How popular is the baby name Leonardo in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Leonardo and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Leonardo.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Leonardo

Number of Babies Named Leonardo

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Leonardo

Popular Baby Names in Switzerland, 2015

According to data from the Swiss Federal Statistical Office (OFS), the country’s most popular baby names last year were Mia and Noah.

Here are Switzerland’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2015:

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Mia
2. Emma
3. Lara
4. Lena
5. Sofia
6. Mila
7. Anna
8. Elena
9. Laura
10. Lina
1. Noah
2. Liam
3. Luca
4. Gabriel
5. Leon
6. David
7. Matteo
8. Elias
9. Louis
10. Levin

In 2014 the top names were Emma and Noah.

And here are the top names within each of the main language groups:

Language Group Girl Names Boy Names
German speakers
(64% of Switzerland)
1. Mia
2. Emma
3. Lena
1. Leon
2. Noah
3. Luca
French speakers
(23%)
1. Emma
2. Alice
3. Eva
1. Gabriel
2. Liam
3. Noah
Italian speakers
(8%)
1. Sofia
2. Emma
3. Noemi
1. Leonardo
2. Alessandro
3. Liam
Romansh speakers
(less than 1%)
1. Alessia 1. Laurin

Sources: Most popular Swiss baby names in 2015 (via Clare’s Name News), Switzerland Statistics


Popular Baby Names in Northern Ireland, 2015

According to data from the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA), the most popular baby names in Northern Ireland in 2015 were Emily and James.

Here are the Northern Ireland’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2015:

Baby Girl Names Baby Boy Names
1. Emily, 233 baby girls
2. Ella, 197
3. Grace, 192
4. Sophie, 179
5. Olivia, 153
6. Anna, 152
7. Amelia, 149
8. Aoife, 147
9. Lucy, 146
10. Ava, 141
1. James, 300 baby boys
2. Jack, 261
3. Noah, 225
4. Charlie, 213
5. Daniel, 188
6. Oliver, 186
7. Matthew, 168
8. Harry, 166
9. Thomas, 157
10. Jake, 141

In the the girls’ top ten, Aoife and Ava replace Sophia and Eva. On the boys’ side, Matthew and Jake replace Ethan and Jacob.

And here are some names from the other end of the list:

Rare Girl Names Rare Boy Names
Abernathy, Aiza, Albany, Billie-Jean, Binky, Button, Cami-Li, Cashleen, Chaitra, Cherithabel, Cyrah-Steph, Eluanny, Everleigh, Felmora, Iga, Izide, Kincso, Margaressa, Merve, Ryve, Saiorse-Miley-Mochara, Texas, Urte, Yophi Acheron, Anugy, Bobeh, Carlow, Clepson, Csanad, Dermy, Dirly, Florin-Leonardo, Idrissa, Johnver, Karabo, Kenzen, Kygo, Lavezzi, Lincoln-Kidd, Lingaa, Majky, Niamkey, Noveldino, Oregon, Sorley-Logan, Ugnius, Zbyszko

Each of the above was given to fewer than three babies (so, used just once or twice) in Northern Ireland last year.

The top names in 2014 were Emily and Jack.

Source: Top Baby Names – NISRA

Donatello, the Ninja Turtle Baby Name

Donatello the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle
Donatello of TMNT
The name Donatello debuted on the baby name charts in 1990:

  • 1992: unlisted
  • 1991: 11 boys named Donatello
  • 1990: 12 boys named Donatello [debut]
  • 1989: unlisted

If you were a TV-watching kid during those years, you already know what inspired this one: the brainy, purple-masked, bo staff-wielding turtle Donatello of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. (All four turtles were named after Renaissance artists.)

Turtle-mania peaked during the late ’80s and early ’90s, and if you look at the three other Ninja Turtle names — Leonardo, Michaelangelo*, and Raphael — you’ll see that usage for all of them rose during this period.

And now, the important question of all: Who’s your favorite Ninja Turtle?

*The character’s name is spelled correctly (Michelangelo) nowadays, but back then it was not.

Popular Baby Names in Switzerland, 2014

According to data from the Swiss Federal Office of Statistics (OFS), the country’s most popular baby names overall in 2014 were Emma and Noah.

But the #1 names within each language group don’t quite match up with these overall #1 names, so here are Switzerland’s top baby names of 2014 broken down by language group:

French

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Emma (163 baby girls)
2. Eva (98)
3. Léa (96)
4. Camille (85)
5. Zoé (84)
6. Alice (83)
7. Chloé (82)
8. Alicia (74)
1. Gabriel (153 baby boys)
2. Liam (128)
3. Lucas (113)
4. Ethan (107)
5. Nathan (104)
6. Noah (102)
7. Louis (97)
8. Luca (94)

Ethan jumped from 12th to 4th, and Camille continues to rise (8th to 4th).

