How popular is the baby name Lara in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Lara and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Lara.

The graph will take a few seconds to load, thanks for your patience. (Don't worry, it shouldn't take nine months.) If it's taking too long, try reloading the page.


Popularity of the Baby Name Lara

Number of Babies Named Lara

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Lara

Name Quotes #50: Rocket, Lenore, Heloise

clueless, quote, cher, dionne

Clueless character Cher on the similarity between her name and that of her best friend Dionne:

We were both named after great singers of the past who now do infomercials.

(Dionne’s name comes from Dionne Warwick.)

From a 2007 interview in People with film director Robert Rodriguez (whose kids are named Rocket, Racer, Rebel, Rogue, and Rhiannon):

Asked about his children’s unusual names, Robert attributes them to side effects he sustained from his college years when he subjected himself to medical tests to make extra money.

“Rocket is the first one. And once you name your first kid Rocket, you can’t name your next kid Marty. Racer, Rebel, Rogue…I’m just gonna blame this on the medical experiments. But they do have regular middle names in case they don’t want to start their own wrestling team.”

(An Australian celebrity named Lara Bingle has two sons named Rocket and Racer…perhaps in homage to Robert Rodriguez?)

From Incomplete birth certificates create a bureaucratic morass by Andrew Ryan in the Boston Globe:

A generation ago — when more families had six or more children — babies without official first names were surprisingly common. Overwhelmed new parents would leave the hospital without completing birth certificate paperwork.

But what once seemed like a quaint oddity becomes a serious inconvenience in a world of identity theft and terrorism. Today, governments demand birth certificates.

As more Baby Boomers reach retirement age, vital statistics offices — including at Boston City Hall — continue to receive a trickle of people whose birth certificates carry no first name. Boston officials estimated that in the 1950s, roughly 1 of every 25 birth certificates lacked a first name.

From the 1970 obituary of actress Lenore Ulric in the New York Times:

Born in the little town of New Ulm, Minn., in 1892, the daughter of Franz Xavier Ulrich, an Army hospital steward, Miss Ulric (she dropped the H from her last name) used to say that she was predestined for the stage. Her father gave her the name of Lenore because of his fondness for Poe’s poem, “The Raven,” and her childhood was devoted to theatrical yearnings.

(She played Wetona on stage in 1916.)

Name expert Kunio Makino, as quoted in What to call baby? by Tomoko Otake in The Japan Times:

“I think people who come up with bizarre names for their children tend to feel that they couldn’t live the life they wanted to, and they feel that they have been hindered by many rules and restrictions. The only freedom they have at their disposal, they think, is the right to name their child.”

From Hi, My Name Is Héloïse by Héloïse Chung (formerly Kathy Bryant):

I leaned toward names made of calm, feminine sounds that never sounded like someone was yelling at you. The harsh K in Kathy conjured up my mother’s words for me: kigibe, keoji, shikkeuro. Korean for girl, beggar, and shut up. But I still wasn’t ready. I switched from Kathy to “Kate,” which felt like a small step, but not one nearly big enough.

[…]

Once the universe gave me the OK, a little space seemed to open up for the name to find me. And so it was that Héloïse fluttered into my head one day, devastatingly perfect. I’m not sure exactly where it came from. Perhaps some derivation of Luisita (a friend) or Elio (a boy I used to babysit). I guess I have a thing for L names. I honed it, trying it with and without the H and with and without the diacritics. I didn’t want them to be an affectation. Is it gauche to use French spelling if you don’t even speak French? Eff it, I went with the French.

From Why and how Ontarians change their names in the 21st century by Eric Andrew-Gee in The Globe and Mail:

Some change their names by truncation, some by hyphenation, others by amalgamation, others by invention. Some changes are banal, done for everyday reasons – a divorce, a marriage, a mistransliteration (an imprecise conversion from one alphabet to another) – while others are poignant, playful, even poetic.

When I asked people about their choice while reporting this story, virtually no one was glib. Many would go on and on, grateful to talk about a decision that cuts to the marrow of who they are. Others became tearful and, in some cases, shuddered audibly at the sound of their birth names. Some even declined to discuss the subject.

For more name-related quotes, check out the name quotes category.


Popular Baby Names in Switzerland, 2015

According to data from the Swiss Federal Statistical Office (OFS), the country’s most popular baby names last year were Mia and Noah.

Here are Switzerland’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2015:

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Mia
2. Emma
3. Lara
4. Lena
5. Sofia
6. Mila
7. Anna
8. Elena
9. Laura
10. Lina
1. Noah
2. Liam
3. Luca
4. Gabriel
5. Leon
6. David
7. Matteo
8. Elias
9. Louis
10. Levin

In 2014 the top names were Emma and Noah.

