How popular is the baby name Klara in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Klara and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Klara.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Klara

Number of Babies Named Klara

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Klara

Baby Name Battle – 7 Hungarian Girl Names

Katinka, Sari, Ella, Mici, Terka, Liza and Klara were the names of the seven sisters in the lost silent film The Seven Sisters (1915), which was based on a Hungarian play.

The Seven Sisters (1915)
Scene from The Seven Sisters (1915).

A 1916 advertisement for the movie, which was a vehicle for silent film actress Marguerite Clark, offered the following summary:

The story is as simple and as sweet and dainty as Little Marguerite herself. She is the fourth of a family of seven sisters. Under an old Hungarian marriage law she must not marry until the elder sisters have gone off. How she and her lover clear the way with the aid of that young man’s marriageable friends affords scope for some delightful comedy amid the quaintest and most beautiful old-world surroundings ever portrayed.

The names Katinka, Sari, Ella, Mici, Terka, Liza and Klara are Hungarian versions (or diminutives of Hungarian versions) of the names Katherine, Sarah, Eleanor (or some other El- or -ella name), Mitzi, Theresa, Elizabeth and Clara.

And now for today’s question…

Which Hungarian girl name do you like best?

View Results

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Sources:

  • Bacon, George Vaux. “Seven Sisters.” Photoplay Magazine Sept. 1915: 112-120.
  • Advertisements.” New Zealand Herald 21 Aug. 1916: 12.

Most Popular Baby Names in Sweden, 2012

The most popular baby names in Sweden were announced a couple of days ago.

According to Statistics Sweden, the country’s top names are William for boys and Alice for girls.

Here are the top 20 girl names and top 20 boy names of 2012:

Baby Girl Names Baby Boy Names
1. Alice
2. Elsa
3. Julia
4. Ella
5. Maja
6. Ebba
7. Emma
8. Linnea
9. Molly
10. Alva
11. Wilma
12. Agnes
13. Klara [tie]
13. Nellie [tie]
15. Isabelle
16. Olivia
17. Alicia
18. Ellen
19. Lily
20. Stella
1. William
2. Oscar
3. Lucas
4. Hugo
5. Elias
6. Alexander
7. Liam
8. Charlie
9. Oliver
10. Filip
11. Leo
12. Viktor
13. Vincent
14. Emil
15. Axel
16. Anton
17. Erik
18. Olle
19. Theo
20. Ludvig

Did you know that, back in 1888, Ebba was the top newbie baby name in the US?

But let’s get back to Sweden.

Which Swedish names saw the biggest popularity boosts from 2011 to 2012?

Going up:

Rising Girl Names Rising Boy Names
1. Sigrid
2. Majken
3. Elise
4. Alicia
5. Lykke
6. Ronja
7. Juni
8. Svea
9. Siri [tie]
9. Melissa [tie]
1. Ebbe
2. Henry
3. Elvin
4. Charlie
5. Julian
6. Valter [tie]
6. Matteo [tie]
8. Elton
9. Edward
10. Mohamed

And which names decreased the most in popularity?

Going down:

Falling Girl Names Falling Boy Names
1. Minna
2. Tove
3. Elin
4. Evelina
5. Thea
6. Tindra
7. Filippa
8. Linnea
9. Tilde
10. Amanda
1. Ville
2. Linus
3. Neo
4. Rasmus
5. Carl
6. Jonathan
7. Simon
8. Viggo [tie]
8. Tim [tie]
10. Joel

Finally, here are the top baby names in Sweden from a couple of years ago.

Sources: Name Statistics – Statistics Sweden, William, Alice top Swedish baby names

Baby Name Needed – How Do You Pronounce Ove?

A reader from Sweden is expecting a baby. If the baby’s a boy, she’s thinking of naming him Ove. Here’s what she’d like to know:

I want the name to be internationally viable and wonder how an American would pronounce it. Does it look strange to you or is it common?

[Before reading on: Please leave a comment with the way you pronounced Ove when you read it in the title of this post. Thanks!]

Ove is a very rare name in the States. I’ve never met anyone here with the name, and I’d imagine most other Americans are also unfamiliar with it.

