How popular is the baby name Kasara in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Kasara and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Kasara.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Kasara

Number of Babies Named Kasara

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Kasara

Mystery Baby Name – Sumiko

(Welcome to mystery week! This is the first of 5 posts featuring baby names that saw sudden popularity increases that I can’t quite figure out. Maybe you guys can help?)

In 1980, over 100 baby girls were suddenly given the name Sumiko (or some variant thereof):

Name 1979 1980 1981 1982
Sumiko 5 31 7 5
Semiko** 23 8
Samika 7 22 20 14
Sameka 12 21 12 9
Sumeka** 14
Sumika** 11
Semeka 8 7 6
Sameko** 7
Samica 7
Semico** 7
Simeko** 7
Sumeko** 7
Semeko** 6
Semika 6 7 7
Sameika** 5

**Debuted on the SSA’s baby name list in 1980.

What prompted the Sumiko spike? I’m not sure.

The various spellings suggest that people were hearing the name, but not seeing it written down (as with Kasara and Deirdre). So the source is likely to be a song, a movie, or a TV show.

The only possibility I’ve come up with so far is a minor character from The Young and The Restless named Sumiko. According to various soap opera websites, Sumiko was a cult leader (!) who began appearing on the show in early 1980.

Do you have any other ideas?

The Mysterious Baby Name LaQuita

When the popularity of a particular baby name spikes, there’s always an explanation.

Most of the time, the explanation isn’t hard to come up with. Hundreds of baby girls were named Rhiannon after Fleetwood Mac’s Rhiannon was released in 1976, dozens of baby boys were named Rambo after the Rambo movies started coming out in the early 1980s, and so forth.

Sometimes, the explanation isn’t as conspicuous. I didn’t immediately see the connection between the name Aquanette and B-movie actress Burnu Acquanetta, for instance. Only after mulling it over for a while was I able to link the name Kasara to a long-forgotten Lisa Lisa song.

Today’s name belongs in that latter group. In fact, the explanation for today’s name is *so* inconspicuous that I haven’t been able to piece it together, even after months of trying.

So I’m giving up. I’m just going to post what I know and hope that some wise soul leaves a comment that helps me unravel the mystery. :)

The name is Laquita. (It’s often written LaQuita in obituaries.) It debuted on the SSA’s baby name list in 1930, coming out of nowhere to be given to an impressive 68 baby girls that year.

Now, the number 68 might seem trivial. Today’s most popular names are given to tens of thousands of babies each, after all. As far as newbie names go, though, 68 is huge. Especially when you’re talking about the early 20th century. Here’s some context:

  • Top debut names of 1926: Narice, 13; Bibb, 15
  • Top debut names of 1927: Sunya, 14; Bidwell, 14
  • Top debut names of 1928: Joreen, 22; Alfread & Brevard, 9
  • Top debut names of 1929: Jeannene, 26; Donnald, Edsol, Rhys & Wolfgang, 8
  • Top debut names of 1930: Laquita, 68; Shogo, 11
  • Top debut names of 1931: Joanie, 12; Rockne, 17
  • Top debut names of 1932: Carolann, Delano & Jenine, 11; Alvyn, Avelardo, Elena, Mannon & Wenford, 7
  • Top debut names of 1933: Gayleen, 23; Skippy, 10
  • Top debut names of 1934: Carollee & Janean, 12; Franchot, 9

Laquita jumped into the top 1,000 right away, ranking 874th. It remained there for the next three years.

Here’s a final fact that could be helpful. Of the 25 1930-Laquitas listed in the SSDI so far, most were born during the last half of the year — 2 in May, 3 in June, 3 in July, 5 in August, 5 in September, 3 in October, 1 in November, 3 in December. This may mean that a mid-year event triggered the spike.


Baby Names Inspired by Misheard Song Lyrics?

lost in emotion, lisa lisa music vido, que sera que seraDo you ever mishear song lyrics?

I do. All the time. (Though I’m not nearly as bad as my husband.)

I ask because I believe today’s baby names can be traced back to a specific set of lyrics misheard by dozens of parents a little more than 20 years ago.


The Names

Casara, Kasarah, Cassara, and Casarah all debuted on the SSA’s baby name list in 1987. The same year, Kasara returned after being listed only once before (in the mid-1970s). And in 1988, Cassarah made its first and only appearance.

Name 1986 1987 1988 1989
Kasara 22 44 19
Casara 17 34 10
Kasarah 10 25 17
Cassara 9 18 10
Casarah 7 12 10
Cassarah 5

At first I couldn’t figure them out. They didn’t look like alternative spellings of a more popular name. They all popped up at about the same time, pointing to a single pop culture source, but the origin wasn’t obvious (as it had been with names like Daughtry and Cheetara.)

Finally, months after discovering them, I came up with a decent theory.

The Song

Let’s set the scene. Artists on the radio back in 1987 included U2, George Michael, Whitney Houston, Tiffany, Billy Idol, Madonna, The Bangles, Bon Jovi, Kim Wilde, Los Lobos with “La Bamba,” Belinda Carlisle, Exposé, Atlantic Starr…and Lisa Lisa and Cult Jam.

In fact, 1987 was a great year for Lisa Lisa and Cult Jam. Their second album, Spanish Fly, went platinum in August. Two songs from the album ended up becoming Billboard #1 singles — “Head to Toe” in June, “Lost In Emotion” in October.

I’m sure you’ve heard “Lost in Emotion” before, but here’s the video just in case. (How awesome are those outfits, btw?)

Pay special attention to the following lines [starting at 1:27]:

Que sera, que sera
Baby, whatever will be
Que sera, que sera
Between you and me

The Connection

That “que sera, que sera” in the chorus is a corruption of the phrase “que sera, sera,” taken from the earlier song “Que Sera, Sera.” The phrase is commonly thought to mean “whatever will be, will be,” though that’s not quite true.

Anyway, to someone casually listening to “Lost in Emotion” on the radio, the words “que sera” blend together and sound just like Kasara, Casara, and the other names above.

The Proof

Well, not “proof” exactly. But an enticing bit of evidence.

I did a search for anyone (a blogger, say) who’d written about mistaking “que sera” for a girl name. Just to see if anyone could back me up.

Check out this comment I found at song site Am I Right:

Lisa Lisa and Cult Jam’s, “Lost In Emotion”

The Misheard Lyrics:
Kassarah, Kassarah

The Real Lyrics:
Lost in emotion Que sera, que sera.

The Story: My sister named my niece Kassarah after this song. Ooops, oh well a beautifully unique name for a beautiful, unique girl! – Submitted by: Sandee

Jackpot. :)

(Incidentally, the spelling Kassarah has never appeared on any of the SSA’s baby name lists.)

The Conclusion

So that’s what I suspect — in the late ’80s, dozens of expectant parents heard Lisa Lisa’s “Lost in Emotion,” interpreted “que sera” as a female name, and used the misheard lyric as a baby name, spelling it various ways (e.g. Kasara, Casara, Kasarah).

But I’d love to hear other theories if anyone out there has a better explanation.

P.S. Other baby name mysteries I’ve talked about (or solved!): the first airplane baby, the disappearing gas card baby, the babies (not) named after Aqua Net, and the great baby name glitch of 1989.