How popular is the baby name Lucy in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Lucy and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Lucy.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Lucy

Number of Babies Named Lucy

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Lucy

Popular Baby Names in Tasmania, 2016

According to data from the Tasmanian Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, the most popular baby names in Tasmania in 2016 were Charlotte and Oliver yet again.

Here are Tasmania’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Charlotte
2. Ava
3. Matilda
4. Isla
5. Grace
6. Evie
7. Lucy
8. Mia
9. Amelia
10. Sophie

Boy Names
1. Oliver
2. William
3. Charlie
4. Jack
5. Noah
6. Logan
7. James
8. Mason
9. Thomas
10. George

In the girls’ top 10, Isla, Evie, and Lucy replace Ella, Ruby, and Ivy.

In the boys’ top 10, Noah, Logan, Mason, and George replace Harrison, Oscar, Henry, and Lucas.

Here are Tasmania’s 2015 rankings, if you’d like to compare.

Source: Tasmanian Top Baby Names


The Baby Name “Topper”

topper, tv, 1950s
2 Ghosts & Cosmo Topper (R)
The baby name Topper popped up in the U.S. data for the first and only time in 1954:

  • 1955: unlisted
  • 1954: 5 baby boys named Topper [debut]
  • 1953: unlisted

Where did it come from?

The two-season TV show Topper, which aired on CBS from October of 1953 to mid-1955. Though it isn’t well remembered today, Topper was nominated for an Emmy Award for Best Situation Comedy in 1954 (it lost to I Love Lucy) and ranked the 24th in the Nielsen ratings during the 1954-55 season.

But the tale of Topper actually began three decades earlier, in the form of a book. The comic fantasy Topper (1926) was written by Thorne Smith, who the New York Times called “one of America’s most significant humor writers.”

The titular character, Cosmo Topper, is a “law-abiding, mild-mannered bank manager [who] decides to buy a secondhand car, only to find it haunted by the ghosts of its previous owners–the reckless, feckless, frivolous couple who met their untimely demise when the car careened into an oak tree.” The mischievous ghosts, named George and Marion, proceed to take Topper on series of adventures.

Smith followed the first book with a sequel, Topper Takes a Trip (1932).

His two books were eventually turned into three films: Topper (1937), Topper Takes a Trip (1938), and Topper Returns (1941). The first movie starred Cary Grant (as a ghost, not as Topper) and it later became the very first black-and-white motion picture to be digitally colorized (by Hal Roach Studios, in 1985).

There was also short-lived radio sitcom called The Adventures of Topper that aired in 1945, from June to September. In the radio show, Topper’s wife is named Malvena — I’ll bet this is what accounts for Malvena jumping back onto the charts one final time in 1946.

What are your thoughts on the baby name Topper? (Do you like it more or less than Tinker?)

Sources: Thorne Smith Profile – TCM, Topper by Thorne Smith — Goodreads

Popular Baby Names in Ireland, 2016

According to data released yesterday by Ireland’s Central Statistics Office (CSO), the most popular baby names in the country in 2016 were Emily and James.

Here are Ireland’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Emily, 490 baby girls
2. Grace, 452 (up from 8th to 2nd)
3. Ava, 388 (2-way tie)
4. Lucy, 388 (2-way tie)
5. Amelia, 369 (2-way tie)
6. Sophie, 369 (2-way tie)
7. Emma, 365 (down from 2nd to 7th)
8. Mia, 357
9. Hannah, 351 (new)
10. Lily, 334 (new)

Boy Names
1. James, 688 baby boys (new #1 name; replaces Jack)
2. Jack, 684
3. Daniel, 558 (2-way tie)
4. Conor, 558 (2-way tie)
5. Sean, 501
6. Noah, 446
7. Adam, 400
8. Oisin, 398 (new)
9. Michael, 394
10. Luke, 375

Some quick facts about the girl names…

  • Newbies to the top 10: Hannah, Lily
  • Newbies to the top 100: Aria, Harper, Heidi, Matilda, Willow, Zoey
  • Biggest increases within the top 100, by…
    • Ranking: Willow/Matilda (tied), Harper, Heidi, Zoey, Daisy
    • Raw number: Grace, Fiadh, Saoirse, Charlotte, Evie, Holly/Alice (tied)
  • Top girl names in Ireland’s five biggest cities: Amelia (Dublin and Cork), Ava (Limerick), Fiadh (Galway), Mia (Waterford)

