How popular is the baby name Katina in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Katina.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Katina


Posts that Mention the Name Katina

Rare Girl Names from Early Cinema: Letter K

karanina, k-names, cinema, girl names

Looking for an uncommon K-name for your baby girl? Here’s the next installment of rare female names collected from very old films (released from the 1910s to the 1940s). For those names that saw enough usage to register in the national data set, I’ve included links to the popularity graphs.

Kabirah
Kabirah was a character played by actress Emily Seville in the film Kismet (1920).

Kalaniweo
Kalaniweo was a character played by actress Enid Markey in the film Aloha Oe (1915).

Kalora
Kalora was a character played by actress Ruth Stonehouse in the film The Slim Princess (1915) and by actress Mabel Normand in the remake The Slim Princess (1920).

Kaluna
Kaluna was a character played by actress Betty Schade in the short film Isle of Abandoned Hope (1914).

Kamamamalua
Kamamamalua was a character played by actress Hilo Hattie in the film Miss Tatlock’s Millions (1948).

Kameela
Kameela was a character played by actress Ann Rork in the film The Notorious Lady (1927)

Karamaneh
Karamaneh was a character played by either of two actresses, Joan Clarkson and Dorinea Shirley, in various short films, including The Shrine of the Seven Lamps and The Cafe L’Egypte, during the 1920s.

Karanina
Karanina “Nina” Novak was a character played by actress Anne Shirley in the film Four Jacks and a Jill (1942).

Karin
Karin Touzac was a character played by actress Merle Oberon in the film This Love of Ours (1945).

  • Usage of the baby name Karin.

Karsha
Karsha was a character played by actress Florence Bates in the film Kismet (1944).

  • Usage of the baby name Karsha.

Katha
Katha was a character played by actress Helen Twelvetrees in the film All Men Are Enemies (1934).

  • Usage of the baby name Katha.

Kathe
Kathe was a character played by actress Dorothy Tree in the film Sky Murder (1940).

  • Usage of the baby name Kathe (which debuted in the data the year Sky Murder came out).

Kathlyn
Kathlyn Williams was an actress who appeared in films from the 1900s to the 1930s. She was born in Montana in 1879. Her birth name was Kathleen Mabel Williams. Kathlyn was also a character played by actress Bessie Eyton in the film The City of Purple Dreams (1918).

Katina
Katina Paxinou was an actress who appeared in films from the 1940s to the 1970s. She was born in Greece in 1900. Her birth name was Ekaterini Konstantopoulou. Katina was also a character played by actress Sonja Henie in the film Iceland (1942).

  • Usage of the baby name Katina.

Katinka
Katinka was a character name in multiple films, including The Seven Sisters (1915) and The Seventh Day (1922).

Katrin
Katrin was a character name in multiple films, including The Farmer’s Daughter (1947) and I Remember Mama (1948).

  • Usage of the baby name Katrin.

Katrine
Katrine Van Ryn was a character played by actress Connie Marshall in the film Dragonwyck (1946).

Katuma
Katuma was a character played by actress Tsuru Aoki in the short film A Relic of Old Japan (1914).

Katyusha
Katyusha Maslova was a character played by various actresses (such as Florence Lawrence, Pauline Frederick, Dolores del Rio, Lupe Velez) in various movies called Resurrection, all based on the novel of the same name by Leo Tolstoy.

Kawista
Kawista was a character played by actress Edith Storey in the short film Return of Ta-Wa-Wa (1910).

Kay
Kay Laurel was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in Pennsylvania in 1890. Her birth name was Ruth Leslie. Kay Aldridge was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1940s. Aldridge was born in Florida in 1917. Kay was also a character name in multiple films, including The Scarlet Honeymoon (1925) and Mrs. Miniver (1942).

  • Usage of the baby name Kay.

Kazia
Kazia was a character played by actress Madlaine Traverse in the film Fruits of Desire (1916).

  • Usage of the baby name Kazia.

Kealani
Kealani was a character name in multiple films, including The Sea Flower (1918) and Isle of Lost Men (1928).

Kedzie
Kedzie Thropp was a character played by actress Wanda Hawley in the film We Can’t Have Everything (1918).

  • Usage of the baby name Kedzie.

Keema
Keema was a character played by actress Gloria Roy in the film Mr. Moto Takes a Chance (1938)

  • Usage of the baby name Keema.

Kee-on-ee
Kee-on-ee was a character played by two actresses, Marie Walcamp and Lule Warrenton, in the short film The Werewolf (1913), which is considered the first-ever werewolf film.

Kelcey
Kelcey Dale was a character played by actress Carmel Myers in the film The Understanding Heart (1927).

  • Usage of the baby name Kelcey.

Kentucky
Kentucky was a character played by actress Anita Page in the film Our Modern Maidens (1929).