My first instinct was to pronounce it OH-vay, with a long o (as in old) and a long a (as in day) — almost like a Spanish olé, but with the stresses swapped. I also think OHV (rhyming with stove) would come to mind for a lot of Americans, as we’re accustomed to silent e endings.

According to the Swedish pronunciation I found online, though, neither guess is correct. Ove is more like OH-veh. I don’t know how many Americans would get that right on the first try. (Then again, maybe I’m underestimating our ability to pronounce Swedish names…?)

This reader is also looking for a few name suggestions:

If you have suggestions for names that work in both Swedish and English, feel free to help!

Many of the top girl names and boy names in Sweden right now are also popular in the U.S., and elsewhere. I think these would be great options. Some examples:

Adam
Erik
Kevin
Leo
Lucas
Max
Viktor
Ella
Ellen
Emma
Hanna
Klara
Lilly
Sara

I’ve also written a few posts (here, here, here) about Swedish names that work well in English. These might be helpful as well.

Do you have any other name suggestions?

Baby Name Needed – Girl Name that’s Irish or Swedish

A reader named Alexis wrote to me a few weeks ago:

My husband and I are expecting a baby girl in February 2009. He is Irish and I am Swedish so we are trying to find a simple girl’s name that is either Irish or Swedish. If you could help us it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks :)

About a month ago I listed a few simple Swedish names, such as Elin, Inga and Lina. Simple Irish names are a bit harder to come by (Deirbhile? Muirgheal?) but there’s always Fiona, Nola, Oona or Orla.

Personally, I like both Molly and Nora.

Molly tends to be associated with Ireland–perhaps thanks to Molly Malone–and is currently popular in Sweden. (It ranks 30th in Sweden, 18th in N. Ireland and 23rd in Ireland.)

Nora has literary connections to both countries: it was the name of James Joyce’s wife and of a character in Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House. (It ranks 36th in Sweden, but doesn’t rank in Ireland.)

Many other simple names, though not specifically Irish or Swedish, are popular in both areas as well:

  • Anna (#10 in N. Ireland, #20 in Ireland, #56 in Sweden)
  • Clara/Klara (#13 in Sweden, #84 in Ireland, #74 in N. Ireland)
  • Ella (#3 in Sweden, #3 in Ireland, #22 in N. Ireland)
  • Emma (#2 in Ireland, #4 in Sweden, #5 in N. Ireland)
  • Hanna/Hannah (#9 in N. Ireland, #13 in Ireland, #20 in Sweden)
  • Sara/Sarah (#1 in Ireland, #7 in N. Ireland, #26 in Sweden)

What other name suggestions would you offer Alexis?

Update, 4/18 – The baby is here! Check the 2nd comment to find out what her name is…

Baby Name Needed – English-friendly Swedish or Indian Name

A reader named Carin recently e-mailed me. She and her husband are expecting a baby in December, and they’d like help coming up with a name. Carin says:

We live in England, but I’m Swedish and my husband is of Indian background (born in England). We’d like to find a name that’s got Indian or Scandinavian background, but is still easy to pronounce in English. At the moment we’ve come up with Siri (Swedish) or Millie/Mili for a girl, and Alek or Sameer for boy. However, they don’t feel completely right! If you have any suggestions, I’d be very grateful!

I like that Carin and her husband are zeroing in on short, simple names. I think that makes a lot of sense in this case. Here are some similar suggestions:

Male Female
Emil
Erik
Henrik
Isak
Karl
Konrad
Kurt
Linus
Lukas
Oskar
Simon
Stellan
Viktor
Anand
Kamal
Kavi
Kumar
Mohan
Naveen
Nirav
Pranav
Rahul
Ravi
Rishi
Rohan
Saral
Anna
Emma
Elin
Sofia
Sara
Elina
Frida
Inga
Klara
Lina
Marta
Nora
Petra
Amala
Devi
Kala
Kamala
Leela
Mala
Maya
Mina
Mira
Neela
Priya
Seema
Tara

(For each gender, Swedish names are on the left and Indian names are on the right.)

What other names can you come up with?

Update, 6/03 – The baby girl is here! Check the comments to find out what her name is…