How popular is the baby name Jocelyn in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Jocelyn.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Jocelyn


Posts that Mention the Name Jocelyn

Name Quotes 86: Sena, Fennis, LeBron

Time for the monthly quote-post!

From the speech “How Everything Turns Away” by children’s book author Lois Lowry (b. 1937):

My first photograph…or the first photograph of me…was taken, by my father, when I was 36 hours old. My name was different then. They had named me Sena, for my Norwegian grandmother, and that was my name until she was notified; then she sent a telegram insisting that they give me an American name, and so I was renamed Lois Ann for my father’s two sisters.

From an article about baby-naming in Armenia:

Armenia does not have a censorship for names, while its neighbor Azerbaijan has. There are three categories of names in Azerbaijan: “allowed,” “undesirable,” and “prohibited.” No comment is necessary for the first group. The second group includes funny and bizarre names. The third group refers to Armenian names.

On the names of spirit guides, from the book Journey of Souls (1994) by LBL hypnotherapist Dr. Michael Newton:

The personal names my clients attach to their guides range from ordinary, whimsical, or quaint-sounding words, to the bizarre. Frequently, these names can be traced back to a specific past life a teacher spent with a student. Some clients are unable to verbalize their guide’s name because the sound cannot be duplicated, even when they see them clearly while under hypnosis. I tell these people it is much more important that they understand the purpose of why certain guides are assigned to them, rather than possessing their names. A subject may simply use a general designation for their guide such as: director, advisor, instructor, or just “my friend.”

From a 1987 Sports Illustrated interview with basketball player Fennis Dembo:

With apologies to World B. Free, Shaquille O’Neal and, yes, even God Shammgod, when it comes to staking a claim to basketball’s alltime name, Fennis Dembo enjoys Jordanlike distance from the pretenders. “I’m always a bit stunned that people still remember me,” says Fennis, whose mother, Clarissa, selected his name, along with that of his twin sister, Fenise, as a declaration that after 11 children, her childbearing days were finis. “I tried to set up an E-mail account, but two other guys–basketball fans, I guess–were already using my name in their address.”

From a 2018 interview with basketball player LeBron James [vid]:

I still regret giving my 14-year-old my name […] When I was younger, obviously, I didn’t have a dad. So, my whole thing was, like, whenever I have a kid, not only is he gonna be a junior, but I’m gonna do everything that this man didn’t do. They’re gonna experience things that I didn’t experience, and the only thing I can do is give them the blueprint, and it’s up to them to take their own course.

(LeBron, Jr., is nicknamed “Bronny” — no doubt to differentiate son from father, but perhaps also to take some of the pressure off. Here’s a post about how LeBron James has affected baby names over the years.)

From a 2016 Maxim interview with movie director Ron Howard:

Q: Is it true that your kids’ middle names come from the locations where they were conceived?

A: David Letterman got that out of me, and my kids will never let me forget it. My daughter, Bryce [Dallas Howard], was conceived in Dallas, and our twins [Jocelyn Carlyle Howard and Paige Carlyle Howard] were conceived while we were doing a publicity tour at the Carlyle Hotel in New York City. For the last one [Reed Cross Howard], we were on Lower Cross Road, so we decided to go with Cross. “Volvo” wouldn’t be such a good middle name.

From a review of the memoir The Kennedy Chronicles by former MTV veejay Kennedy (full name: Lisa Kennedy Montgomery):

According to Kennedy, her secret dalliance with the then-married lead singer and frontman of the Goo Goo Dolls led to one of the group’s most well-known songs, the 1995 mega-hit “Name.” To Kennedy, the lyrics hit a little to close to home: “Did you lose yourself somewhere out there? Did you get to be a star?” And then “You could hide beside me/ Maybe for a while. And I won’t tell no one your name.”

She writes: “When I asked him about it he indeed admitted the inspiration and told me there was no way all we’d shared wasn’t going to show up in his writing.”

Here’s the song:

For more name-related quotes, check out the name quotes category.

Rare Girl Names from Early Cinema: A (part 2)

auriol

Looking for an uncommon A-name for your baby girl? Here’s half of the final installment of names from the early cinema series. The other half of the A-list will go up in a few weeks.

*

Amabel
Amabel was a character played by actress Andree Tourneur in the film The Gilded Highway (1926).

  • Usage of the baby name Amabel.

Amanata
Amanata was a character played by actress Josephine West in the short film The Curse of the Great Southwest (1913).

