How popular is the baby name Luc in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Luc.

The graph will take a few seconds to load, thanks for your patience. (Don't worry, it shouldn't take nine months.) If it's taking too long, try reloading the page.


Popularity of the Baby Name Luc


Posts that Mention the Name Luc

Popular Baby Names in Austria, 2017

According to Statistics Austria, the most popular baby names in the country in 2017 were Anna and Maximilian.

Here are Austria’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2017:

Girl Names
1. Anna, 949 baby girls
2. Emma, 825
3. Marie, 674
4. Lena, 665
5. Laura, 656
6. Sophia, 649
7. Emilia, 618
8. Mia, 574
9. Sophie, 560
10. Johanna, 553

Boy Names
1. Maximilian, 908 baby boys
2. Paul, 814
3. David, 798
4. Elias, 783 (tie)
4. Jakob, 783 (tie)
6. Lukas, 760
7. Felix, 747
8. Alexander, 742
9. Tobias, 741
10. Jonas, 726

In 2016, Austria’s top two names were Anna and David.

Austria also puts out a set of rankings that combines names with the same etymological roots. On that list, the top name groups were:

  • “Anna” (Ana, Ann, Anna, Anne, Annè, Chana, Channa, Haina, Hana, Hanah, Hanna, Hannah, Hanne, Hena, Iana, Jaana, Jana, Janah, Jannah, Yahna, Yana), and
  • “Lukas” (Luc, Luca, Lucas, Lúcás, Lucca, Luka, Lukas, Lukás, Lukáš, Lukasz, Łukasz, Luke).

Source: Anna und Maximilian waren 2017 die beliebtesten Babynamen

Distinctively Canadian First Names

Here are the most distinctively Canadian first names by decade, according to Canadian website The 10 and 3:

  • 2010s: Zainab and Linden
  • 2000s: Gurleen and Callum
  • 1990s: Simran and Mathieu
  • 1980s: Chantelle and Darcy
  • 1970s: Josee and Stephane
  • 1960s: Giuseppina and Luc
  • 1950s: Heather and Giuseppe
  • 1940s: Heather and Lorne
  • 1930s: Isobel and Lorne
  • 1920s: Gwendoline and Lorne

Did you know that Canada’s love of “Lorne” comes from the Marquess of Lorne, the British nobleman who served as Governor General of Canada from 1878 to 1883? To see more explanations, and also more names per decade, check out the source article.

The name I’m most curious about is Josée from the 1970s. It had a “Canadian factor” of 634.6 — larger than any other name in the study — but also had no explanation, and I can’t figure out the influence. Does anyone have a guess?

Source: Gord, Sheila, Graham and Beverley? The Most Distinctively Canadian Names Are Not What You’d Expect

Popular Baby Names in Austria, 2015

According to data released in December of 2016 by Statistics Austria, the most popular baby names in the country in 2015 were Anna (and variants) and Lukas (and variants).

Here are Austria’s top 10 girl name-groups and top 10 boy name-groups of 2015:

Girl Names
1. Anna (21 variants, including Ann, Hannah, Yahna)
2. Sophie (12 variants, including Sophia)
3. Maria (36 variants, including Merry, Moira, Miriam)
4. Emilia (14 variants)
5. Elena (40 variants, including Elaine, Helen, Ilijana)
6. Emma (1 variant)
7. Lena (8 variants)
8. Sarah (9 variants)
9. Mia (2 variants)
10. Laura (1 variant)

Boy Names
1. Lukas (11 variants, including Luc)
2. David (12 variants)
3. Jakob (20 variants, including Giacomo, Jaime, Tiago)
4. Elias (31 variants, including Ilian)
5. Maximilian (9 variants)
6. Alexander (32 variants, including Alejandro, Alistair, Iskender)
7. Jonas (12 variants)
8. Paul (7 variants, including Pablo)
9. Tobias (3 variants)
10. Leon (7 variants, including Levon)

The #1 name-groups were the same in 2014. There are no new entries on either top 10 list.

Source: Anna und Lukas sind die beliebtesten Babynamen 2015 (found via Popularity of Names in Austria, 2015)

Jean-Luc: Another Star Trek-Inspired Baby Name

Jean-Luc Picard, Early Grey Tea
“Tea. Earl Grey. Hot.” -Capt. Jean-Luc Picard
© CBS Studios Inc.

The name Jean-Luc debuted on the SSA’s list in 1987, and peak usage was in 1992:

  • 1993: 63 baby boys named Jean-Luc
  • 1992: 65 baby boys named Jean-Luc
  • 1991: 46 baby boys named Jean-Luc
  • 1990: 26 baby boys named Jean-Luc
  • 1989: 21 baby boys named Jean-Luc
  • 1988: 14 baby boys named Jean-Luc
  • 1987: 8 baby boys named Jean-Luc [debut]
  • 1986: unlisted

The inspiration?

Captain Jean-Luc Picard of the starship Enterprise.

Picard, played by Patrick Stewart, was the central character in the TV show Star Trek: The Next Generation, which premiered in late 1987 and ran until mid-1994.

The character, though born and raised in 24th-century France, was a native English speaker. How? According to the show, French had become an obscure language by the 2300s. And yet, interestingly, the people of English-speaking future-France were still getting very traditional French names. Picard’s parents were named Maurice and Yvette, for instance. (Do you think this is a believable scenario?)

The names Geordi and Riker also debuted during the years TNG was on the air. They were likely inspired by the characters Will Riker (first officer) and Geordi La Forge (chief engineer, played by LeVar Burton).

The only other Star Trek name I’ve blogged about so far is Uhura, but there are more coming up…

In the meanwhile, what do you think of the name Jean-Luc?

Image: Star Trek Earl Grey Tea