How popular is the baby name Lucifer in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Lucifer and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Lucifer.

The graph will take a few seconds to load, thanks for your patience. (Don't worry, it shouldn't take nine months.) If it's taking too long, try reloading the page.

Popularity of the Baby Name Lucifer

Number of Babies Named Lucifer

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Lucifer

More Baby Names Banned in New Zealand

In 2011, New Zealand released a list of banned baby names. Names from that list have be circulating for years now, but I’d never seen any legit updates…until a few weeks ago.

Here are four baby names that were rejected by the NZ Department of Internal Affairs in 2015:

  • Commodore
  • Empress
  • Royahl
  • Superintedent

And here’s what the country’s Registrar-General had to say about intentionally misspelled names like Royahl:

“People will try it on, they will try to change a letter here or there and say it’s not an official title because it’s spelt differently. But if it sounds like an official title I won’t approve it, and that’s because potentially that child is going to end up perhaps in a court, and that name would be read out in court, and that would be inappropriate.”

He also noted that “about 60 names…[come] to his attention” every year. He didn’t specify, though, whether or not all of these names eventually get rejected.

The names above join previously rejected baby names such as Anal, Christ, Justice, King, Lucifer, Mafia No Fear, Messiah, Queen Victoria, Rogue, Senior Constable, and V8.

Source: When bad baby names go too far

Popular Baby Names in Moscow, 2014

According to Moscow’s civil registration office, the most popular baby names in Moscow in 2014 were Alexander (for the 10th year in a row) and Sofia.

Among the names registered for the first time last year were Byzantium, Jazz, and Sevastopol. (“Russia’s annexation of the Ukrainian port city of Sevastopol in March reinvigorated national pride among many Russians.”) Two other unusual names that made headlines last year were Lucifer and Olimpiyada (a baby girl born several weeks before the start of the Winter Olympic Games in Sochi).

I don’t believe Russia releases country-wide baby name rankings, but the Mercator media agency has gathered a some data (“the first names of 21 million residents of Moscow and the Moscow region”) and created a cool interactive baby name popularity graph covering the 20th century.

Some observations about the Mercator data:

  • Lada “became somewhat popular in 1968 when the Soviet Union began production of a car by the same name. The name debuted on the top-100 list at No. 70, then declined to No. 76 a year later before falling off the chart.” Lada was originally the name of a Slavic goddess.
  • Vladimir “was the second most popular name in 1952 when current President Vladimir Putin was born.”
  • Ninel “debuted on the chart at No. 66 in 1924, the year that Soviet state-founder Vladimir Lenin died. Ninel slid off the list in the mid-1930s.” (See more Revolutionary Russian Baby Names.)

Sources: Muscovites Embrace Avant-Garde Baby Names, Russian Couple Causes Outcry After Naming Baby ‘Lucifer’, Pre-Revolutionary Names Making a Comeback in Russia

Top 10 Rejected Baby Names in New Zealand

According to New Zealand’s Internal Affairs Department, a total of 350 baby names were rejected over the last ten years (July 1, 2001 to June 30, 2011).

The top 10 rejected names were these:

  1. Justice (49 rejections)
  2. Princess (24 rejections)
  3. King (21 rejections)
  4. Prince (20 rejections)
  5. Royal (12 rejections)
  6. Duke (7 rejections)
  7. Bishop (7 rejections)
  8. Major (6 rejections)
  9. J (6 rejections)
  10. Lucifer (6 rejections)

Other rejected names were Messiah, Christ, Saint, Mafia No Fear, Anal and V8. Also rejected were single letters, Roman numerals and punctuation marks.

What are the baby-naming rules in New Zealand? No baby names are explicitly off-limits, but there are three basic restrictions:

  • Names can’t be more than 100 characters long,
  • Names can’t be/include/resemble an official rank or title, and
  • Names shouldn’t be offensive to the general public.

Here are some past posts on baby names rejected in New Zealand, baby names approved in New Zealand, and babies getting gang names in New Zealand.

Source: List of rejected baby names released

Baby Names Banned in New Zealand

New Zealand recently released a list of 102 baby names that have been rejected over the last two years. I can’t give you the full list — I haven’t been able to track it down, even at the New Zealand government website — but here’s a partial list:

. (period)
* (asterisk)
/ (forward slash)

Source: Lucifer, Full Stop baby names rejected

Baby Names in the Catholic Church

Ever wonder about the Catholic church’s stance on baby names?

Here’s what the Catechism of the Catholic Church has to say about a baby’s baptismal name:

This can be the name of a saint, that is, of a disciple who has lived a life of exemplary fidelity to the Lord. The patron saint provides a model of charity; we are assured of his intercession. The “baptismal name” can also express a Christian mystery or Christian virtue.

Here’s more from the Code of Canon Law:

Parents, sponsors, and the pastor are to take care that a name foreign to Christian sensibility is not given.

Lucifer and Jezebel would be examples of names that are foreign to Christian sensibility.

And here’s something interesting from The Catholic Encyclopedia:

The priest is directed to see that obscene, fabulous, and ridiculous names, or those of heathen gods or of infidel men be not imposed. On the contrary the priest is to recommend the names of saints. This rubric is not a rigorous precept, but it is an instruction to the priest to do what he can in the matter. If parents are unreasonably obstinate, the priest may add a saint’s name to the one insisted upon.

That’s right–the priest may throw in another name, if he deems it necessary. (I’ve heard of this happening, but never witnessed it.)

Sources: CCC 2156, CIC 855, Ten Questions about Canon Law, The Catholic Encyclopedia