How popular is the baby name Mala in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Mala.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Mala


Posts that Mention the Name Mala

Name Quotes 76: Haechan, Frieda, Taz

From a Fodor’s article about the German gummy factory Haribo Fabrikverkauf:

At first glance it may seem like the milchbären (milk bears) are simply traditional German gummy bears with a milky jacket slapped on the back. However, not only are the flavors slightly different — including lemon, orange, cherry, strawberry, apple, and raspberry — but these bears have actual names. This fruity, creamy crew includes Emma, Emil, Anton, Mia, Ben, and Frieda.

From a Life article (Jan. 18, 1943) about actor and comedian Zero Mostel:

Back in 1941 Zero was a struggling New York painter who specialized in portraits of strong-muscled workmen. He went by the name of Sam, which was his own (“Zero” is a press agent’s inspiration). […] On Feb. 16, 1942, the day that news of the fall of Singapore reached the U.S., “Zero” Mostel made his professional debut as a night-club funny man.

From the Seattle Times obituary of Hildegarde:

Hildegarde, the “incomparable” cabaret singer whose career spanned almost seven decades and who was credited with starting the single-name vogue among entertainers, has died. She was 99.

From a Tribune India article about cyclone names:

Mala, Helen, Nargis and Nilofer may sound like the names of yesteryear Bollywood actors, but they are, in fact, lethal cyclones that have brought violent winds, heavy rain and wreaked destruction.

As Cyclone Fani pounded the Odisha coast on Friday, the name, which was suggested by Bangladesh, also evoked curiosity.

Mritunjay Mohapatra, the additional director general of the India Meteorological Department (IMD), said Fani, pronounced as ‘Foni’, means a snake’s hood.

From a Teen Vogue interview with Zendaya, who explains how her name is pronounced:

Zendaya decided to break it down for viewers with a simple step-by-step guide: “Zen is the first syllable, then day, and then a.”

“I think a lot of people see my name and think it’s more fancy than it is,” she explained. “They think Zendaya like papaya. It’s just day.

From a WWI-era New York Herald article (May 7, 1918) called “Six Get Permission to Change Names”:

Frederick Michael Knopp, an orchestra leader, disliked his Teutonic sounding name and permission was granted him to change it to Blondell.

Another German name was eliminated by the grave of Justice Guy, who permitted Leon Mendelson, a dental student, to call himself Leon Delson.

Believing that Malcolm Sumner sounded better than Malcolm Sundheimer, the latter applied for and received permission to assume the more euphonious name.

From an AP News article about a baby deer named after a K-pop star:

Fans of the K-pop group NCT 127 donated money in January to name a baby pudu at the Los Angeles Zoo after one of its members, Haechan (HECH’-ehn). This week, the human Haechan got to meet his namesake, snapping selfies with the little deer at his enclosure.

From a BBC article about the danger of female-voiced AI assistants:

AI-powered voice assistants with female voices are perpetuating harmful gender biases, according to a UN study.

These female helpers are portrayed as “obliging and eager to please”, reinforcing the idea that women are “subservient”, it finds.

Particularly worrying, it says, is how they often give “deflecting, lacklustre or apologetic responses” to insults.

From a write-up of Demi Moore‘s 2017 Tonight Show appearance:

“[Demi Lovato is] from Texas and I’m from New Mexico, so our families say our names the same but we each individually pronounce it differently,” Moore said, noting she pronounces it “Deh-mee” while Lovato says “Dem-ee.”

So what are the origins of Moore’s name?

“In my case, my mother just found it on a cosmetic carton,” she told Fallon. “It means ‘half,’ and she didn’t know that, but she just liked it.”

From a Wired article called “Pixar Reinvents Big Hair for Brave“:

So in 2009 Chung’s team designed a new simulator named Taz, after the wild Looney Tunes character. It forms individual coils [of hair] around computer-generated cylinders of varying lengths and diameters. The resulting locks stretch out when Merida runs but snap back into place as soon as she stops.

From the 2013 book Pretty in Ink: North American Women Cartoonists 1896–2013 by Trina Robbins:

[A] male pseudonym seemed to be required for action strips, starting with Caroline Sexton who, in 1934, signed “C. M. Sexton” to Luke and Duke. From Cecilia Paddock Munson, who often signed her work either “Pad” or “Paddock Munson,” to Ramona “Pat” Patenaude, to Dale Messick and Tarpe Mills, the women of the 1940s seemed to believe at least in part upon having a male name.

From a Scottish dad who recently named his son Lucifer:

“I looked it up. Our first child born four years ago was going to be called Lucifer but she was a girl so we called her Lucy.

“I wasn’t too sure about Lucifer but eventually said, ‘I want this name’. It would have been even better if he was born on Halloween.”

(I’m actually more concerned about the similarity of the sibset Lucy/Lucifer than about the repercussions of Lucifer itself. Is that weird?)

For more name-related quotes, check out the name quotes category.

