How popular is the baby name Katinka in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Katinka.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Katinka


Posts that Mention the Name Katinka

Rare Girl Names from Early Cinema: Letter K

karanina, k-names, cinema, girl names

Looking for an uncommon K-name for your baby girl? Here’s the next installment of rare female names collected from very old films (released from the 1910s to the 1940s). For those names that saw enough usage to register in the national data set, I’ve included links to the popularity graphs.

Kabirah
Kabirah was a character played by actress Emily Seville in the film Kismet (1920).

Kalaniweo
Kalaniweo was a character played by actress Enid Markey in the film Aloha Oe (1915).

Kalora
Kalora was a character played by actress Ruth Stonehouse in the film The Slim Princess (1915) and by actress Mabel Normand in the remake The Slim Princess (1920).

Kaluna
Kaluna was a character played by actress Betty Schade in the short film Isle of Abandoned Hope (1914).

Kamamamalua
Kamamamalua was a character played by actress Hilo Hattie in the film Miss Tatlock’s Millions (1948).

Kameela
Kameela was a character played by actress Ann Rork in the film The Notorious Lady (1927)

Karamaneh
Karamaneh was a character played by either of two actresses, Joan Clarkson and Dorinea Shirley, in various short films, including The Shrine of the Seven Lamps and The Cafe L’Egypte, during the 1920s.

Karanina
Karanina “Nina” Novak was a character played by actress Anne Shirley in the film Four Jacks and a Jill (1942).

Karin
Karin Touzac was a character played by actress Merle Oberon in the film This Love of Ours (1945).

  • Usage of the baby name Karin.

Karsha
Karsha was a character played by actress Florence Bates in the film Kismet (1944).

  • Usage of the baby name Karsha.

Katha
Katha was a character played by actress Helen Twelvetrees in the film All Men Are Enemies (1934).

  • Usage of the baby name Katha.

Kathe
Kathe was a character played by actress Dorothy Tree in the film Sky Murder (1940).

  • Usage of the baby name Kathe (which debuted in the data the year Sky Murder came out).

Kathlyn
Kathlyn Williams was an actress who appeared in films from the 1900s to the 1930s. She was born in Montana in 1879. Her birth name was Kathleen Mabel Williams. Kathlyn was also a character played by actress Bessie Eyton in the film The City of Purple Dreams (1918).

Katina
Katina Paxinou was an actress who appeared in films from the 1940s to the 1970s. She was born in Greece in 1900. Her birth name was Ekaterini Konstantopoulou. Katina was also a character played by actress Sonja Henie in the film Iceland (1942).

  • Usage of the baby name Katina.

Katinka
Katinka was a character name in multiple films, including The Seven Sisters (1915) and The Seventh Day (1922).

Katrin
Katrin was a character name in multiple films, including The Farmer’s Daughter (1947) and I Remember Mama (1948).

  • Usage of the baby name Katrin.

Katrine
Katrine Van Ryn was a character played by actress Connie Marshall in the film Dragonwyck (1946).

Katuma
Katuma was a character played by actress Tsuru Aoki in the short film A Relic of Old Japan (1914).

Katyusha
Katyusha Maslova was a character played by various actresses (such as Florence Lawrence, Pauline Frederick, Dolores del Rio, Lupe Velez) in various movies called Resurrection, all based on the novel of the same name by Leo Tolstoy.

Kawista
Kawista was a character played by actress Edith Storey in the short film Return of Ta-Wa-Wa (1910).

Kay
Kay Laurel was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in Pennsylvania in 1890. Her birth name was Ruth Leslie. Kay Aldridge was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1940s. Aldridge was born in Florida in 1917. Kay was also a character name in multiple films, including The Scarlet Honeymoon (1925) and Mrs. Miniver (1942).

  • Usage of the baby name Kay.

Kazia
Kazia was a character played by actress Madlaine Traverse in the film Fruits of Desire (1916).

  • Usage of the baby name Kazia.

Kealani
Kealani was a character name in multiple films, including The Sea Flower (1918) and Isle of Lost Men (1928).

Kedzie
Kedzie Thropp was a character played by actress Wanda Hawley in the film We Can’t Have Everything (1918).

  • Usage of the baby name Kedzie.

Keema
Keema was a character played by actress Gloria Roy in the film Mr. Moto Takes a Chance (1938)

  • Usage of the baby name Keema.

Kee-on-ee
Kee-on-ee was a character played by two actresses, Marie Walcamp and Lule Warrenton, in the short film The Werewolf (1913), which is considered the first-ever werewolf film.

Kelcey
Kelcey Dale was a character played by actress Carmel Myers in the film The Understanding Heart (1927).

  • Usage of the baby name Kelcey.

Kentucky
Kentucky was a character played by actress Anita Page in the film Our Modern Maidens (1929).

Keok
Keok was a character played by actress Anna May Wong in the film The Alaskan (1924).

Ketty
Ketty Galanta was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s. Her birth name was Ekaterina De Galantha.

  • Usage of the baby name Ketty.

Kettisha
Kettisha was a character played by actress Doris Lloyd in film Phantom Lady (1944)

Kichimatsu
Kichimatsu was a character played by actress Clara Kimball Young in the short film Jack’s Chrysanthemum (1913).