German

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Mia (312 baby girls)
2. Lara (294)
3. Emma (293)
4. Laura (277)
5. Anna (271)
6. Sara (245)
7. Lea (244)
8. Leonie (234)
1. Noah (338 baby boys)
2. Leon (313)
3. Luca (288)
4. Levin (280)
5. David (265)
6. Elias (259) – tie
6. Julian (259) – tie
8. Tim (246)

Elias jumped from 14th to 6th, and Anna from 12th to 5th.

Italian

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Giulia (34 baby girls)
2. Sofia (33)
3. Emma (28)
4. Alice (26)
5. Emily (24) – tie
5. Mia (24) – tie
7. Aurora (23) – tie
7. Noemi (23) – tie
1. Leonardo (40 baby boys)
1. Gabriel (37)
3. Liam (31)
4. Alessandro (24)
5. Lorenzo (23)
6. Enea (20)
7. Matteo (19) – tie
7. Noah (19) – tie

Enea jumped from 19th to 6th, and Aurora from 12th to 7th.

Romansh

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Luana
2. Léonie
1. Andrin
2. Nino

According to a Behind the Name contributor, Andrin is a “Romansh form of Heinrich (Henry), originally from the Engadine valley in southeast Switzerland.”

Finally, here are Switzerland’s top baby names for 2013, 2012 and 2007.

Sources: The Swiss name that’s popular across all languages – 2014 baby names, Swiss Statistics – The most popular first names

Name Quotes for the Weekend #28

Keira Knightly quote about  her misspelled name

From an interview with Keira Knightley in Elle (UK):

Keira also revealed that she was never intended to be called Keira.

‘I was meant to be named “Kiera”, after a Russian ice skater who was on the TV one day. My dad fancied her and nicked her name for me. But it was my mum who went to register my birth, and she accidentally spelled “ei” instead of “ie” because my mum’s crap at spelling.

‘Apparently, when she came back he said: “WHAT THE F*CK? You’ve spelt her name wrong!” What were they going to do, though? Once it’s on the piece of paper, it’s on the piece of paper. And that’s me. A spelling error.’

From There’s Something About Nutella (about the French parents who tried to name their baby Nutella) by lawyer Wes Anderson:

If only the parents lived in the United States, then they may likely have realized their dream. While many European countries place various restrictions on baby names, American parents may generally use a trademark as a personal name, so long as it is a word mark and both parents consent to the name. Brand loyalty may have some limits abroad, but the courts on our shores would hardly object to baby Nutella.

From Parents seek unique names for their children in The Japan News:

Under the Family Registration Law, about 3,000 kanji can be used for a person’s name, including joyo kanji (kanji designated for common use) and kanji exclusively used for people’s names. Hiragana and katakana can be used as well. However, there are no rules regarding how a kanji character should be read in a name or how long the name can be.

In recent years, more and more variations are showing up in children’s names with nonstandard pronunciations apparently becoming prominent. For example, the kanji “kokoro” (heart) is often read “ko” these days, while “ai” (love) is read “a.”

[…]

At one kindergarten in Kanagawa Prefecture, teachers write down the phonetic readings of all the new pupils’ names on the roll before the entrance ceremony to check how they should be read.

“It’s a shock for parents to hear their children’s names read out incorrectly,” a staff member of the kindergarten said.

Tamago Club, a magazine for expecting mothers published by Benesse Corp., is calling on readers to avoid names whose kanji readings are too different from the norm.

From the book The Leonardo DiCaprio Album by Brian J. Robb:

Leonardo Wilhelm DiCaprio was born in Los Angeles on 11th November 1974 to burnt-out hippie parents who named him after the Renaissance artist Leonardo Da Vinci. His mother, German-born Irmelin Idenbirken chose her son’s name after feeling him kicking in the womb as she stood in front of a Da Vinci painting in the Uffizi Gallery in Venice, Italy.

From Why We Like Boys Better Than Girls (Or At Least Their Names) by Laura Wattenberg:

Our modern naming age sees lots of names flowing around the gender divide. Some traditional male names, like Micah and Riley, are showing up more and more on the girls’ side. Other names with no traditional gender link, like word names, place names, and surnames, are flipping back and forth or remaining unisex. But even in this fluid, creative naming culture, I challenge you to find a traditionally female name that is given to boys. Much as a reference to running or fighting “like a girl” is taken as an insult, so do we shrink from any hint of girliness in our boys’ names. As a result, the move toward androgyny in baby names turns out to look an awful lot like masculinization.

[…]

Names have enormous symbolic power. They send messages. What message would it send to girls if the women of the U.S. Supreme Court were named Raymond, Simon and Elliot instead of Ruth, Sonia and Elena? Just as we may wish for a future where “running like a girl” means “running as fast and long as you can,” I’m rooting for a future where a little Leia is considered just as bold and confident as a girl dressed — or named — like Han.