Amarilly
Amarilly Jenkins was a character played by actress Mary Pickford in the film Amarilly of Clothes-Line Alley (1918).

Ambrosia
Ambrosia was a character played by actress Ella Hall in the films The Love Girl (1916) and The Charmer (1917).

Ameia
Ameia was a character played by actress Viola Dana in the film God’s Law and Man’s (1917).

  • Usage of the baby name Ameia.

Amenset
Amenset was a character played by actress Edith Storey in the film The Dust of Egypt (1915).

Amo
Amo Ingraham was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1940s. She was born in New York in 1909.

  • Usage of the baby name Amo.

Amphirosa
Amphirosa was a character played by actress Helen Lindroth in the film The Swan (1925).

Amrah
Amrah was a character played by actress Dale Fuller in the film Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ (1925).

  • Usage of the baby name Amrah.

Amzie
Amzie Strickland was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to 2000s. She was born in 1919 in Oklahoma.

  • Usage of the baby name Amzie.

Anaioe
Anaioe was a character played by actress Mary Fuller in the short film A Daughter of the Nile (1915).

Anastasie
Anastasie Goriot was a character played by actress Jocelyn Lee in the film Paris at Midnight (1926).

Anbella
Anbella was a character played by actress Maria Montez in the film The Exile (1947).

Ancaria
Ancaria was a character played by actress Joyzelle Joyner in the film The Sign of the Cross (1932).

Andra
Andra West was a character played by actress Heather Angel in the film Cry ‘Havoc’ (1943).

  • Usage of the baby name Andra.

Andree
Andree was a character name in multiple films, including The Eternal Struggle (1923) and Human Desires (1924).

  • Usage of the baby name Andree.

Anemone
Anemone Breckenridge was a character played by actress Mary Pickford in the film The Eagle’s Mate (1914).

Aneth
Aneth Consinor was a character played by actress Vivian Reed in the film The Last Egyptian (1914).

  • Usage of the baby name Aneth.

Angella
Angella was a character played by actress Marian Swayne in the short film The Heavenly Widow (1913).

Angharad
Angharad was a character played by actress Maureen O’Hara in the film How Green Was My Valley (1941).

  • Usage of the baby name Angharad (which debuted in the data in 1943).

Angine
Angine Sprunt was a character played by actress Charlotte Merriam in the film The Nth Commandment (1923).

Angy
Angy was a character name in multiple films, including The Famous Mrs. Fair (1923) and Here Comes the Groom (1934).

  • Usage of the baby name Angy.

Anice
Anice was a character name in multiple films, including The Wrong Man (1917) and The Railroader (1919).

  • Usage of the baby name Anice.

Anielka
Anielka Elter was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1930s. She was born in 1901.

Anitah
Anitah was a character played by actress Zena Keefe in the film Out of the Snows (1920).

Anitia
Anitia was a character played by actress Annette Kellerman in the film A Daughter of the Gods (1916).

  • Usage of the baby name Anitia.

Anitra
Anitra was a character name in multiple films, including Runaway, Romany (1917) and The Amazing Woman (1920).

  • Usage of the baby name Anitra.

Aniuta
Aniuta was a character played by actress Bernice Claire in the film Song of the Flame (1930).

Annana
Annana was a character played by actress Movita in the film Captain Calamity (1936).

Annetta
Annetta von Tollen was a character played by actress Beverly Bayne in the short film The Ambition of the Baron (1915).

Anni
Anni Pavlovitch was a character played by actress Joan Crawford in the film The Bride Wore Red (1937).

  • Usage of the baby name Anni.

Annice
Annice Van Dorn was a character played by actress Grace Darmond in the film Where the Worst Begins (1925).

  • Usage of the baby name Annice.

Annis
Annis Grand was a character played by actress Kathleen Kirkham in the film The Foolish Matrons (1921).

  • Usage of the baby name Annis.

Annushka
Annushka was a character played by actress Amy Veness in the film Black Roses (1936).

Anola
Anola was a character played by actress Caroline Frances Cooke in the short film Metamorphosis (1914).

  • Usage of the baby name Anola.

Anthea
Anthea Dane was a character played by actress Elissa Landi in the film The Price of Things (1930).

  • Usage of the baby name Anthea.

Antinea
Antinea was a character name in multiple films, including Missing Husbands (1921) and Siren of Atlantis (1949).

Antiope
Antiope was a character played by actress Elissa Landi in the film The Warrior’s Husband (1933).

