How popular is the baby name Johanna in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Johanna.

The graph will take a few seconds to load, thanks for your patience. (Don't worry, it shouldn't take nine months.) If it's taking too long, try reloading the page.


Popularity of the Baby Name Johanna


Posts that Mention the Name Johanna

The Origin of Gia

gia scala, actress

The Italian name Gia is a pet form of Gianna, which itself is a contracted form of Giovanna (akin to Joanna). But Gia as a standalone name was very rare in the U.S. until the late 1950s, when usage increased enough for the name to debut in the SSA’s (publicly available) data:

  • 1960: 41 baby girls named Gia
  • 1959: 51 baby girls named Gia
  • 1958: 43 baby girls named Gia
  • 1957: 18 baby girls named Gia [debut]
  • 1956: unlisted

What gave it a boost? The first famous Gia in America, actress Gia Scala, whose career took off in the late 1950s.

Her “real” name is hard to pin down. She was born in England with the name Josephine Scoglio. But…she spent her childhood in Italy, and when she applied for U.S. citizenship in 1957, she said her legal name was Giovanna Scoglio.

In any case, she started going by Gia not long after she moved to the U.S. (in the early 1950s), and Universal Studios gave her the stage name “Gia Scala” at the start of her film career.

number of babies named Gia, popularity graph

Since then, several other famous Gias have also influenced the charts…

  • Fashion model Gia Marie Carangi was at the peak of her fame in the late ’70s and early ’80s. It doesn’t look like her modeling career had any impact on the baby name Gia, but when the TV movie Gia starring Angelina Jolie came out in 1998, usage of the name more than tripled, and the compound name Giamarie debuted.
  • Usage more than doubled from 2009 to 2011 (when Gia peaked in the national rankings at 300th place) thanks to two people: reality TV contestant Gia Allamand, who appeared on both The Bachelor and Bachelor Pad in 2010, and celebrity baby Gia Francesca, born to Mario Lopez and his wife in September of 2010.

Do you like the name Gia? Would you ever use it?

Sources: Gia Scala – Glamour Girls of the Silver Screen, Gia Scala – Wikipedia

P.S. Gia Allamand was on the same season of The Bachelor as Tenley Molzahn, whose name, Tenley, also happened to be a 1950s debut in the SSA data.

Popular Baby Names in Austria, 2018

According to Statistics Austria, the most popular baby names in the country in 2018 were Anna and Paul.

Here are Austria’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2018:

Girl Names

  1. Anna – used for 869 baby girls (2.1%)
  2. Emma
  3. Laura
  4. Marie
  5. Lena (2-way tie)
  6. Mia (2-way tie)
  7. Emilia
  8. Sophia
  9. Johanna
  10. Valentina

Boy Names

  1. Paul – used for 830 baby boys (1.9%)
  2. David
  3. Jakob
  4. Maximilian
  5. Felix
  6. Elias
  7. Alexander
  8. Lukas
  9. Leon
  10. Tobias

In the girls’ top 10, Valentina replaces Sophie.

In the boys’ top 10, Leon replaces Jonas.

And in 2017, the two top names in the country were Anna and Maximilian.

Source: First Names of newborn babies 2018

Popular Baby Names in Austria, 2017

According to Statistics Austria, the most popular baby names in the country in 2017 were Anna and Maximilian.

Here are Austria’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2017:

Girl Names
1. Anna, 949 baby girls
2. Emma, 825
3. Marie, 674
4. Lena, 665
5. Laura, 656
6. Sophia, 649
7. Emilia, 618
8. Mia, 574
9. Sophie, 560
10. Johanna, 553

Boy Names
1. Maximilian, 908 baby boys
2. Paul, 814
3. David, 798
4. Elias, 783 (tie)
4. Jakob, 783 (tie)
6. Lukas, 760
7. Felix, 747
8. Alexander, 742
9. Tobias, 741
10. Jonas, 726

In 2016, Austria’s top two names were Anna and David.

Austria also puts out a set of rankings that combines names with the same etymological roots. On that list, the top name groups were:

  • “Anna” (Ana, Ann, Anna, Anne, Annè, Chana, Channa, Haina, Hana, Hanah, Hanna, Hannah, Hanne, Hena, Iana, Jaana, Jana, Janah, Jannah, Yahna, Yana), and
  • “Lukas” (Luc, Luca, Lucas, Lúcás, Lucca, Luka, Lukas, Lukás, Lukáš, Lukasz, Łukasz, Luke).

