How popular is the baby name Klaus in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Klaus.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Klaus


Posts that Mention the Name Klaus

42 Swedes Change Their Names to “Klaus-Heidi”

Klaus-Heidi bike
“Property of: Klaus-Heidi”
Late last year, Lufthansa tried “to attract more Swedes to its flights” (and away from competitors’ flights) with a crazy marketing campaign.

What was so crazy about the campaign?

The name change contest.

The winner of the contest would get to live in Berlin for free for an entire year. He or she would get a flight to the city from Sweden, several more domestic flights within Germany (“so you can see all of your new homeland”), a fully furnished apartment, German language lessons, food vouchers, a bike, a Berlin WelcomeCard (for public transportation and entrance to museums), and more — all for free.

To enter the contest in the first place, though, this person would have to have changed his/her legal name to include the “very German” Klaus-Heidi.

Magnus Engvall, the Lufthansa marketing specialist running the competition, explains that it’s as if, translated for an American audience, Lufthansa was asking you to change your name to Jack-Barbara.

Proof of the name change, plus an essay, needed to be submitted to Lufthansa sometime between mid-October, when the contest began, and mid-November, when it ended.

Here’s the commercial Lufthansa used to introduce the “Are You Klaus-Heidi?” campaign:

Only a handful of entries were expected, but — thanks to Sweden’s notoriously liberal name-changing laws — dozens began pouring in. Lufthansa shut the contest down early, but not before 42 people entered, 9 on the very first day.

The 42 Swedes who changed their names to Klaus-Heidi ranged in age from 19 to 69. About 70% were male and 30% were female. Half were from Sweden’s capital city, Stockholm.

The winner of the contest, chosen because he’d creatively submitted a poem in place of an essay, was 24-year-old Michael Eric Klaus-Heidi Andersson (originally Michael Eric Andersson) from the village of Fjugesta. His “new life in Berlin” began in January of 2014.

The 41 other Klaus-Heidis didn’t walk away empty-handed, though. Each was awarded status in Lufthansa’s frequent flyer program and 60,000 free miles.

Now for the question of the day: If you were a Swede, would you have entered this contest?

Sources: The Atlantic, BusinessWeek, The Economist, The Local, Lufthansa

For-Profit Baby Names

Money for Baby NamesCalifornia mom-to-be Natasha Hill, the woman who was supposed to be getting $5,000 for allowing strangers to name her unborn baby via Belly Ballot, isn’t really pregnant.

She isn’t even really named “Natasha Hill.”

Her name is Natasha Lloyd, and she’s an actress who was hired by the website’s founder to help drum up publicity.

Yep–the whole thing was a hoax. The folks at Today.com were the ones to figure it out.

When TODAY Moms first reported on the contest, some readers were incredulous; they couldn’t believe a real mom would do such a thing. Now it appears they were right.

Except…they weren’t. Several “real moms” (and dads) have done this very thing. For-profit baby naming schemes are ridiculous, sure, but that doesn’t mean they’re not legit.

Here are all the for-profit baby names (and attempted for-profit baby names) I can think of:

*I never blogged about these three, so here are the details:

  • In 2001, Jason Black and Frances Schroeder of New York tried to auction off the name of the their third child (first son) via Yahoo and eBay. They were aiming for a corporate sponsor, so the bidding started at $500,000. No one bid. They ended up naming the baby Zane Black.
  • In 2002, Bob and Tracy Armstrong from Florida tried to auction off the name of their baby (gender unknown) via eBay. After eBay pulled the auction for the third time, they decided not to try again.
  • In 2002, Heather and Steve Johnston of Washington state tried to auction off the name of their baby boy via eBay. The bidding started at $250,000. I found no follow-up stories, so I imagine the auction was either pulled or unsuccessful.

Video games on one end, $15,000 on the other…such wildly different values placed on baby names. Kinda fascinating, isn’t it?

Sources: $5,000 online baby-name contest revealed as hoax, Mom crowdsources baby name for $5,000

P.S. More hoaxes here.

Namestorm #2 – Baby Names for Shoe Lovers

Love shoes as much as Imelda Marcos? If so, this post is for you.

Reader C in DC suggested last week that I brainstorm for names associated with shoes, and I thought that was a cool idea. So here’s my stab at it.

Luther
In 1938, American archaeologist Luther Cressman discovered a 10,000-year-old pair of sandals–the oldest pair of shoes ever found in North America (and maybe the world).

Louis and Nicolas
French shoemaker Nicolas Lestage designed elaborate high heeled shoes — the “Louis heel” — for Louis XIV around 1660.

Arthur
Anglo-Irish soldier/politician Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, created (with the help of his shoemaker) the Wellington boot in the early 1800s.

Charles

  • American inventor Charles Goodyear figured out how to vulcanize rubber in 1839. This discovery paved the way for the invention of sneakers.
  • Speaking of sneakers…Chuck Taylor All-Stars were named after American basketball player and shoe salesman Charles “Chuck” Taylor.

Mary Jane
Mary Janes got their name from the Buster Brown comic strip character Mary Jane in the early 1900s.

Salvatore and Judy (and Dorothy)
Italian shoemaker Salvatore Ferragamo created the ruby slippers worn by Judy Garland in the movie The Wizard of Oz (1939).

Klaus
German army doctor Klaus Märtens started making boots in the late 1940s.

Roger
French fashion designer Roger Vivier created his iconic Pilgrim pumps in the 1960s.

Chelsea
Chelsea boots were fashionable during the 1960s.

Nancy
Nancy Sinatra helped popularize go-go boots with her song “These Boots Are Made for Walkin'” (1966).

Christian
French footwear designer Christian Louboutin first introduced his red-lacquered soles in 1992.

And now, just like last time, two questions:

  • What other shoe-inspired names can you come up with?
  • What interests/activities should we namestorm about next?

Sources: History of Footwear, Wikipedia

Huge List of Anagram Baby Names

anagram baby names

Looking for baby names with something in common? Perhaps for a set of twins or triplets? I’ve collected hundreds of anagram baby names for you.

2-Letter Anagram Baby Names

3-Letter Anagram Baby Names

4-Letter Anagram Baby Names

5-Letter Anagram Baby Names

6-Letter Anagram Baby Names

7-Letter Anagram Baby Names

8-Letter Anagram Baby Names

9-Letter Anagram Baby Names

10-Letter Anagram Baby Names

If you like the idea of anagrams but want to avoid sound-alike sets, I recommend anagrams with different numbers of syllables. Pairs like “Etta and Tate” and “Clay and Lacy” are a far more subtle than pairs like “Enzo and Zeno” and “Mary and Myra.”

(Here are some palindromic names from last month.)