How popular is the baby name Kui in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Kui and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Kui.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Kui

Number of Babies Named Kui

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Kui

Name Quotes #57: Gage, Ciku, Abigail Fortitude

George Clooney explaining why he and his wife Amal named their twins Alexander and Ella (People):

“[We] didn’t want to give them one of those ridiculous Hollywood names that don’t mean anything,” George told Paris Match in an interview published Saturday. “They’ll already have enough difficulty bearing the weight of their celebrity.”

Summary of a recent study on the practice of naming winter storms (WBIR):

The researchers presented their subjects with three mock tweets about an upcoming winter storm — either using names like “Bill,” “Zelus,” or no name at all — then asked them about their perceptions of the storm’s potential severity.

It turned out that the survey participants were equally likely to show concern for the storm regardless of whether common names such as Bill were used, rather than uncommon names, such as Zelus. This was a surprise to Rainear, who thought that more “Americanized” names might make people more wary.

On the origin of the name of the Slinky (New York Times):

[N]ext month the Toy Manufacturers of America will induct Betty James, 82, the retired toy maker who gave the Slinky its name, into the Toy Industry Hall of Fame.

Mrs. James came up with the name after deciding that Slinky best described the sound of a metal spring expanding and collapsing. Slinky, of course, meaning sort of stealthily quiet. Mrs. James did not have sexy evening wear in mind; it was 1943, after all, and there was a war.

On changing name trends in Kenya (SDE Kenya):

It is so 1980 for modern Kenyan parents to name their children after biblical figures. Ati names like Grace, Hannah, Sarah, Magdalene or Jane for their daughters is now a no-no. For sons, naming them Abednego or Adonijah sounds like a bad Sunday school dream.

[…]

Names like Peter and Paul, Esther and Lois were fashionable in their grandparents’ time and today, girls are named Tasha, Tanya or Tiffany, while boys go by cooler ones like Cy, Kyle, Declan and Sherwin.

…The article also mentioned that many traditional names now have modernized forms:

  • Wangui -> Kui
  • Waithiageni -> Sheni
  • Wanjiku -> Ciku
  • Wanjiru -> Ciru
  • Wambui -> Foi
  • Wacera -> Cera

“Modern parents have no qualms having them appear like that in official documents. Welcome to baby names in 21st century Kenya.”

Onomastician Cleveland Kent Evans vs. the baby name Gage (Washington Post):

But right now, Evans is pondering the sudden, explosive rise of the male first name Gage. From out of nowhere. There’s no record of this name, nothing in the texts, nothing anywhere. And yet just in the last couple of years, it’s been popping up all around the country.

[…]

Finally, he asked his students at Bellevue College near Omaha. One student got the reference immediately: “Emergency!” he said. Meaning the short-lived 1970s TV series, of course. Turns out there was a character named John Gage on that show, and he was generally addressed as Gage.

[…]

Incredibly, “Emergency!,” which aired opposite “60 Minutes” for four years, was exceedingly popular among elementary-school children.

One mom’s positive experience with revealing her son’s name during pregnancy (Popsugar)

One reason why people don’t reveal the baby’s name is to ward off other people’s opinions. I could tell there were a couple of my friends who didn’t like the name, but just like I didn’t get pregnant to please them, I’m wasn’t going to change his name for them either. Most people that I talked to had enough common sense to keep their opinions to themselves. Even if they didn’t, it wouldn’t have changed a thing.

My son’s name […] is special to me. I didn’t stop feeling that way once I told it to people — if anything, it made the pregnancy a whole lot easier.

From the script for Mother Is a Freshman (1949), about a 35-year-old widow, Abigail, who starts attending the college that her daughter Susan goes to:

Abigail: I mean about the Abigail Fortitude Memorial Scholarship.
Susan: The one they give to any girl whose first two names are Abigail Fortitude?
Abigail: Yes.
Susan: Clara Fettle says no one’s applied for it since 1907, and there’s zillions piling up.
Abigail: And you never told me!
Susan: Of course not.
Abigail: It never occurred to you that my first names are Abigail Fortitude–that I’ve had to put up with them all my life!
Susan: I know, Mom. It must have been awful.
Abigail [struck by thought]: Maybe that’s why my mother gave me those names. Maybe she know about the scholarship.

…Turns out the scholarship had been set up by Abigail’s grandmother, also named Abigail Fortitude.

*

Want to see more quotes about names? Check out the name quotes category.


Phone Book Fishing on Molokai – Bootie, Grandharva, Iqbal, Wren

Here are some interesting names I found in the Molokai phone book, which consists of a mere 12 pages:

Ador
Ameron
Arizona
Arleone
Arvo
Aulii
Balbino
Bettygene
Bibiana
Bootie
Burrelle
Burridge
Carnation
Castle
Cheiko
Chiemi
Chikara
Constantino
Cookie
Dartagnon
Davidette
Dedric
Democrito
Dionisio
Eddiemar
Egmedio
Eladio
Estanislao
Ewart
Felicidad
Fiette
Filiga
Filumena
Flordeliza
Geneva
Grandharva
Hajime
Halia
Herminio
Hiroshi
HollyCleo
Honda
Honorato
Hoomalu
Ikaika
Ilika
Ililani
Iolani
Iqbal
Irenio
Irmalynn
Jeness
Jersula
Jimelo
Justiniano
Kachan
Kaelin
Kaeo
Kahala
Kahikina
Kaipo
Kakai
Kamakana
Kanaiaupuni
Kanani
Kapua
Kapuaola
Kauila
Kaulananapua****
Kazumi
Kealoha
Kelson
Kinisimere
Kiva
Kraig
Kui
Kulani
Lahela
Lavarius
Lega
Leimomi
Mahiki
Maka
Makaahoa
Makia
Maleka
Malu
Manuai
Manono
Maunaloa
Mauntrese
Mapuana
Maunalani
Meilin
Mele
Melecio
Melorine
Mercury
Mihana
Mihpel
Minka
Moana
Monteflor
Mosese
Myrnamae
Nahiwa
Nalani
Napua
Nelita
Noa
Nobby
Noelani
Ochie
Olisaemeka
Paciencie
Paiea
Pecoraro
Pierluigi
Pelin
Perfecto
Perpetua
Policarpio
Princess
Prosper
Pualani
Puanani
Punahele
Remedios
Renalynn
Reveena
Rhinehardt
Roshani
Satoru
Segunda
Siosifa
Takaji
Tante
Theisman
Theopista
Tiborcio
Torao
Uilani
Uldarico
Ululani
Vandale
Vashti
Vilani
Volsha
Wallumore
Wiliama
Wren
Yukitaka
Ziana

****Kaulananapua must have come from the Hawaiian patriotic song “Kaulana Na Pua.” The title translates to “famous are the flowers.”

These 150+ names actually represent a sizeable chunk of the population (estimated at somewhere between 7,000 and 8,000 residents).

P.S. One other name I noticed while searching was Deepak Chopra. My first thought was, “Wow, someone has the same name as Deepak Chopra?” Then I did some digging, and it seems that the real Dr. Chopra does indeed have ties to the island. So…if you want to call Deepak Chopra directly, try the Molokai white pages.

Hawaii Posts: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7