Antonita
Antonita was a character played by actress Merle Oberon in the film The Private Life of Don Juan (1934).

Anyana
Anyana was a character played by actress Movita in the film El Capitan Tormenta (1936).

Apricottia
Apricottia was a character played by actress Ethel Teare in the short film The Knaves and the Knight (1915).

Arabel
Arabel Barrett was a character played by actress Katharine Alexander in the film The Barretts of Wimpole Street (1934).

  • Usage of the baby name Arabel.

Arai
Arai was a character played by actress Movita in the film The Hurricane (1937).

  • Usage of the baby name Arai.

Araminta
Araminta was a character name in multiple films, including David Garrick (1912) and Love Birds (1934).

Arathea
Arathea Manning was a character played by actress Mae Murray in the film Big Little Person (1919).

Arbutus
Arbutus Quilty was a character played by actress Louise Fazenda in the film Listen Lester (1924).

Ardis
Ardis Delafield was a character played by Nora Lane in the film Careless Lady (1932).

  • Usage of the baby name Ardis.

Ardita
Ardita was a character name in multiple films, including The Off-Shore Pirate (1921) and The Siren of Seville (1924).

  • Usage of the baby name Ardita.

Argyl
Argyl Crawford was a character played by actress Ann Little in the film Under Handicap (1917).

  • Usage of the baby name Argyl.

Aritana
Aritana was a character played by actress Adele Mara in the film Call of the South Seas (1944).

Arla
Arla Dean was a character played by actress Dorothy Lamour in the film Moon Over Burma (1940).

  • Usage of the baby name Arla.

Arleta
Arleta Vance was a character played by actress Marie Prevost in the film Call of the Rockies (1929).

  • Usage of the baby name Arleta.

Arline
Arline Pretty was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1950s. She was born in Washington, D.C., in 1885. Arline was also a character name in multiple films, including Only Thing (1925) and Back in Circulation (1937).

  • Usage of the baby name Arline.

Arly
Arleta “Arly” Harolday was a character played by actress Ella Raines in the film Tall in the Saddle (1944).

  • Usage of the baby name Arly.

Armida
Armida Vendrell, often credited simply as Armida, was an actress who appeared in films films from the 1920s to the 1950s. She was born in Mexico in 1911.

  • Usage of the baby name Armida.

Arna
Arna was a character played by actress Rose Tapley in the short film War (1911).

  • Usage of the baby name Arna.

Arnice
Arnice was a character played by actress Ella Hall in the film Secret Love (1916).

  • Usage of the baby name Arnice.

Arrah
Arrah Meelish was a character played by actress Gene Gauntier in the film Arrah-Na-Pogue (1911).

  • Usage of the baby name Arrah.

Arria

Arria was a character played by actress Helen Wright in the film Damon and Pythias (1914).

  • Usage of the baby name Arria.

Arrita
Arrita was a character played by actress Reina Valdez in the short film Italian Love (1914).

Arte
Arte O’Neill was a character played by actress Helen Lindroth in the short film The Shaughraun (1912).

Artemisia
Artemisia Stebbins was a character played by actress Mabel Stoughton in the short film Balked at the Alter (1908).

Arvia
Arvia was a character played by actress Carmel Myers in the film The Dancer of the Nile (1923).

  • Usage of the baby name Arvia.

Arvilla
Arvilla Howe was a character played by actress Ruth Roland in the short film The Egyptian Mummy (1913).

Ashubetis
Ashubetis was a character played by actress Valda Valkyrien in the film The Image Maker (1917).

Aspasia
Aspasia Conti was a character played by actress Agnes Moorehead in the film Mrs. Parkington (1944).

Assina
Assina was a character played by actress Mrs. George O. Nichols in the short film Women of the Desert (1913).

Asta
Asta Nielsen was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in Denmark in 1881. Asta was also a character played by actress Esther Ralston in the film Rome Express (1932).

  • Usage of the baby name Asta.

Ata
Ata was a character played by actress Elena Verdugo in the film The Moon and Sixpence (1942).

  • Usage of the baby name Ata.

Atala
Atala was a character played by actress Bessie Eyton in the short film Atala (1912).

Athene
Athene Seyler was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1960s. She was born in England in 1889.

  • Usage of the baby name Athene.

Athole
Athole Shearer was an actress who appeared in films in the 1920s. She was born in Canada in 1900.

Atoline
Atoline France was a character played by actress Carol Dempster in the film The Girl Who Stayed Home (1919).

