boys, two will be girls, and their surname will sound a lot like “Barber.” Here’s more from Allison:

We have twins Holden Patrick (Holden is from Catcher In the Rye and Patrick is my father’s middle name) and Theo Drummey (Theo because we liked it and Drummey is a family name.) I’m Irish and my husband is Canadian but doesn’t really have a name preference (other then if he had his wish our first daughter would be Jasmine Atlanta). As you can see I like to have my heritage in the names but I know from my family that names spelled in Gaelic form don’t usually go over well with the western way we pronounce things. At the same time I really like simple classy names and names with meaning… We have a large mix of name choices the only thing we knew is we don’t want any Winifreds or Paulinas or Alfreds or Richards, we also would like to stay away from Liam, Aidan, Maeve, Finn, Brigid all family names that have been taken. We are stuck! Here is our list of names so far, completely mixed up…

Tadgh- pronounced Tighe
Cian- pro. Keean
Callum- pro. Kaylum

Caoimhe- pro. Keevah
Thea (I know we can’t use this because of Theo but I love it!)

Family Names: (we would use these as middle names)

Thank you! Any help is appreciated! :)

First of all, congratulations!

I think Holden and Theo have great names. Of the options listed, the five I like best with Holden and Theo are Benjamin, Christian, Maxwell, Kate and Cecilia, though I like many of the others as well.

I’d be wary about using names like Tadgh and Caoimhe because, where I am, names like these require explanation. Things will probably be tricky enough with quints…why add extra complication? :) But perhaps Allison and her family live in a place where Irish names are common and this isn’t an issue.

Here are some other ideas:


It’s hard to talk about middles before the first names are in place. I’d probably use short middles with long firsts and vice versa (e.g. Cecilia Pearl, Kate Patricia), just for balance. And I’d avoid the combo Jasmine Pearl, as that’s a type of tea. It’s delicious, but still.

Which of the above (3 boy names, 2 girl names) do you like best with Holden and Theo? What other names would you suggest to Allison?

UPDATE – Allison has just learned that there will actually be 3 girls and 2 boys!

Jem and Jerrica – Truly Outrageous Baby Names

JemAnother cartoon-inspired baby name! Actually there are two this time, as today’s character had two different identities.

Jem, which began airing in late 1985, was a cartoon about an all-girl rock band called Jem and the Holograms. Jem’s big secret? She didn’t really exist–she was just the alter ego of a character named Jerrica Benton, who used a powerful holographic computer (“Show time, Synergy!”) and a pair of hi-tech earrings to have the Jem hologram projected over her.

The Name Jem

Before the cartoon, there had been girls named Gem and boys named Jem (short for Jeremy/Jeremiah/James). But only in 1986 do baby girls named Jem start popping up on the SSA’s baby name list:

  • 1991: 5 baby girls named Jem
  • 1990: 8 baby girls named Jem
  • 1989: 6 baby girls named Jem
  • 1988: 9 baby girls named Jem
  • 1987: 11 baby girls named Jem
  • 1986: 5 baby girls named Jem [debut]
  • 1985: unlisted

In total, at least 56 baby girls have been named Jem since 1986.

The Name Jerrica

The name Jerrica was in use well before the cartoon debuted, but without Jem it might never have cracked the top 1,000:

  • 1990: 370 baby girls named Jerrica [ranked 609th]
  • 1989: 402 baby girls named Jerrica [ranked 558th]
  • 1988: 437 baby girls named Jerrica [ranked 506th]
  • 1987: 318 baby girls named Jerrica [ranked 607th]
  • 1986: 199 baby girls named Jerrica [ranked 836th]
  • 1985: 64 baby girls named Jerrica
  • 1984: 45 baby girls named Jerrica

It managed to stay in the top 1,000 all the way through 1995. Jerrica is still on the SSA’s list today, though the numbers aren’t too impressive anymore (i.e., only 27 baby girls were named Jerricas in 2009).

The names Jerica and Jerika also saw increased usage during this time, and variants of Jerrica that debuted on the SSA’s baby name list in the mid-to-late ’80s include Jarica, Gerica, Jherica, Gerrica, Jareka, Jericca, Jarika, Gerika, Jherrica, Jerryca and Jarrica.

Finally, because I know you’re just dying to hear it, here’s the Jem opening theme song [vid].

Other cartoon-inspired baby names: Aeon, Cheetara, Pebbles

Baby Name Needed – Middle Name for Chase

A reader named Rose Ann is expecting a baby boy. She knows his first name will be Chase, but needs some help coming up with a middle. She’s especially interested in suggestions that start with J.