Keok
Keok was a character played by actress Anna May Wong in the film The Alaskan (1924).

Ketty
Ketty Galanta was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s. Her birth name was Ekaterina De Galantha.

  • Usage of the baby name Ketty.

Kettisha
Kettisha was a character played by actress Doris Lloyd in film Phantom Lady (1944)

Kichimatsu
Kichimatsu was a character played by actress Clara Kimball Young in the short film Jack’s Chrysanthemum (1913).

Kiki
Kiki was a character name in multiple films, including Kiki (1931) and The Dude Goes West (1948).

  • Usage of the baby name Kiki.

Kiliki
Kiliki was a character played by actress Maida Vale in the film Vengeance of the Deep (1923).

Kissmoia
Kissmoia was a character played by actress Tsuru Aoki in the short films A Tragedy of the Orient (1914) and The Curse of Caste (1914).

Kit
Kit Lamson was a character played by actress Maxine Elliott Hicks in the film East Side – West Side (1923).

  • Usage of the baby name Kit.

Kittens
Kittens Reichert was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in New York in 1910. Her birth name was Catherine Alma Reichert. Kittens was also a character played by actress Dorothy Abril in the film Rouge and Riches (1920).

Kittie
Kittie Swasher was a character played by actress Madge Kennedy in the film The Girl with the Jazz Heart (1921).

  • Usage of the baby name Kittie.

Kitty
Kitty Gordon was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s. She was born in England in 1878. Her birth name was Constance Blades. Kitty was also a character name in multiple films, including Five Star Final (1931) and The Challenge (1948).

  • Usage of the baby name Kitty.

Klari
Klari was a character played by actress Lynn Bari in the film The Baroness and the Butler (1938).

Kleopatra
Kleopatra “Kleo” Johnson was a character played by actress Etta McDaniel in the film Life with Henry (1940).

Klondike
Klondike was a character played by actress Thelma Todd in the film Klondike (1932).

Klyda
Klyda was a character played by actress Ormi Hawley in the short film A Thief in the Night (1915).

  • Usage of the baby name Klyda.

Knudka
Knudka was a character played by actress Nina Campana in the film Call of the Yukon (1938).

Konia
Konia Markham was a character played by actress Betty Compson in the film The White Flower (1923).

Korah
Korah Harley was a character played by actress Elissa Landi in the film Knowing Men (1930).

  • Usage of the baby name Korah.

Kostina
Kostina was a character played by actress Margaret Gibson in the short film When the Gods Forgive (1914).

Kuulei
Kuulei De Clercq was an actress who appeared in two films in 1937. She was born in Hawaii in 1927. Her sister was Nalani.

  • Usage of the baby name Kuulei.

Kye
Kye Allen was a character played by actress Constance Bennett in the film Sin Town (1942).

  • Usage of the baby name Kye.

…Which of the above names do you like best?

Source: IMDb

What Caused the Kalene Spike of ’93?

A couple of months ago, I got an email from someone who wanted to know why the baby name Kalene saw so much usage all of a sudden in 1993.

usage of baby name kalene spiked in 1993

That year, the name reached the the top 1,000 for the first and only time. So did Kaylene.

Other Kalene-like names also saw higher usage in 1993, and at least one of them (Kaylean) was a newbie in the data.

Year Kalene Kaylene Kayleen
1995 41 110 147
1994 85 144 157
1993 204 [peak] 197 [peak] 163
1992 24 91 119
1991 7 77 139

I’d figured out the causes of similar spikes for similar names (Kaleena, Kaelin, Katina), but hadn’t gotten around to Kalene yet.

So I did some research. And I didn’t come up with anything useful until I found myself on the Kalene page of a random baby name site where several people happened to mention the same Hooked on Phonics commercial:

  • “…I seen a Hooked on Phonics Commercial…”
  • “…my mom got it off of the hooked on phonics commercial…”
  • “…I too saw the name on the Hooked On Phonics commercial…”
  • “…My mom got it off the commercial in the 1990’s…”
  • …”My mom named me Kalene because she saw it on tv…”
  • “…my name was originally Christie but my mom saw a ‘hooked on phonics’ commercial about a month after i was born and she changed my name…”

One of my favorite things ever is discovering cheesy pop culture enshrined in the baby name data (excellent example: Kebrina), so finding out that a Hooked on Phonics commercial influenced U.S. baby names was pretty epic for me.

Is this Kalene??
Since that point, I’ve been searching for that specific Hooked on Phonics commercial featuring Kalene.

On YouTube I found a segment of a Hooked on Phonics commercial with a Cindy Brady-esque little girl (at right). She seemed promising…but the segment didn’t include her name on-screen.