From the Survivor Wiki page about Neleh Davis, the runner-up from Survivor: Marquesas (2002):

Neleh Dennis was born in Heber City, Utah, and is one of eight siblings (five brothers, Tom, John, Devin, Nathan, and Landon, and two sisters, McKenna and Robyn). She was named after her maternal grandmother, Helen. Same name, only spelled backwards.

From an interview with Dax Shepard [vid] on Ellen:

Ellen: Where does the name Delta come from, was that something you had thought of before?

Dax: So Delta actually–it was a joke, because our first daughter’s name is Lincoln, which is very masculine, so a friend of mine teasingly texted me, “Oh great, what’s this one gonna be, Navy Seal? Delta Force? Green Beret?” And I was reading this text out loud to Kristen, I’m like, “Oh listen to how funny this is, Steve said, what if we named her Delta Force” and I was like…Delta! Delta Bell Shepard, that’s it! And that’s it.

Want to see quote posts #1 through #27? Check out the quote post category. Have a nice weekend, all!

Popular Baby Names in Italy, 2013

Commenter skizzo recently asked me to check on Italy’s 2014 baby name rankings. They aren’t out yet, but the 2013 list is, and since I’ve never posted a popularity list for Italy before, I thought I’d go ahead and post the older list while we wait for the newer one.

According to data from Istituto nazionale di statistica (Istat), the most popular baby names in Italy in 2013 were Sofia and Francesco.

Here are Italy’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2013:

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Sofia
2. Giulia
3. Aurora
4. Emma
5. Giorgia
6. Martina
7. Chiara
8. Sara
9. Alice
10. Gaia
1. Francesco
2. Alessandro
3. Andrea
4. Lorenzo
5. Mattia
6. Matteo
7. Gabriele
8. Leonardo
9. Riccardo
10. Tommaso

Check out Francesco’s rise in usage from 2012 to 2013, no doubt due to the election of Pope Francis in March of 2013:

Baby name Francesco sees rise in usage in Italy, 2013

Funny thing is, Francesco has long been Italy’s most popular boy name, so in 2013 it just become more dominantly popular.

And what’s the difference between Mattia and Matteo? Not much — they’re just the Italian forms of Matthias and Matthew, which are derived from the same Hebrew root name.

For earlier sets of data from Italy, click the link below. Istat currently offers top 50 lists going back to 1999.

Source: Nomi – Istat

Popular Baby Names in Switzerland, 2013

Switzerland’s (many) top baby names of 2013 were announced recently.

According to data from the Swiss Federal Statistical Office, the country’s most popular baby names last year were:

  • Emma and Gabriel for French-speakers,
  • Mia and Noah for German-speakers,
  • Sofia and Gabriel for Italian-speakers, and
  • Chiara and Jonas for Romansh-speakers.

Here are Switzerland’s top girl names and top boy names of 2013 within each language group.

French-speakers:

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Emma (125 baby girls)
2. Chloé (98)
3. Léa (93)
4. Eva (90)
5. Alice (86)
6. Zoé (84)
7. Sofia (76)
8. Camille (75)
1. Gabriel (142 baby boys)
2. Liam (120)
3. Théo (112)
4. Noah (109)
5. Luca (104)
6. Nathan (104)
7. Léo (100)
8. Thomas (97)

The fastest risers from 2012 to 2013 were Liam (11th to 2nd) and Camille (16th to 8th).

German-speakers:

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Mia (313 baby girls)
2. Alina (281)
3. Sara (248)
4. Laura (247)
5. Lea (244)
6. Sophia (241)
7. Leonie (238)
8. Emma (227)
1. Noah (307 baby boys)
2. Leon (281)
3. Luca (271)
4. Julian (243)
5. Levin (241)
6. David (234)
7. Nico (229)
8. Gian (219)

The fastest risers from 2012 to 2013 were Sara (13th to 3rd) and Sophia (16th to 6th).

Italian-speakers:

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Sofia (33 baby girls)
2. Emma (28)
3. Emily (26)
3. Giulia (26)
5. Alice (23)
5. Melissa (23)
7. Mia (21)
8. Noemi (19)
1. Gabriel (35 baby boys)
2. Leonardo (34)
3. Mattia (29)
4. Matteo (27)
5. Alessandro (26)
6. Nathan (24)
7. Samuele (21)
8. Federico (20)

The fastest risers from 2012 to 2013 were Emily (32nd to 3rd) and Noemi (19th to 8th).

Romansh-speakers:

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Chiara (4 baby girls) 1. Jonas (3 baby boys)

Last year, when I posted about the 2012 names, I mentioned Switzerland’s small Romansh-speaking population. What were their top names? Cool to see some data being released this year!

Sources: Swiss parents steadfast in baby name choices, Swiss Statistics – The most popular first names