How popular is the baby name Lyndon in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Lyndon.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Lyndon


Posts that Mention the Name Lyndon

Where did the baby name Trenny come from?

Trenny Robb, 1967
Trenny Robb, 1967

From 1968 to 1970, the baby name Trenny was popular enough to appear in the U.S. baby name data:

  • 1971: unlisted
  • 1970: 6 baby girls named Trenny
  • 1969: 7 baby girls named Trenny
  • 1968: 20 baby girls named Trenny [debut]
  • 1967: unlisted
  • 1966: unlisted

Where did “Trenny” come from?

A bridesmaid, believe it or not.

On December 9, 1967, Lynda Bird Johnson — the elder daughter* of President Lyndon B. Johnson and Claudia Alta “Lady Bird” Johnson — married U.S. Marine Corps Capt. Charles Robb in a private ceremony in the East Room of the White House.

One of the bridesmaids was the groom’s sister, a photogenic 20-year-old named Marguerite Trenholm “Trenny” Robb.

Interest in her spiked after the wedding photos came out, and she became somewhat of a media darling for the next few years. In 1968, for instance, Trenny appeared on The Merv Griffin Show and The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, she modeled in magazines like Ladies’ Home Journal and Mademoiselle, and she even flew to Rome to screen test for an Omar Sharif film.

The media followed her modeling career over the next couple of years — even after President Johnson was replaced by President Nixon in early 1969.

But then Trenny decided to leave it all behind and pursue other interests. In 1970 she married, moved to a farm in Vermont, and started a business making pot pipes and related paraphernalia (love beads, peace posters).

These days, Trenny is still in Vermont, but she’s moved on from making pipes to making lamps.

What are your thoughts on the baby name Trenny?

P.S. The English surname Trenholm comes from the name of a village in Yorkshire. The place name can be traced back to a pair of Old Norse words meaning “crane” (as in the bird) and “islet.”

Sources:

*Weirdly enough, the wedding of the younger Johnson daughter, Luci, also had an influence on the baby names…

Where did the baby name Bedar come from?

The unusual name Bedar has appeared just once in the U.S. baby name data:

  • 1968: unlisted
  • 1967: unlisted
  • 1966: 5 baby girls named Bedar [debut]
  • 1965: unlisted
  • 1964: unlisted

Where did it come from?

A flower girl. Specifically, 4-year-old “Bedar Howar” — the flower girl at the August wedding of 19-year-old Luci Johnson, daughter of U.S. president Lyndon B. Johnson.

bedar, bader, baby name, 1966

But here’s the catch: Her name was actually Bader Howar. Every contemporary write-up about the wedding that I saw managed to misspelled her name.

Her father Edmond was a real estate developer of Jordanian descent; her mother Barbara was a Washington D.C. socialite and writer. In the mid-1970s, Barbara mentioned to People magazine that Bader was “named for a paternal grandmother.” (Her name is a form of Badr, which means “full moon” in Arabic.)

Bader now works as a portrait photographer in California, though she did have a brief acting career (including a small part in Pretty in Pink).

Sources:

The Debut of Joselito

The baby name Joselito debuted in the U.S. baby name data in 1961.

The Spanish name Joselito first appeared in the U.S. baby name data in 1961:

  • 1967: 23 baby boys named Joselito (8 in NY)
  • 1966: 15 baby boys named Joselito
  • 1965: 14 baby boys named Joselito
  • 1964: 14 baby boys named Joselito (6 in NY)
  • 1963: 15 baby boys named Joselito (7 in NY)
  • 1962: 16 baby boys named Joselito (9 in NY)
  • 1961: 12 baby boys named Joselito [debut]
  • 1960: unlisted

Where did it come from?

A little boy with a lovely voice.

Spanish child star Joselito, known as “the little nightingale,” was born José Jiménez Fernández in Spain in 1943 (though the public was told that he was born years later than this). He starred in his first film in 1957, and followed that up with a string of successful movies and albums.

A few years into this career, he began crossing the Atlantic* — mainly to make movies in Mexico, but also to make several promotional appearances on U.S. television. Specifically, he performed on the The Ed Sullivan Show three times: in October of 1960, December of 1960, and January of 1961.

These TV appearances introduced American audiences to Joselito — and to his name — and no doubt brought about the debut of “Joselito” in the data.

Source: La ruina y el engaño que acabaron con Joselito

*During his time abroad, he met Fidel Castro, Ché Guevara, and Lyndon B. Johnson.

Five Name Friday: Boy name like Lawson, Fletcher

five name friday, boy name

It’s Five-Name Friday again! Here is today’s baby name request:

I need a boy name that isn’t popular (outside the top 500) but also isn’t weird. I like Lyndon, Lawson, Nelson, and Fletcher, but my husband isn’t enthusiastic about any of these.

Can you come up with five solid baby name suggestions for this person?

Here are the rules:

  • Be independent. Choose your five names before looking at anyone else’s comment.
  • Be sincere. Stick to legit recommendations you would offer a real-life friend.
  • Five names total in your comment. If you go over, I will delete the extras.

Which five baby names are you going to suggest?

Poll Results: Coolest Presidential Name is Lyndon

A total of 157 people voted in the Coolest Presidential Name poll. Here are the results:

I wasn’t too surprised that Lyndon and Ulysses claimed the top two spots. Lyndon, as Cathy points out, fits well with “today’s naming trends.” And Ulysses, as Camilla notes, might be appealing because it “isn’t a surname-as-first-name” like the other names on the list.

Next poll, coming up!

UPDATE, 11/2013: The first Presidential Name poll closed a long time ago, but I’ve just opened up a second one in the original post – go vote!