That said, I did find a discussion thread from the 1990s — a cool piece of internet history in and of itself — that independently verified the existence of a Hooked on Phonics commercial featuring a girl named Kalene. So that was helpful.

(The search for a decades-old commercial is reminding me of our adventures with Deneen.)

So I’m not sure whether or not we’ve found Kalene yet, but one of the other Hooked on Phonics commercials I saw spotlighted a girl named Kia:

hooked on phonics, kia, 1993
“Hooked on Phonics” Kia

And, like Kalene, the name Kia saw its highest-ever usage in 1993, reaching 648th place in the national rankings. (The first Kia cars that were sold in the U.S. weren’t available until early 1994.)

  • 1995: 211 baby girls named Kia
  • 1994: 229 baby girls named Kia
  • 1993: 344 baby girls named Kia
  • 1992: 247 baby girls named Kia
  • 1991: 253 baby girls named Kia

…So now we have two Hooked on Phonics-influenced baby names. Amazing.

Question of the Day: Do you remember any other names from old Hooked on Phonics commercials? The company was advertising heavily on TV back in the 1990s — that much I remember — but I can’t recall any specific names from the commercials. Please leave a comment if you can think of any!

The Trendiest Baby Names of All Time?

I’m no stats whiz, but Nathan Yau of FlowingData and David Taylor of Prooffreader are, and each has taken a stab at determining/ranking the trendiest baby names of all time in the U.S.

The FlowingData list of trendiest baby names was published last year. Nathan analyzed girl names and boy names separately. Here are his top 5 for each gender:

Trendiest Girl Names Trendiest Boy Names
1. Catina
2. Deneen
3. Aaliyah
4. Allisson
5. Katina
1. Jalen
2. Tevin
3. Elian
4. Demond
5. Mcarthur

The Prooffreader list of trendiest baby names was published earlier this month. David analyzed all the names together (his overall top 100 was 80% girl names, 20% boy names). Here are his top 5 for each gender (with placement on the original list in parentheses):

Trendiest Girl Names Trendiest Boy Names
1. Linda (#1)
2. Brittany (#3)
3. Debra (#4)
4. Shirley (#5)
5. Ashley (#6)
1. Dewey (#2)
2. Jason (#11)
3. Grover (#15)
4. Mark (#20)
5. Woodrow (#30)

Click through and check out their full lists. Then come back and tell me which list/methodology you prefer, and why.

Biggest Baby Name Debuts of All Time: Girls, 30 to 21

biggest baby name debuts of all time, girl names, 30 to 21

And now for the third installment of the top baby name debuts for girls.

From 30 to 21:

Aideliz, Rosangelica & Unnamed, 3-way tie for #30

  • Aideliz debuted with 91 baby girls in 2008.
    Inspired by Aideliz Hidalgo, a contestant on the TV beauty pageant “Nuestra Belleza Latina 2008.”
  • Rosangelica debuted with 91 baby girls in 1993.
    Inspired by Rosangelica, a character on the telenovela “Rosangelica.”
  • Unnamed debuted with 91 baby girls in 1989.
    No inspiration; possibly related to the great baby name glitch of 1989.

Alliyah, #29

  • Alliyah debuted with 94 baby girls in 1994.
    Inspired by singer Aaliyah.

Greydis & Sharday, 2-way tie for #28

  • Greydis debuted with 100 baby girls in 2009.
    Inspired by Greydis Gil, winner of the TV beauty pageant “Nuestra Belleza Latina 2009.”
  • Sharday debuted with 100 baby girls in 1985.
    Inspired by singer Sade [shah-DAY].

Torey, #27

  • Torey debuted with 102 baby girls in 1959.
    Inspired by the TV sitcom “Peck’s Bad Girl.”

Tennille, #26

  • Tennille debuted with 103 baby girls in 1975.
    Inspired by the duo Captain & Tennille.

Izamar, #25

  • Izamar debuted with 107 baby girls in 1990.
    Inspired by Isamar Medina, a character on the telenovela “La Revancha.”

Kelis, #24

  • Kelis debuted with 108 baby girls in 2000.
    Inspired by singer Kelis.

Cotina, #23

  • Cotina debuted with 109 baby girls in 1972.
    Inspired by Katina, a character on the soap opera “Where the Heart Is.”

Jaleesa, #22

  • Jaleesa debuted with 116 baby girls in 1987.
    Inspired by Jaleesa Vinson, a character on the TV sitcom “A Different World.”

Turkessa, #21

  • Turkessa debuted with 119 baby girls in 1975.
    Inspired by Turkessa (b. 1975), baby of Supremes singer Mary Wilson.

The final two groups of ten are coming up tomorrow and Friday. Stay tuned!