And some quick facts about the boy names…

  • Newbie to the top 10: Oisin
  • Newbie to the top 100: Muhammad
  • Biggest increases within the top 100, by…
    • Ranking: Muhammad, Louis, Lucas, Josh/Jason (tied), Ollie
    • Raw number: Finn, Max, Jacob, Lucas, Oisin, Ollie, Rian
  • Top boy names in Ireland’s five biggest cities: James (Dublin), Charlie (Cork), Conor (Limerick), Michael (Galway), Daniel (Waterford)

Finally, here are the 2015 rankings for Ireland, the 2016 rankings for Northern Ireland, and some Irish name pronunciations.

Sources: Irish Babies’ Names 2016, Press Statement Irish Babies’ Names 2016

Popular Baby Names in Northern Ireland, 2016

According to data released on April 27 by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA), the most popular baby names in Northern Ireland in 2016 were Emily and James.

Here are the Northern Ireland’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Emily, 237 baby girls
2. Grace, 198
3. Olivia, 191
4. Anna, 164
5. Sophie, 155
6. Lily, 151
7. Amelia, 150
8. Ella, 142
9. Ava, 136
10. Sophia, 135

Boy Names
1. James, 254 baby boys
2. Jack, 243
3. Oliver, 207
4. Charlie, 204
5. Noah, 201
6. Harry, 188
7. Jacob, 173
8. Daniel, 159
9. Matthew, 142
10. Alfie, 139

In the girls’ top ten, Lily and Sophia replace Aoife and Lucy. In the boys’ top ten, Jacob and Alfie replace Thomas and Jake.

The top names in the Republic of Ireland in 2016 were also Emily and James.

Here are the 2015 rankings for Northern Ireland.

Source: Baby Names – NISRA

Early Recognition of the “Great-Grandparent Rule”

grandmotherA baby name becomes trendy for one generation. For the next two generations, while those initial babies are parent-aged and grandparent-aged, you can expect the name to go out of style. But during the third generation, once the cohort reaches great-grandparent age, the name is free to come back into fashion.

Evelyn is a name with a usage pattern that fits this description well.

I’ve seen it described elsewhere as the 100-Year Rule, but I prefer to call it the Great-Grandparent Rule, as it makes more sense to me to frame it in terms of generations.

Essentially, the pattern has to do with a name’s main generational association shifting from “a name that belongs to real-life old people” to “a name that sounds pleasantly old-fashioned.”

I used to think the pattern was one we’d only recently discovered — something we needed the data to see — but it turns out that at least one observant person noticed this trend and wrote about it in The San Francisco Call more than 100 years ago (boldface mine):

Time was — and that not very long ago — when old fashioned names, as old fashioned furniture, crockery and hand embroideries, were declared out of date. The progress of the ages that replaced the slower work of hand by the speed of machines cast a blight on everything that betokened age.

Spinning wheels were stowed away in attics, grandmothers’ gowns were tucked into cedar chests, old porcelain of plain design was replaced by more gaudy utensils and machine made and embroidered dresses and lingerie lined the closets where formerly only handwork was hung.

So with given names. Mary, Elizabeth, Jane, Sarah, Hannah and Anne, one and all, were declared old fashioned and were relegated to past ages to be succeeded by Gladys, Helen, Delphine, Gwendolyn, Geraldine and Lillian and a host of other more showy appellations.

Two generations of these, and woman exercised her time honored privilege and changed her mind.

She woke suddenly to the value of history, hustled from their hiding places the ancient robes and furnishings that were her insignia of culture, discarded the work of the modern machine for the finer output of her own fair hands, and, as a finishing touch, christened her children after their great-grandparents.

Old fashioned names revived with fervor and those once despised are now termed quaint and pretty and “quite the style, my dear.”

Pretty cool that this every-third-generation pattern was already an observable phenomenon three generations ago.

The article went on to list society babies with names like Barbara, Betsy, Bridget, Dorcas (“decidedly Puritan”), Dorothea, Frances, Henrietta, Jane, Josephine, Lucy, Margaret, Mary, Olivia, and Sarah (“much in vogue a century ago”).

Have you see the 100-Year Rule/Great-Grandparent Rule at play in your own family tree? If so, what was the name and what were the birth years?

Source: “Society” [Editorial]. San Francisco Call 17 Aug. 1913: 19.
Image: Frances Marie via Morguefile