How popular is the baby name Lulu in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Lulu.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Lulu


Posts that Mention the Name Lulu

Name Story: Anna May Wong

Anna May Wong photo

Chinese-American movie star Anna May Wong was born “Wong Liu Tsong” in Los Angeles in 1905.

Here’s what she had to say about her birth name in 1926:

I was named Wong Lew Song, which means Frosted Yellow Willows. A rather unusual name, isn’t it. Most Chinese children have names, which, interpreted into English, sound rather attractive, though they wouldn’t do for everyday use. They are all right in poetry, but I wouldn’t want to be called Frosted Yellow Willows by my acquaintances. It sounds altogether too quaint for a modern Chinese girl.

Here’s what she had to say about her American name and her stage name in 1928:

I was educated in Los Angeles. […] Our family did not live in the Chinese quarter but on Figueroa Street, where our neighbors were Americans and we were called by our English names. The doctor who brought me into the world named me ‘Anna’; my Chinese name is Tsong. When I was old enough to begin to think about a career, I added ‘May’ to ‘Anna,’ partly because we [daughters] all had four-letter names and I wanted to be different, and partly because it made a prettier signature.

(Her siblings’ American names were Lulu, James, Mary, Frank, Roger, and Richard.)

And, finally, here’s something funny I spotted in a newspaper about the 1924 movie Thief of Bagdad, which featured Wong:

The Mongol slave, a part that required emotional subtlety and balance, was played by Anna May Wong, a Chinese girl, educated in America. Her Chinese name is Lew Wong Song [sic], and means two yellow willows. When the picture was being filmed Miss Wong almost walked out on her job because an enthusiastic press agent misunderstood the translation of her name and published it as “two yelling widows.”

I saw several versions of this “two yelling widows” story, but never managed to track down the press agent’s original mis-translation.

Sources:

Rare Girl Names from Early Cinema: G

Looking for an uncommon girl name with a retro feel?

Here’s a list of rare female G-names associated with the earliest decades of cinema (1910s to 1940s).

I’ve included links to popularity graphs for the names that have seen enough usage to appear in the SSA data.

Gaby
Gaby Derilly was a character played by actress Josette Andriot in the short film The Green God (1913).

  • Usage of the baby name Gaby.

Gail
Gail Kane was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in Pennsylvania in 1887. Her birth name was Abigail Kane. Gail Patrick was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1930s. She was born in Alabama in 1911. Her birth name was Margaret LaVelle Fitzpatrick. Gail was also a character name in multiple films, including Dangerous (1935) and Woman Doctor (1939).

  • Usage of the baby name Gail.

Gaile
Gaile Warren was a character played by actress Ruth Robinson in the film An American Tragedy (1931).

  • Usage of the baby name Gaile.

Galatea
Galatea was a character name in multiple films, including Pygmalion and Galatea (short, 1912) and It’s a Cruel World (short, 1918).

Garda
Garda Sloane was a character played by various actresses (Florence Rice, Rosalind Russell, Ann Sothern) in various late-1930s mystery movies (Fast Company, Fast and Loose, Fast and Furious) written by Harry Kurnitz.

  • Usage of the baby name Garda.

Garla
Garla was a character played by actress Florine McKinney in the film Cynara (1932).

  • Usage of the baby name Garla.

Garnet
Garnet was a character name in multiple films, including Johnny Eager (1941) and So Goes My Love (1946).

  • Usage of the baby name Garnet.

Gavinia
Gavinia was a character played by actress Kate Davenport in the film Sentimental Tommy (1921).

Gaya
Gaya was a character played by actress Irene Wallace in the short film The Master of the Bengals (1915).

  • Usage of the baby name Gaya.

Gayle
Gayle Adams was a character played by actress Claudia Dell in the film What Becomes of the Children? (1936).

  • Usage of the baby name Gayle.

Gaza
Gaza was a character played by actress Carmen Phillips in the film A Cafe in Cairo (1924).

  • Usage of the baby name Gaza.

Gazella
Gazella Perkins was a character played by actress Helen Jerome Eddy in the film Girls Demand Excitement (1931).

Gee Gee
Gee Gee Graham was a character played by actress Iris Adrian in the film Lady of Burlesque (1943).

Genelle
Genelle was a character played by actress Betty Compson in the film The Green Temptation (1922).

Genesta
Genesta Slott was a character played by actress Sydney Fairbrother in the film All In (1936).

Genevia
Genevia was a character played by actress Nina Vanna in the film The Man Without Desire (1923).

Genevra
Genevra was a character name in multiple films, including The Talk of the Town (1918) and The Man from Brodney’s (1923).

Gentian
Gentian Tyrell was a character played by actress Gladys Franzin in the film Let Not Man Put Assunder (1924).

Genya
Genya Smetana was a character played by actress Pola Negri in the film Hi Diddle Diddle (1943).

  • Usage of the baby name Genya.

George-Anne
George-Anne Carleton was a character played by actress Janet Gaynor in the film The Young in Heart (1938).

Georgette
Georgette was a character name in multiple films, including A Husband’s Awakening (short, 1912) and So This Is Paris (1926).

Georgi
Georgi Gragore was a character played by actress Hedy Lamarr in the film I Take This Woman (1940).

  • Usage of the baby name Georgi.

Georgie
Georgie Hastings was a character played by actress Sally O’Neil in the film The Lovelorn (1927).

Georgine
Georgine was a character name in multiple films, including The French Doll (1923) and Play Girl (1932).

Gerda
Gerda Holmes was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s. She was born in Illinois in 1892. Gerda was also a character name in multiple films, including Three Sinners (1928) and Babies for Sale (1940).

  • Usage of the baby name Gerda.

Germaine
Germaine De Neel was an actress who appeared in films in the 1930s. She was born in Canada in 1911. Germaine was also a character name in multiple films, including Evening Clothes (1927) and The Great Garrick (1937).

Gerry
Gerry was a character name in multiple films, including Daring Danger (1932) and Tail Spin (1939).

  • Usage of the baby name Gerry.

Gerta
Gerta Klangi was a character played by actress Tala Birell in the film The Captain Hates the Sea (1934).

  • Usage of the baby name Gerta.

Gertie
Gertie was a character name in multiple films, including Lamplighter (1921) and Gold Dust Gertie (1931).

  • Usage of the baby name Gertie.

Gertrude
Gertrude McCoy was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in Georgia in 1890. Gertrude Robinson was an actress who appeared in films from the 1900s to the 1920s. She was born in New York in 1890. Gertrude was also a character name in multiple films, such as Coming-Out Party (1934).

Ghirlaine
Ghirlaine was a character played by actress Doris Kenyon in the film The Blonde Saint (1926).

Ghita
Ghita Galin was a character played by actress Alice Brady in the film Metropolitan (1935).

  • Usage of the baby name Ghita.

Ghula
Ghula was a character played by actress Dolly Larkin in the short film The Message of the Rose (1913).

Giacinta
Giacinta was a character played by actress Cissy Fitzgerald in the film Laugh, Clown, Laugh (1928).

Giannina
Giannina was a character played by actress Mary Pickford in the short film The Violin Maker of Cremona (1909).

Gigi
Gigi Perreau was an actress who appeared from the 1940s to the 2010s. She was born in France in 1941. Her birth name was Ghislaine Elizabeth Marie Thérèse Perreau-Saussine.

  • Usage of the baby name Gigi.

Gilberta
Gilberta Stanley was a character played by actress Lulu Bowers in the film The Matrimonial Martyr (1916).

Gilberte
Gilberte was a character name in multiple films, including A Hungry Heart (1917) and A Night of Mystery (1928).

Gilda
Gilda was a character name in multiple films, including Go Straight (1925) and Gilda (1946).

  • Usage of the baby name Gilda.

Ginette
Ginette was a character name in multiple films, including The Two Girls (1921) and A Kiss in a Taxi (1927).

Ginna
Ginna was a character played by actress Eve Arden in the film My Reputation (1946).

  • Usage of the baby name Ginna (which debuted in the data in 1947).

Ginny
Ginny Simms was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1950s. She was born in Texas in 1913. Her birth name was Virginia Ellen Simms. Ginny was also a character played by actress Luana Patten in the film Song of the South (1946).

  • Usage of the baby name Ginny.

Girda
Girda was a character name in multiple films, including Fool’s Paradise (1921) and The Girl in the Flat (1934).

Gita
Gita Carteret was a character played by actress Dorothy Mackaill in the film The Crystal Cup (1927).

  • Usage of the baby name Gita.

Giuditta
Giuditta Pasta was a character played by actress Benita Hume in the film The Divine Spark (1935).

Glad
Glad was a character played by various actresses (such as Mary Pickford and Jacqueline Logan) in various movies called The Dawn of a Tomorrow, all based on the novella of the same name by Frances Hodgson Burnett.

Glenda
Glenda Farrell was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1970s. She was born in Oklahoma in 1901. Glenda was also a character name in multiple films, including The White Parade (1934) and Down Argentine Way (1940).

  • Usage of the baby name Glenda.

Glenna
Glenna Marsh was a character played by actress Dorothy Revier in the film The Siren (1927).

  • Usage of the baby name Glenna.

Glenny
Glenny was a character played by actress Janet Sully in the film The Lure of Luxury (1918).

  • Usage of the baby name Glenny.

Glinda
Glinda was a character name in multiple films, including The Fairylogue and Radio-Plays (1908) and The Wizard of Oz (1939).

  • Usage of the baby name Glinda.

Glorian
Glorian Gray was an actress who appeared in films in the 1930s.

Gloriana
Gloriana was a character played by actress Zoe Rae in the film Gloriana (1916).

Glorietta
Glorietta Hope was a character played by actress Lucille Carlisle in the short film The Counter Jumper (1922).

Gloriette
Gloriette French was an actress who appeared in 1 film in 1931.

Godiva
Godiva was a character name in multiple films, including Lady Godiva (short, 1911) and The Story of the Blood Red Rose (short, 1914).

  • Usage of the baby name Godiva.

Gonda
Gonda was a character played by actress Belle Bennett in the film Ashes of Hope (1917).

Googie
Googie Withers was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1990s. She was born in British India (now Pakistan) in 1917. Her birth name was Georgette Lizette Withers.

Gora
Gora Dwight was a character played by actress Clarissa Selwynne in the film Black Oxen (1923).

Goytia
Goytia was a character played by actress Lottice Howell in the film In Gay Madrid (1930).

Granella
Granella was a character played by actress Malvina Longfellow in the film The Wandering Jew (1923).

Gratia
Gratia Latham was a character played by actress Pearl White in the film A Virgin Paradise (1921).

  • Usage of the baby name Gratia.

Grazia
Grazia was a character played by actress Evelyn Venable in the film Death Takes a Holiday (1934).

  • Usage of the baby name Grazia.

Gretna
Gretna Hillman was a character played by actress Sally Crute in the short film The Mystery of the Talking Wire (1914).

  • Usage of the baby name Gretna.

Griselda
Griselda was a character name in multiple films, including The Adventure Hunter (short, 1915) and Two-Faced Woman (1941).

Grizel
Grizel was a character name in multiple films, including Sentimental Tommy (1921) and Enchantment (1948).

  • Usage of the baby name Grizel.

Grizette
Grizette was a character played by actress Clara Bow in the film Kiss Me Again (1925).

Gudula
Gudula Rothschild was a character played by actress Helen Westley in the film The House of Rothschild (1934).

Guerda
Guerda Anthony was a character played by actress Constance Bennett in the film Wandering Fires (1925).

Guerita
Guerita was a character played by actress Barbara La Marr in the film Thy Name is Woman (1924).

Guillemette
Guillemette was a character played by actress Arlette Marchal in the film The Hen (1933).

Gulnar
Gulnar was a character played by actress Fanny Ferrari in the film Kismet (1920).

Gunhild
Gunhild was a character played by actress Seena Owen in the film A Yankee from the West (1915).

Guninana
Guninana was a character played by actress Steffi Duna in the film Man of Two Worlds (1934).

Gurtha
Gurtha was a character played by actress Hilda Vaughn in the film Banjo on My Knee (1936).

  • Usage of the baby name Gurtha.

Gussie
Gussie Bosley was a character played by actress Myrta Bonillas in the film The Custard Cup (1923).

  • Usage of the baby name Gussie.

Gusta
Gusta was a character played by actress Gwili Andre in the film A Woman’s Face (1941).

  • Usage of the baby name Gusta.

Gwendoline
Gwendoline was a character played by actress Beverly Bayne in the short film Love and Lavallieres (1913).

Gwennie
Gwennie Lyne was a character played by actress Julia Swayne Gordon in the film The Maelstrom (1917).

Gwenny
Gwenny Miller was a character played by actress June Lang in the film Too Many Women (1942).

Gwili
Gwili Andre was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1940s. She was born in Denmark in 1908. Her birth name was Gurli Andresen.

  • Usage of the baby name Gwili (which debuted the year Andre’s first film came out).

Gwyn
Gwyn Allen was a character played by actress Arline Judge in the film Smith of Minnesota (1942).

  • Usage of the baby name Gwyn.

Gwynne
Gwynne Evans was a character played by actress Leatrice Joy in the film Changing Husbands (1924).

  • Usage of the baby name Gwynne.

Gypsy
Gypsy Abbott was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s. She was born in Georgia in 1897. Gypsy Rose Lee was an actress who appeared in films in the 1930s to the 1960s. She was born in Washington in 1911. Her birth name was Rose Louise Hovick. Gypsy was also a character played by actress Evelyn Brent in the film Bowery Champs (1944).

  • Usage of the baby name Gypsy.

…Which of the above G-names do you like best?

Source: IMDb

More Top Baby Name Drops

A couple of weeks a go we checked out the list of top raw-number rises in the U.S. baby name data, so today let’s balance things out with the list of top raw-number drops.

Just remember that the SSA data doesn’t become very accurate until the mid-to-late 20th century, so many of the numbers below don’t reflect reality all that well.

Same format as usual: Girl names on the left, boy names on the right. Numbers represent single-year decreases in usage. From 1880 to 1881, for instance, usage of the girl name Mary dropped by 146 babies and usage of the boy name William dropped by 1,008 babies.

  • 1881: Mary, -146; William, -1,008
  • 1882: Lulu, -34; Garfield, -78
  • 1883: Mary, -136; William, -911
  • 1884: Mina, -33; Albert, -61
  • 1885: Sarah, -94; William, -853
  • 1886: Nancy, -35; Grover, -361
  • 1887: Minnie, -157; John, -916
  • 1888: Dorothea, -24; Rudolph, -17
  • 1889: Emma, -203; William, -933
  • 1890: Mollie, -53; William, -278
  • 1891: Mary, -375; John, -821
  • 1892: Jennie, -26; Enoch & Irving, -16 each (tie)
  • 1893: Mary, -390; John, -990
  • 1894: Ruth, -286; Grover, -171
  • 1895: Laura, -87; Charles, -155
  • 1896: Jessie, -197; John, -182
  • 1897: Anna, -431; John, -589
  • 1898: Sophie, -49; Hobart, -63
  • 1899: Mary, -1,234; William, -1,314
  • 1900: Manila, -24; Dewey, -154
  • 1901: Mary, -3,572; John, -2,931
  • 1902: Sophie, -45; Manuel, -32
  • 1903: Mary, -211; William, -305
  • 1904: Lillie, -121; Leo, -83
  • 1905: Florence, -94; Alton, -138
  • 1906: Minnie, -173; Theodore, -146
  • 1907: Bessie & Alice, -85 each (tie); Austin, -27
  • 1908: Evelyn, -178; Theodore, -69
  • 1909: Mae, -154; Ernest, -115
  • 1910: Allie, -35; Delmar & Bruce, -24 each (tie)
  • 1911: Annie, -220; Willie, -405
  • 1912: Dessie, -20; Lawyer & Blas, -12 each (tie)
  • 1913: Carrie, -62; Emerson, -28
  • 1914: Tomasa, -27; Woodrow, -547
  • 1915: Juana, -32; Kermit, -79
  • 1916: Mollie, -88; Willard, -476
  • 1917: Edna, -204; Woodrow, -239
  • 1918: Rose, -215; Frederick, -103
  • 1919: Helen, -2,447; John, -3,029
  • 1920: Sophie, -234; Woodrow, -1,033
  • 1921: Gertrude, -449; Willie, -391
  • 1922: Helen, -2,314; Warren, -3,315
  • 1923: Helen, -1,017; George, -321
  • 1924: Elizabeth, -512; Warren, -1,231
  • 1925: Mary, -2,910; John, -1,878
  • 1926: Mary, -2,773; William, -1,358
  • 1927: Helen, -1,582; William, -479
  • 1928: Mary, -3,756; William, -2,360
  • 1929: Mary, -3,361; John, -1,652
  • 1930: Ruth, -1,079; Herbert, -2,187
  • 1931: Dorothy, -3,884; John, -4,026
  • 1932: Betty, -1,688; Robert, -1,255
  • 1933: Mary, -4,381; Robert, -5,052
  • 1934: Dorothy, -761; Franklin, -1,209
  • 1935: Betty, -2,408; Franklin, -1,543
  • 1936: Shirley, -7,202; Donald, -1,025

(From the SSA: “Note that many people born before 1937 never applied for a Social Security card, so their names are not included in our data.”)

  • 1937: Shirley, -8,337; Donald, -771
  • 1938: Shirley, -3,048; Donald, -1,207
  • 1939: Shirley, -3,320; Robert, -2,630
  • 1940: Shirley, -2,573; Donald, -962
  • 1941: Betty, -1,172; Wendell, -533
  • 1942: Deanna, -408; Billy, -352
  • 1943: Carole, -1,900; Douglas, -3,001
  • 1944: Barbara, -4,242; Robert, -4,008
  • 1945: Mary, -3,184; James, -2,497
  • 1946: Victoria, -280; Victor, -492
    • Top 5 boy-name drops of ’46, in order: Victor, Truman, Franklin, Delano, Roosevelt/Homer (tie)
  • 1947: Carole, -793; Richard, -369
  • 1948: Patricia, -5,144; Richard, -7,570
  • 1949: Linda, -5,192; Ronald, -2,026
  • 1950: Linda, -10,549; John, -1,642
  • 1951: Linda, -6,553; Larry, -1,016
  • 1952: Linda, -6,808; Larry, -2,224
  • 1953: Linda, -5,819; Larry, -3,081
  • 1954: Linda, -5,884; Dennis, -2,860
  • 1955: Mary, -4,830; Gary, -3,499
  • 1956: Deborah, -4,476; David, -4,588
  • 1957: Deborah, -7,778; Gary, -2,286
  • 1958: Cynthia, -8,311; James, -5,502
  • 1959: Debra, -4,166; Michael, -5,209
  • 1960: Debra, -4,626; Richard, -3,619
  • 1961: Donna, -5,468; Richard, -2,432
  • 1962: Mary, -4,163; Mark, -4,234
  • 1963: Linda, -3,754; Mark, -4,150
  • 1964: Lori, -5,280; Mark, -4,073
  • 1965: Mary, -6,709; John, -10,972
  • 1966: Karen, -7,431; John, -6,519
  • 1967: Lisa, -4,483; James, -3,495
  • 1968: Mary, -3,592; David, -3,058
  • 1969: Lisa, -4,494; Timothy, -3,153
  • 1970: Lisa, -6,077; David, -1,953
  • 1971: Lisa, -6,053; David, -8,650
  • 1972: Lisa, -5,357; John, -8,340
  • 1973: Lisa, -4,883; David, -5,267
  • 1974: Lisa, -2,889; Robert, -1,681
  • 1975: Jennifer, -4,926; Brian, -3,864
  • 1976: Michelle, -3,116; Scott, -1,571
  • 1977: Amy, -4,613; Scott, -1,541
  • 1978: Amy, -3,509; Jason, -4,027
  • 1979: Kelly, -1,686; Kevin, -1,373
  • 1980: Melissa, -2,420; Jason, -2,203
  • 1981: Melissa, -3,623; Jason, -6,268
  • 1982: Brooke, -2,183; Jeremy, -2,643
  • 1983: Jennifer, -2,767; Jason, -5,512
  • 1984: Jennifer, -3,784; Jason, -5,167
  • 1985: Jennifer, -7,903; Jason, -3,905
  • 1986: Jennifer, -6,474; Joshua, -4,655
  • 1987: Jennifer, -3,483; Jason, -3,054
  • 1988: Ashley, -4,873; Jason, -3,441
  • 1989: Jennifer, -3,888; Jason, -3,292
  • 1990: Tiffany, -2,555; Adam, -2,216
  • 1991: Brittany, -7,446; Christopher, -5,219
  • 1992: Jessica, -5,047; Michael -6,409
  • 1993: Chelsea, -4,885; Michael, -4,821
  • 1994: Ashley, -4,571; Michael, -5,089
  • 1995: Jessica, -4,175; Michael, -3,060
  • 1996: Jessica, -3,752; Michael, -3,043
  • 1997: Jessica, -3,142; Cody, -2,660
  • 1998: Jessica, -2,816; Christopher, -2,104
  • 1999: Brittany, -1,903; Austin, -2,710
  • 2000: Brittany, -2,760; Austin, -4,824
  • 2001: Hannah, -2,366; Brandon, -2,445
  • 2002: Taylor, -2,220; Jacob, -1,968
  • 2003: Ashanti, -1,983; Austin, -2,850
  • 2004: Hannah, -2,034; Zachary, -1,832
  • 2005: Alexis, -1,503; Jacob, -2,059
  • 2006: Emily, -2,540; Ryan, -1,557
  • 2007: Emily, -2,050; Joshua, -1,664
  • 2008: Hannah, -3,738; Christopher, -2070
  • 2009: Emily, -2,084; Anthony, -2,099
  • 2010: Madison, -2,059; Joshua, -2,219
  • 2011: Isabella, -3,032; Jacob, -1,783
  • 2012: Chloe, -1,361; Jacob, -1,370
  • 2013: Isabella, -1,536; Ethan, -1,494
  • 2014: Sophia, -2,657; Jayden, -1,834
  • 2015: Isabella, -1,523; Jase, -1,459
  • 2016: Sophia, -1,311; Logan, -1,697
  • 2017: Sophia, -1,281; Mason, -1,728
  • 2018: Emily, -1,125; Matthew, -1,747

I’ve already written about some of the names above (click the links to see the posts) and will write about others in the future. In the meanwhile, feel free to beat me to it! Comment below with the backstory on the fall of Shirley in the late ’30s, Linda in the early ’50s, etc.

Name Quotes #64: Lulu, Lisa, Leisel, Tiahleigh

name quote, Lulu Alice Craig

From the 1900 book Glimpses of Sunshine and Shade in the Far North (which described Klondike Gold Rush stampeders camping at Lake Lindeman in British Columbia) by Lulu Alice Craig:

“[W]e wandered through this little city of tents of twelve to fifteen thousand people, finding interest in reading the names on the tents which represented many if not all parts of the world.”

