How popular is the baby name Kitty in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Kitty and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Kitty.

The graph will take a few seconds to load, thanks for your patience. (Don't worry, it shouldn't take nine months.) If it's taking too long, try reloading the page.


Popularity of the Baby Name Kitty

Number of Babies Named Kitty

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Kitty

Name Quotes for the Weekend #36

Pronunciation of Baden-Powell

Verse written by Robert Baden-Powell, 1st Baron Baden-Powell (1857-1941), founder of the Scout Movement:

Pronunciation of Baden-Powell

Man, Nation, Maiden
Please call it Baden.
Further, for Powell
Rhyme it with Noel.

From Otter, Apple, CrimeFighter: celebrities should save stupid baby names for their sons by Eleanor Margolis:

When parents inflict a sickeningly cutesy name on a daughter they’re (unwittingly, I hope) defining her by her cuteness — something that a massive chunk of society was going to do even before they gave her a name that would look stupid on a Bichon Frisé. Either they’re blind to the fact that women have a hard enough time being taken seriously without being called Marshmallow Twinkletits, or they don’t plan on taking their daughter seriously themselves.

So, if idiot parents feel a biological imperative to name their children after “aDORKable” things, I think they should go for it. My one caveat is that they bestow these names on their sons rather than their daughters. Because naming a boy “Otter” may not be revolutionary, but it would definitely take one white, middle-class man down a notch.

From Is Bernie right name for president? by Bernie O’Neill:

Kennedy was the first Catholic president. Obama the first black president. Hillary would be the first woman president.

But more importantly, Sanders would be the first Bernie president. I like the sound of that.

From Intact, Packed Etruscan Tomb Found by Rossella Lorenzi:

So far [archaeologist Clarita] Natalini and colleagues have been able to read the word “Laris.” Lars is a common Etruscan male first name. The stone coffin contains the skeleton of a male individual.

From an article about the US Navy’s most futuristic ship, the USS Zumwalt, which is captained by a guy named James Kirk:

“We are absolutely fired up to see Zumwalt get underway. For the crew and all those involved in designing, building, and readying this fantastic ship, this is a huge milestone,” the ship’s skipper, Navy Capt. James Kirk, said before the ship departed.

(The original captain of Star Trek‘s very futuristic starship Enterprise was named James T. Kirk.)

From What’s in a Name? by Jamaal Allan (who is white, but often assumed to be black):

When people have seen my name before they’ve seen my face, I get “OH — you’re Jamaal.”

[…]

It is not uncommon for people to follow up with, “I expected you to be–” and then there’s a pause; a sudden realization they are on the verge of sounding racist. There’s a look–not quite ‘deer in the headlights’, but it is a definite freeze. What to say next? I’ve heard several: taller, older, different (usually accompanied with an uncomfortable chuckle).

Very few people have the courage to say darker.

(Found via NPR.)

From the book Suffolk Surnames (1858) by Nathaniel Ingersoll Bowditch:

The following anecdote was related to me by a friend: At a trial, in which a well-known Liverpool merchant, Ottiwell Wood, was a witness, he was requested by the presiding judge, who was somewhat deaf, to spell his name; which he did as follows: “O double t,
i double u, e double l, double u double o, d.”

From the book From Red Hot to Monkey’s Eyebrow: Unusual Kentucky Place Names (1997) by Robert M. Rennick:

Kentucky’s Mousie, still a post office serving many families in the Jones Fork area of northern Knott County, wasn’t named for a mouse at all but for a young woman — named Mousie. She was then (1916) the twenty-year-old daughter of Clay Martin, a large landowner in that area.

Why would a girl be named Mousie? Why not? Mousie is not at all an unusual given name in eastern Kentucky. Since the Civil War, scores of young Mousies throughout the region have borne this name. Mousie Martin, who later became Mrs. Mart Gibson, used to tell us that she was so named at the suggestion of her grandfather, for she had an older sister named Kitty and he rather liked the idea of having two little varmints in the family.

Want more quote posts?


Short List of Odd Names – Barefoot, Truefoot, Daft

In mid-2014, K. Steenson of the University of Nottingham’s Manuscripts and Special Collections blog offered “fifteen genuine examples of people’s names taken from the manuscripts that we have come across.”