Kiki
Kiki was a character name in multiple films, including Kiki (1931) and The Dude Goes West (1948).

  • Usage of the baby name Kiki.

Kiliki
Kiliki was a character played by actress Maida Vale in the film Vengeance of the Deep (1923).

Kissmoia
Kissmoia was a character played by actress Tsuru Aoki in the short films A Tragedy of the Orient (1914) and The Curse of Caste (1914).

Kit
Kit Lamson was a character played by actress Maxine Elliott Hicks in the film East Side – West Side (1923).

  • Usage of the baby name Kit.

Kittens
Kittens Reichert was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in New York in 1910. Her birth name was Catherine Alma Reichert. Kittens was also a character played by actress Dorothy Abril in the film Rouge and Riches (1920).

Kittie
Kittie Swasher was a character played by actress Madge Kennedy in the film The Girl with the Jazz Heart (1921).

  • Usage of the baby name Kittie.

Kitty
Kitty Gordon was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s. She was born in England in 1878. Her birth name was Constance Blades. Kitty was also a character name in multiple films, including Five Star Final (1931) and The Challenge (1948).

  • Usage of the baby name Kitty.

Klari
Klari was a character played by actress Lynn Bari in the film The Baroness and the Butler (1938).

Kleopatra
Kleopatra “Kleo” Johnson was a character played by actress Etta McDaniel in the film Life with Henry (1940).

Klondike
Klondike was a character played by actress Thelma Todd in the film Klondike (1932).

Klyda
Klyda was a character played by actress Ormi Hawley in the short film A Thief in the Night (1915).

  • Usage of the baby name Klyda.

Knudka
Knudka was a character played by actress Nina Campana in the film Call of the Yukon (1938).

Konia
Konia Markham was a character played by actress Betty Compson in the film The White Flower (1923).

Korah
Korah Harley was a character played by actress Elissa Landi in the film Knowing Men (1930).

  • Usage of the baby name Korah.

Kostina
Kostina was a character played by actress Margaret Gibson in the short film When the Gods Forgive (1914).

Kuulei
Kuulei De Clercq was an actress who appeared in two films in 1937. She was born in Hawaii in 1927. Her sister was Nalani.

  • Usage of the baby name Kuulei.

Kye
Kye Allen was a character played by actress Constance Bennett in the film Sin Town (1942).

  • Usage of the baby name Kye.

…Which of the above names do you like best?

Source: IMDb

Baby Name Battle – 7 Hungarian Girl Names

Katinka, Sari, Ella, Mici, Terka, Liza and Klara were the names of the seven sisters in the lost silent film The Seven Sisters (1915), which was based on a Hungarian play.

The Seven Sisters (1915)
Scene from The Seven Sisters (1915).

A 1916 advertisement for the movie, which was a vehicle for silent film actress Marguerite Clark, offered the following summary:

The story is as simple and as sweet and dainty as Little Marguerite herself. She is the fourth of a family of seven sisters. Under an old Hungarian marriage law she must not marry until the elder sisters have gone off. How she and her lover clear the way with the aid of that young man’s marriageable friends affords scope for some delightful comedy amid the quaintest and most beautiful old-world surroundings ever portrayed.

The names Katinka, Sari, Ella, Mici, Terka, Liza and Klara are Hungarian versions (or diminutives of Hungarian versions) of the names Katherine, Sarah, Eleanor (or some other El- or -ella name), Mitzi, Theresa, Elizabeth and Clara.

And now for today’s question…

Which Hungarian girl name do you like best?

View Results

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Sources:

  • Bacon, George Vaux. “Seven Sisters.” Photoplay Magazine Sept. 1915: 112-120.
  • Advertisements.” New Zealand Herald 21 Aug. 1916: 12.

Fighting for a Romansh Name in Switzerland

We’ve talked about parents fighting to use Berber baby names in Morocco, and parents fighting to use Breton baby names in France.

Now let’s talk about a Romansh family that made headlines for fighting to register a Romansh baby name in Switzerland.

But first, some background.

Switzerland has four national languages: German, French, Italian and Romansh. Romansh is spoken in mountainous eastern Switzerland and is “the direct descendant of the Latin that was spoken in these mountain valleys at the height of the Roman empire, and shares the same Latin roots as French, Italian or Spanish.” It was the last of the four languages to be officially recognized, in 1938.

Right around the time Romansh became an official language, a Romansh carpenter by the name of John Truoz-Saluz — who’d moved westward with his family to the German-speaking city of Solothurn — welcomed a baby girl.

The baby was named Tina.

John tried to register Tina’s name with the government, but the name was rejected.

The clerk at the Solothurn registry office couldn’t find Tina in the German-language Duden, and, according to Solothurn cantonal law, “nobody could legally bear a given name which was not listed in the Duden.” So the name couldn’t be accepted. (The clerk then suggested Tinka, a diminutive of Katinka, as an alternative to Tina.)

John appealed to the municipal council, to the cantonal supreme court, and ultimately to the Swiss supreme court in Bern.

It took a year and a half of battling the government, but finally, in 1940, the federal court overruled the lower courts by deciding that “an original citizen of one canton had the right to name his children, despite the laws of his adopted canton.”

Sources: