How popular is the baby name Lucifer in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Lucifer.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Lucifer


Posts that Mention the Name Lucifer

Mazikeen and Amenadiel

The baby name Mazikeen debuted in the U.S. baby name data in 2016.

Several Neil Gaiman characters (e.g., Coraline, Yvaine) have influenced baby names in the past, so here are several more that are influencing baby names right now.

These names come courtesy of the TV show Lucifer (2016-), which was loosely based on Gaiman’s comic book series The Sandman (1989-1996).

The premise of the show is that the main character, Lucifer (played by Tom Ellis), bored with Hell, has decided to move to Los Angeles and open a night club called “Lux.” (The Latin word lux, meaning “light,” comes directly from Lucifer’s name, meaning “light bearer.”)

In 2017, the baby name Lucifer saw its highest-ever usage so far — a fact that would no doubt alarm a large number of Americans.

Lucifer’s right-hand man is a lady: Mazikeen “Maze” Smith (played by Lesley-Ann Brandt). She’s a demon who followed Lucifer to Earth as his sworn protector. At the start of the series, she worked as a bartender at Lux.

The baby name Mazikeen debuted in the data in 2016, and Maze debuted for girls specifically the next year.

Lucifer’s eldest brother is Amenadiel (played by D. B. Woodside). He’s an archangel (still in God’s good graces) who has a contentious relationship with Lucifer, who he encourages to return to Hell.

The baby name Amenadiel debuted in the data in 2017.

MazikeenMazeAmenadiel
201727 girls15 boys &
9 girls [debut]
9 boys [debut]
2016
7 girls [debut]11 boys.
2015.14 boys.

Though Mazikeen and Amenadiel both sound biblical, neither one is found in the Bible. Mazikeen is based on the Hebrew word mazzikim, meaning “harmful spirits.” Amenadiel’s explanation has eluded me so far, but, like many Hebrew names, it ends with -el, which refers to “God.”

What are your thoughts on these two new names? How about on the rising usage of Lucifer?

Sources: List of Lucifer characters – Wikipedia, Jewish Concepts: Demons & Demonology

P.S. Also on TV right now is American Gods (2017-), based on the Neil Gaiman book of the same name. I thought the show might give the name Shadow a big boost, but so far this isn’t the case.

Names in the News: Revy, Cali, Jameson

Some recent and not-so-recent baby names from the news…

Abbey: A baby girl born in England in November of 2017 was named Abbey in honor of Dr. Abey Eapen, her parents’ fertility doctor. (Mirror)

Blake Ramsey: A baby girl born in Florida in January of 2018 was named Blake Ramsey after Jaguars football players Blake Bortles and Jalen Ramsey. (First Coast News)

Cali: A baby girl born into the Perry family of Kentucky in July of 2017 was named Cali Perry in honor of John Calipari, head coach of the Kentucky Wildcats basketball team. (SEC Country)

  • Here’s another Cali from a couple of weeks ago.

Derc’hen (rejected): A baby boy born in France in August of 2017 was almost named Derc’hen, but the French government rejected the name because of the apostrophe. (The c’h is “a combination widely used in Breton language.”) (The Local)

Fañch (rejected): A baby boy born in France in May of 2017 was almost named Fañch, a traditional Breton diminutive of François, but the French government rejected the name because of the tilde over the n. (The Local)

Harveigh: A calf born in Texas a few days after Hurricane Harvey was named Harveigh. (Today)

Jameson: A baby boy born in Missouri in February of 2018 — and whose birth was broadcast live on his mom’s St. Louis radio show — was named Jameson, thanks to radio listeners who’d voted in a name poll held in January. (Newsweek)

Joshua: A baby boy born in Wisconsin in September of 2017 was named Joshua in honor of Dr. Josh Medow, the doctor who’d saved his mother’s life two years earlier. (Fox47)

Lucifer (rejected): A baby boy born in Germany in 2017 was almost named Lucifer, but the government rejected the name due to the association with evil. He’s now known as Lucian. (Deutsche Welle)

Olivia: A baby girl born into the Garton family of Arkansas in December of 2017 was named Olivia Garton as a tribute to Olive Garden restaurant. (ABC News)

Pilzner (rejected): A baby boy born in Sweden in August of 2017 was almost named Pilzner after his grandfather (nicknamed Pilzner), his father (nicknamed Pilzner), and Pilsner lager (clearly a family favorite), but the government rejected the name. (The Local)

Revy: A baby girl born in California in November of 2017 was named Revy after the ski town of Revelstoke, British Columbia. (CBC)

Brady Ruben Nuno: A baby boy born in England in December of 2017 was named Brady Ruben Nuno after: American football player Tom Brady, Portuguese footballer Ruben Neves, and Wolverhampton Wanderers F.C. head coach Nuno Espirito Santo. (Express & Star)

Swachhata: A baby girl born in India in February of 2018 was named “Swachhata” in recognition of the country’s cleanliness campaign, Swachh Bharat Abhiyan. (Hindustan Times)

More Baby Names Banned in New Zealand

In 2011, New Zealand released a list of banned baby names. Names from that list have be circulating for years now, but I’d never seen any legit updates…until a few weeks ago.

Here are four baby names that were rejected by the NZ Department of Internal Affairs in 2015:

  • Commodore
  • Empress
  • Royahl
  • Superintedent

And here’s what the country’s Registrar-General had to say about intentionally misspelled names like Royahl:

“People will try it on, they will try to change a letter here or there and say it’s not an official title because it’s spelt differently. But if it sounds like an official title I won’t approve it, and that’s because potentially that child is going to end up perhaps in a court, and that name would be read out in court, and that would be inappropriate.”

He also noted that “about 60 names…[come] to his attention” every year. He didn’t specify, though, whether or not all of these names eventually get rejected.

The names above join previously rejected baby names such as Anal, Christ, Justice, King, Lucifer, Mafia No Fear, Messiah, Queen Victoria, Rogue, Senior Constable, and V8.

Source: When bad baby names go too far

Popular Baby Names in Moscow, 2014

According to Moscow’s civil registration office, the most popular baby names in Moscow in 2014 were Alexander (for the 10th year in a row) and Sofia.

Among the names registered for the first time last year were Byzantium, Jazz, and Sevastopol. (“Russia’s annexation of the Ukrainian port city of Sevastopol in March reinvigorated national pride among many Russians.”) Two other unusual names that made headlines last year were Lucifer and Olimpiyada (a baby girl born several weeks before the start of the Winter Olympic Games in Sochi).

I don’t believe Russia releases country-wide baby name rankings, but the Mercator media agency has gathered a some data (“the first names of 21 million residents of Moscow and the Moscow region”) and created a cool interactive baby name popularity graph covering the 20th century.

Some observations about the Mercator data:

  • Lada “became somewhat popular in 1968 when the Soviet Union began production of a car by the same name. The name debuted on the top-100 list at No. 70, then declined to No. 76 a year later before falling off the chart.” Lada was originally the name of a Slavic goddess.
  • Vladimir “was the second most popular name in 1952 when current President Vladimir Putin was born.”
  • Ninel “debuted on the chart at No. 66 in 1924, the year that Soviet state-founder Vladimir Lenin died. Ninel slid off the list in the mid-1930s.” (See more Revolutionary Russian Baby Names.)

Sources: Muscovites Embrace Avant-Garde Baby Names, Russian Couple Causes Outcry After Naming Baby ‘Lucifer’, Pre-Revolutionary Names Making a Comeback in Russia

Top 10 Rejected Baby Names in New Zealand

According to New Zealand’s Internal Affairs Department, a total of 350 baby names were rejected over the last ten years (July 1, 2001 to June 30, 2011).

The top 10 rejected names were these:

  1. Justice (49 rejections)
  2. Princess (24 rejections)
  3. King (21 rejections)
  4. Prince (20 rejections)
  5. Royal (12 rejections)
  6. Duke (7 rejections)
  7. Bishop (7 rejections)
  8. Major (6 rejections)
  9. J (6 rejections)
  10. Lucifer (6 rejections)

Other rejected names were Messiah, Christ, Saint, Mafia No Fear, Anal and V8. Also rejected were single letters, Roman numerals and punctuation marks.

What are the baby-naming rules in New Zealand? No baby names are explicitly off-limits, but there are three basic restrictions:

  • Names can’t be more than 100 characters long,
  • Names can’t be/include/resemble an official rank or title, and
  • Names shouldn’t be offensive to the general public.

Here are some past posts on baby names rejected in New Zealand, baby names approved in New Zealand, and babies getting gang names in New Zealand.

Source: List of rejected baby names released