The original list included a lot of fun details, but here’s the gist of it — just the names themselves:

  • Barefoot Booth
  • Daft Smith
  • Dymock Wallpoole
  • Hearsay Wood
  • Kitty Bounds
  • Madewell Crisp
  • Marmaduke Witham
  • Mercy Puffin
  • Original Steele
  • Restored Bendall
  • Saintly Whitehead
  • Stockdale Avison
  • Thoroton Pocklington
  • Treverse Spilie
  • Webster Whistler

In the comments, an archivist from Somerset threw in a few more: Strangeways and Truefoot (brothers), Purified, and Keren-happuch.

Two foot-names in a single post! Exciting. Here are some foot-names from earlier posts: Dingle Foot, Dirty foot, and Shoots her foot.

Source: What’s in a name? (found via e-Onomastics)

Popular Baby Names in England and Wales, 2014

According to data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS), the most popular baby names in England and Wales last year were Amelia and Oliver.

Here are the top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2014:

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Amelia, 5,327 baby girls
2. Olivia, 4,724
3. Isla, 4,012
4. Emily, 3,991
5. Poppy, 3,273
6. Ava, 3,171
7. Isabella, 3,022
8. Jessica, 2,995
9. Lily, 2,965
10. Sophie, 2,905
1. Oliver, 6,649 baby boys
2. Jack, 5,804
3. Harry, 5,379
4. Jacob, 5,050
5. Charlie, 4,642
6. Thomas, 4,405
7. George, 4,320
8. Oscar, 4,269
9. James, 4,167
10. William, 4,134

In the girls’ top 10, Lily replaces Mia (now 13th). The boys’ top 10 includes the same names in a different order.

The ONS report also highlighted a few seasonal favorites, such as…

  • Holly, which ranked 5th in December but 70th in June. Overall, it was 39th.
  • Summer, which ranked 25th in June but 105th in December. Overall, it was 58th.

Here are some of last year’s rare baby names, each given to either 3, 4 or 5 babies:

Rare Girl Names Rare Boy Names
Ambreen, Angharad, Arinola, Arzoo, Astala, Boux, Cagla, Cliodhna, Darasimi, Delyth, Dolsie, Elliw, Eslem, Flourish, Harper-Lee, Heulwen, Heyabel, Honeysuckle, Ilinca, Io, Iris-Rose, Jedidiah, Kitty-Rose, Lili-Haf, Loveday, Luul, L’Wren, Makatendeka, Maxima, Moksha, Morsal, Nainsi, Peach, Poppy-Willow, Ritaj, Sailor, Shailene, Tavleen, Topsy, Tuppence, Uxia, Vaneeza, Venba, Zennor, Ziggy Aldion, Alias, Archimedes, Bevon, Boycie, Bright, Buzz, Caelum, Calix, Cloud, Coast, Cove, Crispin, Denley, Diesel, Dipson, Grantas, Gwern, Hanzala, Harrington, Jensen-James, Jolyon, Jonjoe, Jorel, Kebba, Keita, Khattab, Klaidas, Marceau, Metodi, Oaklen, Osazee, Peregrine, Refoel, Re’Kai, Romarni, Sanchez, Seweryn, Sheriff, Stanleigh, Swayley, Timurs, Ugnius, Vasco, Velizar, Ynyr

Finally, here are all of my previous posts on baby names in England and Wales: 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009 and 2008.

Source: Baby Names, England and Wales, 2014 – ONS

Gaiety Girl Names – Ellaline, Florence, Moya

Gaiety Girl Camille Clifford
Camille Clifford
Before there were Follies girls, there were Gaiety Girls.

These were showgirls appearing in Edwardian musical comedies at London’s Gaiety Theatre during the 1890s.