*The Top 50 Baby Name Debuts for Girls: 50-41, 40-31, 30-21, 20-11, 10-1*

The Demise of the Baby Name Hillary

Hilary Parker’s recent post on the 14 most “poisoned” baby names reminded me that I haven’t yet written about the demise of the baby name Hillary. (Or Hilary. Or Chelsea.)

So let’s travel back to 1992 for a minute.

In mid-July, Arkansas Governor Bill Clinton was selected as the Democratic candidate for the presidency. His wife Hillary and daughter Chelsea were now in the national spotlight.

In early November, Bill managed to beat Republican incumbent George H. W. Bush to become the 42nd president of the United States. Hillary and Chelsea would now stay in the national spotlight.

And in late November, a few weeks after the election, the Miami Herald printed this:

Now that the Clinton women are set to move into the White House, both names are becoming more popular among new parents.

For the first time, Chelsea has cracked the top 10 list of the most popular girl names in Florida. Name expert Leonard R. N. Ashley, a Brooklyn College professor, said he expects Hillary to also catch on.

[…]

The popularity of Chelsea, on the rise long before the presidential pre-teen made her Democratic convention appearance, is likely to get a boost from the first family pedigree, Ashley said.

The “name expert” got it wrong, of course.

Hillary did not catch on. Nor did Chelsea. Both names had been on the rise, but usage dropped significantly after 1992.

Here are the spikes, both graphically and numerically:

The Baby Name Hillary

Baby Name Hillary - Drop in Popularity After 1992
The Baby Name Hillary
  • 1994: 408 baby girls named Hillary [rank: 566th]
  • 1993: 1,064 baby girls named Hillary [rank: 261st]
  • 1992: 2,522 baby girls named Hillary [rank: 132nd]
  • 1991: 1,789 baby girls named Hillary [rank: 166th]
  • 1990: 1,523 baby girls named Hillary [rank: 192nd]

That’s a 58% drop from 1992 to 1993. Hillary fell so low that it got pushed out of the top 1,000 entirely for two years (2002 and 2003).

The Baby Name Hilary

Baby Name Hilary - Drop in Popularity After 1992
The Baby Name Hilary
  • 1994: 145 baby girls named Hilary [rank: 1,208th]
  • 1993: 343 baby girls named Hilary [rank: 651st]
  • 1992: 1,171 baby girls named Hilary [rank: 233rd]
  • 1991: 1,148 baby girls named Hilary [rank: 243rd]
  • 1990: 1,216 baby girls named Hilary [rank: 232nd]

A 71% drop from 1992 to 1993. Hilary was out of the top 1,000 by 1994 and hasn’t been back since. (Hilary Parker says the name Hilary is “clearly the most poisoned.”)

The Baby Name Chelsea

Baby Name Chelsea - Drop in Popularity After 1992
The Baby Name Chelsea
  • 1994: 7,713 baby girls named Chelsea [rank: 38th]
  • 1993: 11,288 baby girls named Chelsea [rank: 25th]
  • 1992: 16,176 baby girls named Chelsea [rank: 15th]
  • 1991: 13,508 baby girls named Chelsea [rank: 18th]
  • 1990: 12,782 baby girls named Chelsea [rank: 24th]

The drop here isn’t as dramatic — just 30% — but Chelsea was out of the top 100 by 1999. It currently ranks 222nd.

Why?

Why did the name Hillary slip after Hillary Clinton became a fixture in the White House?

Because she violated gender norms — that’s my guess.

Hillary Clinton, 1992

Hillary Clinton was a new kind of First Lady. She was a lawyer, a businesswoman, a scholar and an activist. She was the first First Lady with an earned (vs. honorary) post-graduate degree, and the first to have her own professional career.

But, instead of being praised for her intelligence and ambition, she was criticized for it.

Just two months after the inauguration, Anna Quindlen of the New York Times made note of the double standard:

Maybe some of our daughters took notice of how Hillary Clinton was seen as abrasive, power-hungry and unfeminine when to some of us she seemed merely smart, outspoken and hard-working. Maybe they saw the masquerade and recognized intuitively the age-old message about how much more attractive women are when they are domestic, soft, contented, the message aimed over the years at Susan B. Anthony, Margaret Sanger, Eleanor Roosevelt and many, many others.

To expectant parents, it didn’t matter that Hillary Clinton was smart and successful. They began avoiding the name Hillary in 1993 because the First Lady — the most high-profile Hillary in the nation — was making her name seem “unfeminine.”

Do you agree? Disagree?

P.S. What are the 13 other “poisoned” names? The 9 to drop since the 1960s are Ashanti, Catina, Deneen, Farrah, Iesha, Infant, Katina, Khadijah and Renata. The other four — Celestine, Clementine, Dewey and Minna — are from the 1800s, a time when SSA data wasn’t too reliable.

Sources: