How popular is the baby name Lam in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Lam and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Lam.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Lam

Number of Babies Named Lam

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Lam

Vietnamese Names in America, 1975

The theme this week? Names that tie back to the end of the Vietnam War.

Yesterday’s name, Chaffee, isn’t the only Vietnam-related name we see on the charts in 1975. There are plenty of Vietnamese names that pop up that year as well. Here are the ones I’ve spotted so far:

Vietnamese Boy Name Debuts, 1975 Vietnamese Girl Name Debuts, 1975
Viet, 23 baby boys [top debut]
Hung, 16 [4th]
Nam, 14 [6th]
Huy, 13 [7th]
Long, 11
Vu, 10
Tran, 9
Duc, 8
Dung, 8
Hoang, 8
My, 8
Nguyen, 8
An, 7
Luan, 7
Phong, 7
Binh, 6
Minh, 6
Quoc, 6
Anh, 5
Hai, 5
Linh, 5
Quang, 5
Tien, 5
Yun, 5
Anh, 10 baby girls [58th highest debut]
Phuong, 9
Nguyen, 7
Thu, 7
Bich, 6
Linh, 6
Thao, 6
Trang, 6
Chau, 5
Hoa, 5
Lien, 5
Ngoc, 5
Viet, 5
Yen, 5

Many other Vietnamese names — Bao, Chinh, Dao, Giang, Huong, Khanh, Lam, Nguyet, Phuc, Quyen, Suong, Thanh, Vuong, and so forth — debut on the SSA’s list during the late ’70s and early ’80s.

One of the Vietnamese babies born at Chaffee in 1975 was Dat Nguyen, who went on to become the first Vietnamese-American to play in the NFL. His name, Dat, wasn’t popular enough to make the national list until 1979.

[For context, one of the pop culture names that debuted in 1975 was Chakakhan. Another was Tennille, inspired by Captain & Tennille.]

Tropical Cyclone Names – Abdul, Fletcher, Timba, Vongfong

Hurricane Bill didn’t make landfall last weekend, and Tropical Storm Danny probably won’t have much impact this weekend. It’s been a rather uneventful storm season for New England thus far.

So let’s spice things up with a selection of tropical cyclone names from areas other than the humdrum Atlantic Ocean:

  • Australian Region: Bruce, Fletcher, Gillian, Hamish, Jasmine, Kirrily, Lam, Narelle, Olwyn, Tiffany
  • Central North Pacific: Akoni, Ele, Halola, Iolana, Keoni, Maka, Niala, Oliwa, Ulana, Walaka
  • Eastern North Pacific: Aletta, Blas, Fausto, Isis, Jova, Kiko, Orlene, Paine, Sergio, Wiley
  • Fiji Region: Atu, Beni, Cilla, Funa, Lusi, Nute, Tui, Vaianu, Zita, Zuman
  • Northern Indian Ocean: Baazu, Fanoos, Hudhud, Khai Muk, Mukda, Nargis, Ockhi, Pyarr, Titli, Vaali
  • Papua New Guinea Region: Abdul, Epi, Guba, Gule, Igo, Kamit, Matere, Rowe, Taka, Upia
  • Philippine Region: Basyang, Butchoy, Dencio, Igme, Ineng, Lawin, Ompong, Quiel, Siony, Yoyoy
  • Southwest Indian Ocean: Boloetse, Fame, Humba, Jaya, Olipa, Pindile, Timba, Wilby, Xylo, Zoelle
  • Western North Pacific: Ewiniar, Hagibis, Krovanh, Mindulle, Nock-ten, Phanfone, Songda, Vongfong, Wutip, Yutu

Did you catch Kirrily up there in the Australian group? I’m really curious about that one. It’s a female name, but not listed in any of the name references I own. The Maori langauge doesn’t include an L-sound, so that’s not it. Perhaps it’s just Kira/Kiri + Lee. If you know anything about the name Kirrily, please comment!

Source: Tropical Cyclone Names – National Hurricane Center

UPDATE, 11/2013: The name of the typhoon that just hit the Philippines, Haiyan, means “petrel” in Chinese. A petrel is a seabird. (People in the Philippines are calling the storm “Yolanda,” though.)