Popular Baby Names in Sonoma County, CA, 2017

Sonoma_CountyAccording to the government of Sonoma, California, the most popular baby names in the county in 2017 were Mia and Mateo.

Here are Sonoma’s top 5 girl names and top 5 boy names of 2017:

Girl Names
1. Mia, 33 baby girls
2. Olivia, 32
3. Sophia, 26
4. Charlotte, 19
5. Scarlett, 17

Boy Names
1. Mateo, 34 baby boys
2. Oliver, 25
3. Julian, 23
4. William, 22
5. Sebastian, 21

And here are some of the baby names from the other end of the list. Each of these was bestowed just once in Sonoma in 2017:

Unique Girl Names Unique Boy Names
Azul Estrella, Bridget, Cardiff, Dottie, Ember, Florence, Gitselle, Hanen, Inii, Jazbel, Kova, Lennica, Mala Solara, Nelle, Opal, Pema, Rumi, Sabina, Tinsel, Vincere, Winslow, Yissel, Zahra Achilleon, Bremm, Cavendish, Dorsett, Elon, Fynn, Gradius, Hiroki, Ikaikaokalani, Jamokie, Kadessen, Larkin, Mazlo, Norrin, Onkar, Paul, Rhone, Suliano, Toby, Vyndel, Westley, Yoah, Zedrick

The top names in 2016 were Emma and Mateo.

Source: SoCo Data

Baby Name Needed – Non-Biblical, International Girl Name

A reader named Eric is expecting his first baby — a little girl — and he’d like some help coming up with a name. He writes:

We’re looking for something non-biblical, the more international the better, and should be no more than three syllables, preferably two. Front-runners are Daphne, Maya, and Clementine.

The baby’s surname will be either Gower or van der Plas.

Here’s what I came up with:

Bella
Camilla
Carla
Celia
Clara
Cora
Coral
Delia
Diana
Elena
Emily
Emma
Flora
Helen/Helena
Iris
Karina
Larisa
Laura/Lara
Leona
Lina
Lucina
Mala
Marina
Martina
Mina
Mona
Nina
Nora
Odessa
Regina
Rhea
Rita
Roma
Rosa
Sabina
Selena
Stella
Sylvia
Tara
Teresa
Tessa
Thea/Tea
Tina
Zara

I tried to focus on short, simple names that I thought would cross borders easily. I don’t believe any of the above are mentioned in the Bible (someone please correct me if I’m wrong).

Do you think any of these names sound particularly good with Gower and/or van der Plas? What other names would you suggest to Eric?

P.S. Eric’s blog looks delicious, doesn’t it?

Update: The baby is here! Scroll down to see what name Eric chose.

Baby Name Needed – English-friendly Swedish or Indian Name

A reader named Carin recently e-mailed me. She and her husband are expecting a baby in December, and they’d like help coming up with a name. Carin says:

We live in England, but I’m Swedish and my husband is of Indian background (born in England). We’d like to find a name that’s got Indian or Scandinavian background, but is still easy to pronounce in English. At the moment we’ve come up with Siri (Swedish) or Millie/Mili for a girl, and Alek or Sameer for boy. However, they don’t feel completely right! If you have any suggestions, I’d be very grateful!

I like that Carin and her husband are zeroing in on short, simple names. I think that makes a lot of sense in this case. Here are some similar suggestions:

Male Female
Emil
Erik
Henrik
Isak
Karl
Konrad
Kurt
Linus
Lukas
Oskar
Simon
Stellan
Viktor
Anand
Kamal
Kavi
Kumar
Mohan
Naveen
Nirav
Pranav
Rahul
Ravi
Rishi
Rohan
Saral
Anna
Emma
Elin
Sofia
Sara
Elina
Frida
Inga
Klara
Lina
Marta
Nora
Petra
Amala
Devi
Kala
Kamala
Leela
Mala
Maya
Mina
Mira
Neela
Priya
Seema
Tara

(For each gender, Swedish names are on the left and Indian names are on the right.)

What other names can you come up with?

Update, 6/03 – The baby girl is here! Check the comments to find out what her name is…

Huge List of Anagram Baby Names

anagram baby names

Looking for baby names with something in common? Perhaps for a set of twins or triplets? I’ve collected hundreds of anagram baby names for you.

2-Letter Anagram Baby Names

3-Letter Anagram Baby Names

4-Letter Anagram Baby Names

5-Letter Anagram Baby Names

6-Letter Anagram Baby Names

7-Letter Anagram Baby Names

8-Letter Anagram Baby Names

9-Letter Anagram Baby Names

10-Letter Anagram Baby Names

If you like the idea of anagrams but want to avoid sound-alike sets, I recommend anagrams with different numbers of syllables. Pairs like “Etta and Tate” and “Clay and Lacy” are a far more subtle than pairs like “Enzo and Zeno” and “Mary and Myra.”

(Here are some palindromic names from last month.)