There’s no definitive list of all the Gaiety Girls, but here are a few of them:

  • Alice Delysia
  • Billie Carleton – birth name Florence
  • Blanche Massey
  • Camille Clifford – birth name Camilla
  • Cicely Courtneidge – birth name Esmerelda
  • Connie Gilchrist – birth name Constance
  • Constance Collier – birth name Laura
  • Denise Orme – birth name Jessie
  • Dorothy Minto
  • Eleanor Souray
  • Ellaline Terriss – birth name Mary (Ellaline was her middle name)
  • Evelyn Laye – birth name Elsie
  • Florence Smithson
  • Gaby Deslys – birth name Marie-Elise-Gabrielle
  • Gabrielle Ray
  • Gertie Millar – birth name Gertrude
  • Gina Palerme
  • Gladys Cooper
  • Irene: Irene Desmond, Irene Richards
  • Jessie Matthews
  • Jose Collins – birth name Charlotte
  • Kitty Gordon – birth name Constance
  • Lily Elsie – birth name Elsie
  • Mabel: Mabel Love, Mabel Russell
  • Mamie Watson
  • Marie Studholme – birth name Caroline
  • May: May Etheridge, May Gates
  • Moya Nugent
  • Olive May
  • Phyllis Dare
  • Rosie Boote – birth name Rose
  • Sylvia: Sylvia Grey, Sylvia Lillian Storey
  • Zena Dare – birth name Florence

Which of the above names do you like best?

Sources: Gaiety Girls – Wikipedia, Gaiety Girls exhibition – National Portrait Gallery
Image: Camille Clifford – National Portrait Gallery

Name Quotes for the Weekend #26

halle berry quote about her name

From a short item about Halle Berry in a 1995 issue of Jet:

“My mother was shopping in Halle Brothers in Cleveland,” she recently revealed in the New York Daily News. “She saw the bags and thought, ‘That’s what I’m going to name my child.’ I thought it was the coolest name until I got into this business. No one ever says it right, it’s Halle, like Sally.”

From the NOVA video Zeppelin Terror Attack:

On the day that came to be known as “Zep Sunday,” tens of thousands of relieved Londoners picked over the wreckage for souvenirs.

Overnight, pilot William Leefe Robinson became the most famous man in Britain. Babies, flowers and hats were named after him and he was mobbed wherever he went.

Within a month, the technique he perfected for taking out airships had brought down two more. It was the beginning of the end for the zeppelin.

On September 2, 1916, 21-year-old William Leefe Robinson became the first pilot to shoot down a German Zeppelin over Britain. (Several weeks later, a shot-down Zeppelin inspired a British family to name their newborn Zeppelina.)

From an interview with psychologist and baby name writer Albert Mehrabian:

Looking at the psychological health of subjects using my temperament scales and comparing that with the impression given by their names, I found a correlation showing that individuals with less pleasant names exhibited greater psychopathology. It’s a very weak association, but if I were a parent choosing a name for my child, I wouldn’t take a chance at making that association.

From Under the Spell of a Name by Mikita Brottman in the New York Times (found via Appellation Mountain):

I also know a desperately lonely guy who refused to go on a blind date with a woman he met online (who, he had to admit, seemed an uncannily perfect match) because of her name: Bunny.

“If you like her enough, you’ll get over it,” I told him. “You could call her B.”

“I can’t do it,” he said. “I just can’t imagine my name linked with that of someone named Bunny.”

From a funny post about choosing baby names by Robbie Knox (who has a daughter named Kitty):

[A name should not] be the name of a kids’ TV character. This is where we went wrong. If you pick a name similar to a cartoon that has extensive merchandising contracts, people buy you a lot of stuff. We have more Hello Kitty products in our house than the entire teenage population of Japan put together. We’ll be more careful next time when our son Pikachu is born.

From In Our View: Baby names in Utah newspaper The Spectrum:

Hardcore fans of the 1970’s TV show M*A*S*H* will remember the episode when Major Charles Emerson Winchester (the Third) received a letter from his younger sister. The corpsman, who delivered the letter, referenced her as Hon-o-ree-a to which Winchester pompously responded … “It’s Aun-or-ee-a!” No doubt those high-brow Massachusetts Winchesters had all the best intentions when they named the Major’s little sister, but giving a child a name which must be spelled or repeated several times before new acquaintances “get it” is so unfair. There are lots of reasons kids get bullied, but his or her name — or some derivative of it — should not be a cause for learning self-defense.

Want to see more random quotes about names? Check out the name quotes category.

26 Girl Names from 1916

In early 1916, Photoplay Magazine came up with a list of potential titles for serial films using the formula established by The Perils of Pauline (1914), The Exploits of Elaine (1914), and The Hazards of Helen (1914).