And here are the top names within each of the main language groups:

Language Group Girl Names Boy Names
German speakers
(64% of Switzerland)
1. Mia
2. Emma
3. Lena
1. Leon
2. Noah
3. Luca
French speakers
(23%)
1. Emma
2. Alice
3. Eva
1. Gabriel
2. Liam
3. Noah
Italian speakers
(8%)
1. Sofia
2. Emma
3. Noemi
1. Leonardo
2. Alessandro
3. Liam
Romansh speakers
(less than 1%)
1. Alessia 1. Laurin

Sources: Most popular Swiss baby names in 2015 (via Clare’s Name News), Switzerland Statistics

Popular Baby Names in Slovenia, 2015

According to data from the Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia, the most popular baby names in the country in 2015 were Ema and Luka.

Here are Slovenia’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2015:

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Ema, 267 baby girls
2. Eva, 259
3. Zala, 240
4. Sara, 220
5. Lara, 206
6. Nika, 205
7. Julija, 200
8. Ana, 183
9. Lana, 176
10. Mia, 174
1. Luka, 328 baby boys
2. Filip, 254
3. Nik, 248
4. Mark, 222
5. Žan, 206
6. Jakob, 206
7. Jaka, 191
8. Žiga, 178
9. David, 168
10. Anže, 164

In the girls’ top 10, Ana and Lana replace Neža and Zoja.

In the boys’ top 10, Žiga and David replace Jan and Vid.

Here are the 2014 rankings for Slovenia. For other European baby name rankings, see the European name rankings subcategory.

Sources: Popularity of Names in Slovenia, 2015, Imena in priimki

Popular Baby Names in Switzerland, 2014

According to data from the Swiss Federal Office of Statistics (OFS), the country’s most popular baby names overall in 2014 were Emma and Noah.

But the #1 names within each language group don’t quite match up with these overall #1 names, so here are Switzerland’s top baby names of 2014 broken down by language group:

French

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Emma (163 baby girls)
2. Eva (98)
3. Léa (96)
4. Camille (85)
5. Zoé (84)
6. Alice (83)
7. Chloé (82)
8. Alicia (74)
1. Gabriel (153 baby boys)
2. Liam (128)
3. Lucas (113)
4. Ethan (107)
5. Nathan (104)
6. Noah (102)
7. Louis (97)
8. Luca (94)

Ethan jumped from 12th to 4th, and Camille continues to rise (8th to 4th).

German

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Mia (312 baby girls)
2. Lara (294)
3. Emma (293)
4. Laura (277)
5. Anna (271)
6. Sara (245)
7. Lea (244)
8. Leonie (234)
1. Noah (338 baby boys)
2. Leon (313)
3. Luca (288)
4. Levin (280)
5. David (265)
6. Elias (259) – tie
6. Julian (259) – tie
8. Tim (246)

Elias jumped from 14th to 6th, and Anna from 12th to 5th.

Italian

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Giulia (34 baby girls)
2. Sofia (33)
3. Emma (28)
4. Alice (26)
5. Emily (24) – tie
5. Mia (24) – tie
7. Aurora (23) – tie
7. Noemi (23) – tie
1. Leonardo (40 baby boys)
1. Gabriel (37)
3. Liam (31)
4. Alessandro (24)
5. Lorenzo (23)
6. Enea (20)
7. Matteo (19) – tie
7. Noah (19) – tie

Enea jumped from 19th to 6th, and Aurora from 12th to 7th.

Romansh

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Luana
2. Léonie
1. Andrin
2. Nino

According to a Behind the Name contributor, Andrin is a “Romansh form of Heinrich (Henry), originally from the Engadine valley in southeast Switzerland.”

Finally, here are Switzerland’s top baby names for 2013, 2012 and 2007.

Sources: The Swiss name that’s popular across all languages – 2014 baby names, Swiss Statistics – The most popular first names

Popular Baby Names in Slovenia, 2014

According to data from the Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia, the most popular baby names in the country in 2014 were Eva and Luka.

Here are Slovenia’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2014:

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Eva, 282 baby girls
2. Ema, 271
3. Nika, 228
4. Lara, 227
5. Sara, 222
6. Zala, 207
7. Julija, 206
8. Mia, 202
9. Neža, 188
10. Zoja, 179
1. Luka, 276 baby boys
2. Nik, 269
3. Filip, 253
4. Jakob, 240
5. Mark, 208
6. Žan, 203
7. Anže, 197
8. Jan, 183
9. Jaka, 180
10. Vid, 177

Very short names overall, aren’t they? Some explanations:

  • The girl names Zala, Neža and Zoja are related to Rosalia (Rozalija), Agnes and Zoe.
  • The boy names Anže, Jaka and Vid are related to Johannes (Janez), Jacob and Vitus/Wido.

New to the girls’ top 10 are are Mia and Neža, which replace Ana and Lana.

New to the boys’ top 10 are Anže and Vid, which replace David and Žiga.

Big jumps within the top 50 include Sofia (was 66th, now 48th) and Mila (was 45th, now 27th).

Sources: Births, Slovenia, 2014, Girl names, Slovenia, Boys names, Slovenia, Behind the Name (Thank you to daijirou for the Slovenia list!)