Source: Anna und Maximilian waren 2017 die beliebtesten Babynamen

Name Quotes #60: Kelvin, Reese, Nyadak

name quote, benedict cumberbatch

A Benedict Cumberbatch quote from a recent episode [vid] of The Late Show with Stephen Colbert:

I think England is the only place that makes people named Benedict Cumberbatch.

From an article about a Swedish woman who changed her son’s name because of a botched tattoo:

Local newspaper, Blekinge Läns Tidning, reported that 30-year-old Johanna Giselhäll Sandström had requested a tattoo of her children’s names, Nova and Kevin.

The tattoo artist didn’t ask the woman to check the spelling, which resulted in a tattoo that read: ‘Nova and Kelvin’.

[…]

After discovering the process of removing tattoos isn’t an easy one, Sandström began to realise the name was growing on her, so she opted for a less painful solution to the problem.

“We decided to rename the boy,” she said.

From a Slate essay about unusual Mormon names by Haley Swenson:

By now, I’ve heard all the jokes about Utah names, but what I haven’t heard is a unified theory of just why the Mormon people of Utah are so inclined to create them. I humbly offer two hypotheses.

The first is my historical-cultural theory—that the penchant for invented names among Mormons lies in its very foundation: It goes all the way back to its founder, Joseph Smith, who had to come up with the names of hundreds of figures to populate the faith’s foundational text that he wrote, the Book of Mormon.

[…]

My second theory is more sociological. […] [I]f you’re a Mormon kid in Utah, it can be hard to stand out from the pack. A differently spelled name or a new name altogether might be a reasonable way to firm up a sense of individuality from the first day. Why bring yet another Erin into the world when you can introduce an Aeryn, or better yet, an Aroarin?

From an article about the pregnancy of Jacinda Ardern, Prime Minister of New Zealand:

Ardern told More FM she and partner Clarke Gayford had a list of baby names that wasn’t getting any shorter and had no favourites.

Picking a name wasn’t going well, she said.

“It’s one of those things where Clarke is absolutely convinced it will come to us as soon as it arrives.

“I think we’ll be sleep deprived and probably angry at each other so I don’t think that’s the best time to choose.”

From an article about a girl named after Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups:

When Renee Cupp became pregnant with her daughter, she toyed around with a few names. For a while, Lily was the front runner, until she and her husband had the idea to name their second child after their favorite chocolate and peanut butter candy. So, eight years ago, the couple printed the name Reese Eve Cupp on their daughter’s birth certificate.

Although the correct pronunciation of the candy is “Rees-IS,” Cupp tells PEOPLE that she has always pronounced it “Rees-EES,” which is a common inflection of the popular chocolate brand, thus the addition of her daughter’s middle initial.

From an article about drug naming trends in The Times (via ANS):

[Dr. Pascaline Faure] said that a clear trend was for names ending in “a” associated with femininity, as in “Maria”, or an “o”, which is masculine, as in “Mario”. “This is turning a drug into a sort of mate. It can be a girlfriend, with women’s attributes, or a boyfriend, with male ones,” she said.

From the essay “Why We Didn’t Name Our Son After His Grandfather, a Holocaust Survivor” by Jasmine Smith in Kveller:

I want my son, who is almost 2, to feel the history of his ancestors as something joyful and not heavy. I want him to recognize all the improbable elements that had to align; all the miracles that kept his grandfathers alive through their difficult lives long enough to create the families that would lead to his birth. I hope that, by giving him the gift of an unburdened name, he will be able to create a life that is equally as incredible as his grandfathers’ — a life that is already miraculous just by existing.

From an interview with fashion model Nyadak “Duckie” Thot:

In Melbourne, Australia, where she was born and raised in a culturally traditional Sudanese household with her mom, dad and six siblings, her peers at school couldn’t pronounce her real name, and it got to an unbearable point. […] Of course, neither name was something commonly found amongst Australian citizens. As she explains, both the words “Nyadak” and “Thot” are, in fact, Nuer, a South Sudanese language that’s native to the Nuer tribe. “Oh yeah,” she says wryly after noticing my surprised facial expression. “Many people don’t know I come from a tribe.”

Want to see more quotes about names? Check out the name quotes category.