Personally, I’d avoid J-names that have either a long A-sound or an S-sound. I think either of those sounds would make the middle name too much like the first name. (I’m not too keen on combinations like Chase Jason and Chase James.) I’d also look for something with at least 2 syllables.

Here are some ideas:


Jacob breaks the rules, but the hard-C and B make it very distinct from Chase, so that’s why I included it.

Speaking of hard sounds…if I were to look for names other than J-names, that’s probably what I’d focus on:


Two more options I’d throw out there are Benjamin and Elijah. They don’t start with J, but they do have J’s…and these J’s have a bit more breathing room (being farther away from the Ch- of Chase). One of these might be a good compromise if Rose Ann can’t find a J-name she likes.

What other middle names would you suggest?

Most Popular Baby Names in Malta in 2007

Malta seems to be having some trouble tallying baby names. According to the island’s National Statistics Office, these were the top boy names for 2007:

1. Luke/Luca
2. Matthew/Matteo/Matthias
3. Jake
4. Julian
5. John/Gianni/Jean/Juan/Sean
6. Nicholas/Nikolai & Aiden
7. Kieran
8. Isaac
9. Andrew/André/Andrea & Zack
10. Nathan/Nathaniel
11. Jeremy/Jerome & James/Jamie & Jayden
12. Daniel & Gabriel & Miguel
13. Liam
14. Alexander/Alessandro/Alejandro & Neil
15. Michael/Mikiel/Mikail/Michele & Carl/Carlo/Karl & Kyle
16. Benjamin & Thomas/Tommaso
17. Christian/Kristian
18. Mark/Marc/Marco
19. Dejan & Denzel
20. Kayden
98 babies
37 (tie)
33 (tie)
31 (tie)
29 (tie)
26 (tie)
24 (tie)
20 (tie)
16 (tie)

There’s nothing wrong with the list itself. But problems begin when you try to compare this list with the 2006 list.

For instance, in 2006, 49 boys were named Michael or Michele. A year later, there’s no way to tell if either of these names has became more or less popular — all we know is that 24 boys were named Michael, Michele Mikiel or Mikail, and that 29 boys were named Miguel specifically.

And that’s just the beginning. Between 2006 and 2007, Nicholas became Nicholas/Nikolai, Thomas became Thomas/Tommaso, and James became James/Jamie. Alexander became Alexander/Alessandro/Alejandro, while (accent-less) Andre became Andrew/André/Andrea. All of these odd groupings make it impossible to draw conclusions about how the popularity level of a specific name has changed over time.

I am also suspicious about spelling. Aidan (#6) and Jaydon (#19) from the 2006 list seemed to morph into Aiden (#6) and Jayden (#11) in 2007.

Finally — and this may be nit-picky — I dislike how Jeremy and Jerome were lumped together. The names may look alike, but they are unrelated.

I have issues with the girl names as well:

1. Maria/Mariah
2. Martina
3. Julia/Giulia
4. Christina/Kristina/Christine/Christa
5. Elisa/Eliza/Elizabeth
6. Sarah
7. Emma & Maya
8. Nicole/Nicola/Nicolette
9. Amy & Jasmine/Yasmine
10. Michela/Michelle
11. Katrina/Katie & Shania
12. Aaliyah & Hayley & Jade
13. Alexandra/Alessandra/Alessia
14. Francesca/Ylenia
15. Kylie
16. Kaya
17. Emily & Kayleigh
18. Kelsey & Leah & Rihanna & Thea
19. Ella & Elena & Kiera & Kyra
20. Hannah
73 babies
34 (tie)
30 (tie)
27 (tie)
19 (tie)
16 (tie)
15 (tie)
14 (tie)

Between 2006 and 2007, Julia became Julia/Giula, Nicole became Nicole/Nicola/Nicolette, Jasmin (sans e) became Jasmine/Yasmine, and Elisa/Eliza became Elisa/Eliza/Elisabeth. Michela went from being grouped with Michaela to being grouped with Michelle.

And, as with the boys, I don’t think spelling stayed consistent. Hailey (#10, 2006) became Hayley (#12, 2007) and Kaylie (#17, 2006) became Kayleigh (#17, 2007).

Malta, you’re driving me crazy! I hope the top names of 2008 are listed more logically (i.e., using name-groupings that have been used before). I’m keeping my eye on you… :)