Not-Yet Serials, Photoplay Magazine, January 1916

(Just a few months after the above was published, The Mysteries of Myra came out.)

Which of those 26 names — Abigail, Bertha, Calpurnia, Delilah, Evangeline, Florence, Garnet, Hazel, Imogene, Jezebel, Kitty, Lizzie, Margaret, Nancy, Orillia, Priscilla, Queenie, Roberta, Sibyl, Theodosia, Ursula, Victoria, Winifred, Xanthippe, Yetta or Zira — do you like best?

And, which of those serials would you be most likely to watch? :)

Starlet Names from the Early 1900s

Ever heard of the WAMPAS Baby Stars?

They were young actresses on the cusp of movie stardom back in the 1920s and 1930s.

WAMPAS baby stars 1928

About 13 Baby Stars were selected by the Western Association of Motion Picture Advertisers every year from 1922 to 1934 (minus 1930 and 1933).

Some of those young women did indeed achieve stardom. Among the Baby Stars were Clara Bow (’24), Mary Astor (’26), Joan Crawford (’26), Fay Wray (’26) and Ginger Rogers (’32).

I thought the names of the Baby Stars — the oldest of whom were born in the final years of the 1800s, the youngest of whom were born in the mid-1910s — would make an interesting set. But I wanted birth names, not stage names, so I tracked down as many birth names as I could. Here’s the result, sorted by frequency (i.e., seven women were named Dorothy).

  • 7: Dorothy
  • 6: Helen
  • 4: Elizabeth
  • 3: Frances, Ruth, Virginia
  • 2: Anita, Ann, Barbara, Betty, Clara, Doris, Dorothea, Eleanor, Evelyn, Gladys, Gwendolyn, Hazel, Jacqueline, Katherine, Laura, Louise, Lucille, Margaret, Maria, Marian, Marie, Marion, Mary, Patricia, Violet
  • 1: Adamae, Alberta, Alma, Anne, Audrey, Augusta, Blanche, Carmelita, Caryl, Constance, Derelys, Dolores, Duane, Edna, Eleanor, Ena, Enriqueta, Ethel, Ethlyne, Evalyn, Flora, Gisela, Gloria, Gretchen, Hattie, Helene, Ina, Ingeborg, Jacquiline, Jean, Joan, Jobyna, Josephine, Juanita, Julanne, Kathleen, Kathryn, Kitty, Launa, Laurette, Lena, Lenore, Lilian, Lola, Lu Ann, Lucile, Madeline, Marceline, Martha, Mildred, Myrna, Natalia, Natalie, Nellie, Neoma, Olive, Olivia, Patsy, Rita, Rochelle, Rose, Sally, Suzanne, Sidney, Toshia, Vera, Vina

And here are the leftover stage names:

  • 5: Sally
  • 4: Mary
  • 3: Joan, June
  • 2: Betty, Jean, Judith, Pauline
  • 1: Alice, Bessie, Boots, Claire, Colleen, Dolores, Dorothy, Elinor, Evelyn, Fay, Frances, Gigi, Ginger, Gladys, Gloria, Gwen, Iris, Janet, Joyce, Julie, Karen, Kathleen, Lila, Lina, Lois, Lona, Loretta, Lucille, Lupe, Marian, Molly, Mona, Natalie, Patricia, Sue

(Often stage names were the real-life middle names of these women.)

Finally, a few interesting details:

  • Jobyna is Jobyna Ralston, named for actress Jobyna Howland, daughter of a man named Joby Howland. Jobyna debuted on the SSA’s baby name list in 1927.
  • Derelys is Derelys Perdue. “Perdue’s boss, future presidential father Joseph P. Kennedy, insisted on changing her name to the more palatable Ann Perdue.” She sued, but lost, and her career never recovered. Derelys was a one-hit wonder on the SSA’s baby name list in 1924.
  • Sidney is Sidney Fox, a female who had the name Sidney/Sydney long before the name became trendy for girls.
  • Lina is Lina Basquette, who I mentioned in last week’s name quote post.
  • One of the Marys is Mary Astor, who went on to give her daughter a Hawaiian name.

Which of the above names do you like best? Why?

Source: Derelys Perdue – Biography – Movies & TV – NYTimes.com