Attarea
Attarea was a character played by actress Seena Owen in the film The Fall of Babylon (1919).

Attosa
Attosa was a character played by actress Gale Sondergaard in the film Night in Paradise (1946).

Auber
Auber was a character played by actress Lana Turner in the film The Great Garrick (1937).

Audelle
Audelle Higgins was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s.

Augusta
Augusta was a character played by actress Emily Fitzroy in the film Timbuctoo (1933).

Augustina
Augustina was a character played by actress Mary Alden in the film The Beloved Brute (1924).

Aurelie
Aurelie Lindstrom was a character played by actress Bessie Love in the film The Midlanders (1920).

Auriol
Auriol Lee was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1940s. She was born in England in 1880. Auriol was also a character played by actress Anna Q. Nilsson in the film The Side Show of Life (1924).

Auriole
Auriole Praed was a character played by actress Marjorie Rambeau in the film The Greater Woman (1917).

Aurore
Princess Aurore was a character played by actress Elissa Landi in the film Crimson Dynasty (1935).

  • Usage of the baby name Aurore.

Australia
Australia was a character name in multiple films, including Lovey Mary (1926) and Children of Chance (1949).

Australy
Australy was a character played by actress May McAvoy in the film Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch (1919).

Averil
Averil Rochester was a character played by actress Benita Hume in the film A South Sea Bubble (1928).

  • Usage of the baby name Averil.

Avesa
Avesa Pomeroy was a character played by actress Elisabeth Risdon in the film The Mother of Dartmoor (1917).

Avice
Avice Bereton was a character played by actress Enid Markey in the film The Phantom (1916).

  • Usage of the baby name Avice.

Avis
Avis was a character name in multiple films, including The Roughneck (short, 1915) and Beyond (1921).

  • Usage of the baby name Avis.

Avonia
Avonia was a character played by actress Gwen Lee in the film The Actress (1928).

Avonne
Avonne Taylor was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1930s. She was born in Ohio in 1899.

  • Usage of the baby name Avonne.

Awaneta
Awaneta was a character played by actress Teddy Sampson in the short film The Boundary Line (1915).

Awretha
Awretha Pickering was an actress who appeared in 1 film in 1919.

Axelle
Axelle von Meirbach was a character played by actress Leila Hyams in the film Surrender (1931).

  • Usage of the baby name Axelle.

Azaline
Azaline was a character played by actress Emily Barrye in the film Volcano! (1926).

Azamora
Azamora was a character played by actress Lila Leslie in the short film A Clean Slate (1915).

Azella
Azella was a character played by actress Gloria Jetter in the film Dixie Jamboree (1944).

  • Usage of the baby name Azella.

Azuri
Azuri was a character played by actress Myrna Loy in the film The Desert Song (1929).

  • Usage of the baby name Azuri.

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…Which of the above names do you like best?

Source: IMDb

Numerology & Baby Names: Number 3

baby names that add up to 3, numerologically

Here are hundreds of baby names that have a numerological value of “3.”

I’ve sub-categorized them by overall totals, because I think that some of the intermediate numbers could have special significance to people as well.

Within each group, I’ve listed up to ten of the most popular “3” names per gender (according to the current U.S. rankings).

Beneath all the names are some ways you could interpret the numerological value of “3,” including descriptions from two different numerological systems.

3 via 12

The following baby names add up to 12, which reduces to three (1+2=3).

  • “12” girl names: Aja, Fae, Abi, Bee, Abha, Bia
  • “12” boy names: Cace, Gad, Jb

3 via 21

The following baby names add up to 21, which reduces to three (2+1=3).

  • “21” girl names: Kai, Asa, Gala, Jaeda, Jaia, Aara, Clea, Kia, Abiha, Abiah
  • “21” boy names: Kai, Kade, Asa, Alec, Ben, Beck, Cael, Cale, Hal, Ladd

3 via 30

The following baby names add up to 30, which reduces to three (3+0=3).

  • “30” girl names: Ella, Anna, Alice, Jane, Bianca, Abby, Noa, Bria, Celia, Liah
  • “30” boy names: Joe, Jean, Taha, Noa, Ken, Eesa, Rafe, Zac, Bodi, Tai

3 via 39

The following baby names add up to 39, which reduces to three (3+9=12; 1+2=3).

  • “39” girl names: Camila, Sara, Ayla, Mya, Amy, Gemma, Leila, Allie, Angel, Kira
  • “39” boy names: Angel, Declan, Sean, Kash, Drake, Jakob, Jon, Keagan, Lev, Edric

3 via 48

The following baby names add up to 48, which reduces to three (4+8=12; 1+2=3).

  • “48” girl names: Luna, Nora, Claire, Isabel, Teagan, Adriana, Daphne, Aviana, Sarai, Celine
  • “48” boy names: James, Ethan, Levi, Jonah, Graham, Theo, Malakai, Leland, Kamden, Jasiah

3 via 57

The following baby names add up to 57, which reduces to three (5+7=12; 1+2=3).

  • “57” girl names: Aaliyah, Rose, Mary, Adalyn, Hayden, Amiyah, Mariana, Willa, Kailani, Myra
  • “57” boy names: Owen, George, Hayden, Ellis, Major, Uriah, Colby, Chris, Layne, Franco

3 via 66

The following baby names add up to 66, which reduces to three (6+6=12; 1+2=3).

  • “66” girl names: Harper, Addison, Ruby, Emery, Ximena, Annabelle, Sloane, Brooke, Delaney, Jessica
  • “66” boy names: Charles, Xander, Beckett, Tobias, Manuel, Zayn, Romeo, Dalton, Royce, Esteban

3 via 75

The following baby names add up to 75, which reduces to three (7+5=12; 1+2=3).

  • “75” girl names: Madison, Quinn, Esther, Adelynn, Raelyn, Tatum, Annalise, Bethany, Kinslee, Simone
  • “75” boy names: Zayden, Marcus, Martin, Jeffrey, Quinn, Kendrick, Gunnar, Zachariah, Rowen, Luciano

3 via 84

The following baby names add up to 84, which reduces to three (8+4=12; 1+2=3).

  • “84” girl names: Ryleigh, Londyn, Jocelyn, Makenzie, Collins, Lennox, Zaniyah, Madalynn, Lillianna, Violeta
  • “84” boy names: Alexander, Austin, Leonardo, Nathaniel, Emmanuel, Barrett, Jaxton, Marshall, Lennox, Lawson

3 via 93

The following baby names add up to 93, which reduces to three (9+3=12; 1+2=3).

  • “93” girl names: Juniper, Elliott, Ashlynn, Sunny, Yamileth, Evalynn, Majesty, Cristina, Rhiannon, Brighton
  • “93” boy names: Bryson, Justin, Elliott, Cristian, Atticus, Tyson, Roberto, Arturo, Greysen, Brighton

3 via 102

The following baby names add up to 102, which reduces to three (1+0+2=12; 1+2=3).

  • “102” girl names: Charlotte, Juliette, Jazlynn, Whitley, Kaylynn, Kinzley, Katelynn, Gwyneth, Christiana, Gwenyth
  • “102” boy names: Harrison, Kingsley, Langston, Brixton, Humberto, Syrus, Huxton, Iverson, Yehoshua, Abdulaziz

3 via 111

The following baby names add up to 111, which reduces to three (1+1+1=3).

  • “111” girl names: Amethyst, Braylynn, Kynsley, Brystol, Bronwyn, Taylynn, Mattison, Rozalyn, Sarenity, Promyse
  • “111” boy names: Raymundo, Xzavion, Treston, Christos, Torsten, Panagiotis, Schuyler, Olajuwon, Tayshawn, Corinthian

3 via 120

The following baby names add up to 120, which reduces to three (1+2+0=3).

  • “120” girl names: Skylynn, Yaretzy, Lexington, Greylynn, Yuritza, Portlyn, Southern, Brittlyn, Ellowynn, Mattalynn
  • “120” boy names: Maximiliano, Ulysses, Lexington, Thompson, Leviticus, Arjunreddy, Philopater, Quintyn, Prentiss, Marquette

3 via 129

The following baby names add up to 129, which reduces to three (1+2+9=12; 1+2=3).

  • “129” girl names: Kourtney, Christalyn, Tzipporah, Oluwatomi, Riverrose, Stellamaris, Jazzalynn
  • “129” boy names: Augustus, Silvestre, Brookston, Constantin, Tobechukwu, Panayiotis, Toluwalase, Demetrious, Quinston, Kourtney

3 via 138

The following baby names add up to 138, which reduces to three (1+3+8=12; 1+2=3).

  • “138” girl names: Konstantina, Marylouise, Mojolaoluwa, Oluwaferanmi
  • “138” boy names: Thelonious, Toussaint, Marcoantonio, Zephyrus, Oluwaferanmi

3 via 147

The following baby names add up to 147, which reduces to three (1+4+7=12; 1+2=3).

  • “147” girl names: Autumnrose, Tirenioluwa
  • “147” boy names: Khristopher, Aristotelis

3 via 156

The boy name Ifeanyichukwu adds up to 156, which reduces to three (1+5+6=12; 1+2=3).

3 via 165

The unisex name Oluwatamilore adds up to 165, which reduces to three (1+6+5=12; 1+2=3).

What Does “3” Mean?

First, we’ll look at the significance assigned to “3” by two different numerological sources. Second, and more importantly, ask yourself if “3” or any of the intermediate numbers above have any special significance to you.

Numerological Attributes

“3” (the triad) according to the Pythagoreans:

  • “The triad has a special beauty and fairness beyond all numbers”
  • “Anything in Nature which has process has three boundaries (beginning, peak and end – that is, its limits and its middle), and two intervals (that is, increase and decrease), with the consequence that the nature of the dyad and ‘either’ manifests in the triad by means of its limits.”
  • “They call it ‘friendship’ and ‘peace,’ and further ‘harmony’ and ‘unanimity’: for these are all cohesive and unificatory of opposites and dissimilars. Hence they also call it ‘marriage.'”
  • “The triad is called ‘prudence’ and ‘wisdom’ – that is, when people act correctly as regards the present, look ahead to the future, and gain experience from what has already happened in the past: so wisdom surveys the three parts of time, and consequently knowledge falls under the triad.”
  • “We use the triad also for the manifestation of plurality, and say ‘thrice ten thousand’ when we mean ‘many times many,’ and ‘thrice blessed.'”

“3” according to Edgar Cayce:

  • “Three is the strength of one with the weakness of two” (reading 261-15).
  • ‘Three – again a combination of one and two; this making for strength, making for – in division – that ability of two against one, or one against two. In this strength is seen, as in the Godhead, and is as a greater strength in the whole of combinations” (reading 5751-1).
Personal/Cultural Significance

Does “3” — or do any of the other numbers above (e.g., 21, 57, 66, 111) — have any special significance to you?

Think about your own preferences and personal experiences: lucky numbers, birth dates, music, sports, and so on. Maybe you’re fascinated by the history of old Route 66, for example.

Also think about associations you may have picked up from your culture, your religion, or society in general.

If you have any interesting insights about the number 3, or any of the other numbers above, please leave a comment!

Source: Theologumena Arithmeticae, attributed to Iamblichus (c.250-c.330).

Biggest Changes in Girl Name Popularity, 2016

Which girl names increased the most in popularity from 2015 to 2016? Which ones decreased the most?

The SSA likes to answer this question by analyzing ranking differences within the top 1,000. I like to answer it by looking at raw number differences that take the full list into account. So let’s check out the results using both methods…

Girl Names: Biggest Increases, 2015 to 2016

baby names, girl names, more popular

Rankings

1. Kehlani, +2,487 spots — up from 3,359th to 872nd
2. Royalty, +618 spots — up from 1,150th to 532nd
3. Saoirse, +465 spots — up from 1,448th to 983rd
4. Ophelia, +396 spots — up from 976th to 580th
5. Aitana, +368 spots — up from 917th to 549th
6. Itzayana, +356 spots — up from 1,125th to 769th
7. Alessia, +348 spots — up from 1,175th to 827th
8. Kaylani, +301 spots — up from 1,056th to 755th
9. Avianna, +298 spots — up from 751st to 453rd
10. Nalani, +294 spots — up from 1,280th to 986th

Kehlani and Kaylani were influenced by singer/songwriter Kehlani Parrish. (Kehlani was the top debut name of 2015, and variant Khelani debuted impressively in 2016.)

Royalty was influenced by the R&B singer Chris Brown, whose daughter (b. 2014) and 7th album (2015) were both called Royalty.

Saoirse was influenced by Irish actress Saoirse Ronan — perhaps specifically by those American talk show appearances in which she talked to the hosts (Ellen DeGeneres, Stephen Colbert, etc.) about how to pronounce her name. Plus there was that widely circulated Ryan Gosling quote on the same topic (“It’s Ser-sha, like inertia”).

Alessia was influenced by singer/songwriter Alessia Cara.