(This quote was on display at the NPS museum in Skagway, Alaska.)

From an article about Lisa Brennan, Steve Jobs’s first daughter:

Lisa repeatedly tried to get [Steve] Jobs to tell her that the Lisa Macintosh computer was named after her but he refused to confirm it.

It was only when she was 27 and on holiday at a villa in the South of France owned by U2 singer Bono that Jobs finally came clean.

Over lunch Bono asked Jobs about the early years of Apple and whether or not he named the Lisa after his daughter. Jobs said: ‘Yeah, it was.’

Lisa was shocked and told Bono: ‘That’s the first time he’s said yes. Thank you for asking’.

From an article about athletes with strange middle names:

With a first name as iconic as Kobe Bryant’s, who needs a middle name with an interesting story? Well, Kobe Bryant does. His middle name — Bean — is a touching tribute to his father, Joe Bryant. Because of his high energy and ability to jump (guess Kobe must have inherited that particular skill), his father was nicknamed “Jellybean.” Luckily, Kobe’s parents didn’t go for the full candy-coated name and instead just dubbed him Kobe Bean Bryant.

From an article about Beatrix Potter finding character names via headstones:

The names for Beatrix Potter’s much-loved cast of animal characters may have come from ageing headstones.

Peter Rabbett, Jeremiah Fisher, Mr Nutkins, Mr Brock and Mr McGregor have all been found on stones at Brompton cemetery, west London, near where Miss Potter lived from 1863 to 1913. This seems to confirm local rumours that have circulated for years about the source of the names of her characters.

From an article about the name of Olympic swimmer Leisel Jones:

“Leisel was a very rare name when I was born in 1985… When I was born actually, my doctor said to my mum ‘you cannot call her Leisel because that’s not a name… You’re going to regret that one day,'” the Olympic swimmer said.

“And they absolutely did.”

The 32-year-old also went on to say having a unique name isn’t all it’s cracked up to be, especially when no one can spell it right.

“The only problem with my name is it’s spelt L-E-I-S-E-L — and everyone spells it wrong. Everyone spells it as L-I-E-S-E-L,” she said.

“So that is a bit painful, it’s a bit annoying. But I do love my name and I love that it’s different.”

From the 2003 book Exploring Twins: Towards a Social Analysis of Twinship by Elizabeth A. Stewart:

“[I]n such cultures as those of the UK and the US the implication of twinship in the broader realities of social structure is clearly indicated by the link between the ‘naming’ process for twins and class differences: higher socio-economic groups tend to choose more separate, less ‘twinsy’ names for their children, emphasizing values of and possibilities for individuation and autonomy, whereas the greater tendency for lower-class groups to actively emphasize and encourage unitary ‘twinness’, whether through naming, dress or referencing (as in the ‘twins’ as a social and linguistic unit) may well reflect values of familial solidarity and fewer opportunities for individual social advancement.”

From an article about the parenting approaches of Millennials vs. Gen Xers:

Millennial parents are picking baby names based on available domain names, a new study claims.

[…]

According to the research, as many as one in five millennial parents said they changed or seriously considered changing their baby’s name based on what domain names were free at the time.

From an article about the drama that ensued after a baby was named after murdered Australian girl Tiahleigh Palmer:

The grandmother of a new baby named after murdered schoolgirl Tiahleigh Palmer insists the name was meant as a tribute to the dead girl.

Tiahleigh’s furious mother Cyndi Uluave unleashed on a young couple whose baby was born last Friday, and named Tiahleigh, claiming it was disrespectful to use the name of her daughter who was killed in 2015.

[…]

‘Who names their baby after a dead girl? This wasn’t their name to use,’ she said.

(In response to “who names their baby after a dead girl”: JonBenet, Rainell, Roni Sue, Sherianne…)

According to Cyndi, she created the unique name “Tiahleigh” by combining the names Tiarna and Lee and then playing around with the spelling.

To see more quotes about names, check out the name quotes category.