Raw Numbers

1. Adeline, +1,700 baby girls — up from 2,403 to 4,103
2. Charlotte, +1,649 baby girls — up from 11,381 to 13,030
3. Riley, +1,390 baby girls — up from 5,720 to 7,110
4. Adaline, +971 baby girls — up from 902 to 1,873
5. Amelia, +864 baby girls — up from 9,838 to 10,702
6. Luna, +849 baby girls — up from 2,796 to 3,645
7. Emilia, +804 baby girls — up from 2,215 to 3,019
8. Camila, +765 baby girls — up from 5,271 to 6,036
9. Nova, +754 baby girls — up from 1,518 to 2,272
10. Evelyn, +708 baby girls — up from 9,352 to 10,060

Adeline and Adaline were influenced, at least initially, by the movie The Age of Adaline (2015).

Other names that saw raw number increases in the 200+ range included Eleanor, Teagan, Kinsley, Scarlett, Everly, Quinn, Aria, Remi, Harper, Penelope, Thea, Claire, Rowan, Hazel, Ruby, Blake, Aurora, Ivy, Harley, Eloise, Willow, Elena, Josephine, Alice, Blakely, Saylor, Nora, Leia, Iris, Margot, Isla, Freya, Samara, Joy, Zara, Eliana, Joanna, and Malia.

Girl Names: Biggest Decreases, 2015 to 2016

baby names, girl names, less popular

Rankings

1. Caitlin, -542 spots — down from 609th to 1,151st
2. Caitlyn, -462 spots — down from 598th to 1,060th
3. Katelynn, -402 spots — down from 652nd to 1,054th
4. Kaitlynn, -381 spots — down from 994th to 1,375th
5. Neriah, -344 spots — down from 943rd to 1,287th
6. Bryanna, -276 spots — down from 783rd to 1,059th
7. Kiley, -275 spots — down from 898th to 1,173rd
8. Yaritza, -271 spots — down from 935th to 1,206th
9. Denise, -210 spots — down from 993rd to 1,203rd
10. Kaelyn, -203 spots — down from 521st to 724th

caitlyn jenner, magazine coverCaitlin, Caitlyn, Katelynn, and Kaitlynn, were negatively influenced by Caitlyn Jenner (formerly Bruce Jenner), who appeared on the cover of Vanity Fair in mid-2015 with the headline “Call me Caitlyn.”

This reminds me of what happened a few decades ago to Hillary — another name that was strongly associated for a time with a female who wasn’t conforming to gender norms. Perhaps tellingly, the name Bruce wasn’t hit nearly as hard. Jenner did fall of the charts, though.

Raw Numbers

1. Sophia, -1,311 baby girls — down from 17,381 to 16,070
2. Alexa, -1,289 baby girls — down from 6,049 to 4,760
3. Madison, -1,090 baby girls — down from 10,072 to 8,982
4. Emma, -1,001 baby girls — down from 20,415 to 19,414 (…but still the #1 name overall)
5. Aubrey, -869 baby girls — down from 7,376 to 6,507
6. Isabella, -852 baby girls — down from 15,574 to 14,722
7. Emily, -840 baby girls — down from 11,766 to 10,926
8. Kylie, -753 baby girls — down from 4,149 to 3,396
9. Alexis, -744 baby girls — down from 3,406 to 2,662
10. Abigail, -672 baby girls — down from 12,371 to 11,699

Other names that saw raw number drops in the 200+ range included Kaitlyn, Avery, Allison, Alyssa, London, Kaylee, Sofia, Katelyn, Kimberly, Zoey, Mia, Chloe, Kendall, Taylor, Sadie, Khloe, Mackenzie, Hannah, Peyton, Addison, Samantha, Ashley, Olivia, Gabriella, Brianna, Lauren, Anna, Brooklyn, Morgan, Jocelyn, Sydney, Natalie, Victoria, Makayla, Zoe, Hailey, Payton, Brooke, Annabelle, Trinity, Keira, Adalyn, Jordyn, Kayla, Molly, Audrey, Faith, Madelyn, Lillian, Caitlin, Caitlyn, Makenzie, Paige, Aaliyah, Paisley, Nevaeh, Elizabeth, Amy, and Jessica.

Interesting how certain like-names went in opposite directions last year. Leia, Alessia, and Adaline rose; Leah, Alyssa, and Adalyn fell.

Do you have any other explanations/guesses about any of the names above? If so, please comment!

(In 2015, the big winners were Alexa and Alaia, and the big losers were Isabella and Isis.)

Sources: Change in Popularity from 2015 to 2016, Emma and Noah Remain Social Security’s Most Popular Baby Names for 2016

Name Quotes #46 – Chloe, Lucille, Iowa

toni morrison, toni, chloe, chloe wofford, books, quote, quotation

From a New York Magazine article about author Toni Morrison, born Chloe Wofford, who “deeply regrets” not putting her birth name on her books:

“Wasn’t that stupid?” she says. “I feel ruined!” Here she is, fount of indelible names (Sula, Beloved, Pilate, Milkman, First Corinthians, and the star of her new novel, the Korean War veteran Frank Money), and she can’t own hers. “Oh God! It sounds like some teenager–what is that?” She wheeze-laughs, theatrically sucks her teeth. “But Chloe.” She grows expansive. “That’s a Greek name. People who call me Chloe are the people who know me best,” she says. “Chloe writes the books.” Toni Morrison does the tours, the interviews, the “legacy and all of that.”

From the Amazon bio of author Caitlin Moran:

Caitlin isn’t really her name. She was christened ‘Catherine.’ But she saw ‘Caitlin’ in a Jilly Cooper novel when she was thirteen and thought it looked exciting. That’s why she pronounces it incorrectly: ‘Catlin.’ It causes trouble for everyone.

From the book Brando: Songs My Mother Taught Me by Marlon Brando and Robert Lindsey:

I have been told that I was born one hour before midnight, April 3, 1924, in the Omaha Maternity Hospital. […] My mother, Dorothy Pennebaker Brando, was 27; my father, Marlon Brando Sr., was 29. I rounded out the family and made it complete: My sister Jocelyn was almost 5 when I was born, my other sister Frances almost 2. Each of us had nicknames: My mother’s was Dodie; my father’s Bowie, although he was Pop to me and Poppa to my sisters; Jocelyn was Tiddy; Frances was Frannie; and I was Bud.

(Here’s more about the name Brando.)

From Article 7 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (1990):

The child shall be registered immediately after birth and shall have the right from birth to a name, the right to acquire a nationality and, as far as possible, the right to know and be cared for by his or her parents.

From an NPR article about the naming of B. B. King’s guitar Lucille:

I used to play a place in Arkansas called Twist, Ark., and they used to have a little nightclub there that we played quite often. […] Well, it used to get quite cold in Twist, and they used to take something look like a big garbage pail and set it in the middle of the floor, half-fill it with kerosene. They would light that fuel, and that’s what we used for heat. And generally, the people would dance around it, you know, never disturb this container. But this particular night, two guys start to fight and then one of them knocked the other one over on this container, and when they did, it spilled on the floor. Now it was already burning, so when it spilled, it looked like a river of fire, and everybody ran for the front door, including yours truly. But when I got on the outside, then I realized that I’d left my guitar inside. I went back for it. The building was a wooden building, and it was burning so fast when I got my guitar, it started to collapse around me. So I almost lost my life trying to save the guitar. But the next morning, we found that these two guys who was fighting was fighting about a lady. I never did meet the lady, but I learned that her name was Lucille. So I named my guitar Lucille and reminded me not to do a thing like that again.

(B. B. King’s birth name is Riley; “B. B.” stands for “Blues Boy.”)

From an article about roller derby skate names:

Some other things we noticed: 10 percent of the list falls into the “Tech & Geek” category, which includes names inspired by Computing (“Paige Not Found,” “Syntax Terror,” “Ctrl Alt Defeat”) fonts (“Crimes New Roman,” “Give ‘Em Hell Vetica”); Chemistry (“Carmen Die Oxide,” “ChLauraform”); and Philosophy (“Blockem’s Razor”).

From an interview with David Lisson, registrar-general of Northern Territory, Australia:

“I once had parents that came in with 11 given names for their baby,” Mr Lisson said.

“We had a long talk with them to explain how difficult it would be to fill out forms.

“They had an answer for basically all of them, as they were from a diverse cultural background. Each name had a significance. After some hard bargaining, we got them down to nine.”

From a 1909 article in Hampton’s Magazine about Woman’s Relief Corps president Jennie Iowa Berry (1866-1951):

Mrs. Berry is a native of Iowa. Her father is Wilbur Riley Peet, a soldier of the Sixties, who was born in Iowa when it was still a territory, his people having been among the pioneer settlers. His love for his State is indicated by the second name of his daughter.

(The name Iowa last appeared in the SSA data in 1921.)

Want to see more? Here’s the name quotes category.