How popular is the baby name Marina in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Marina and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Marina.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Marina

Number of Babies Named Marina

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Marina

Arrr! Baby Names for Talk Like a Pirate Day

pirate baby

Avast! Did you know that today is Talk Like a Pirate Day?

“Arrr” itself doesn’t make a great name — even for pirates — but here’s the next best thing: over 120 names that feature the “ar”-sound.

Araminta
Arcadia
Arden
Aretha
Aria
Arianna
Arlene
Arlette
Artemis
Barbara
Barbie
Carla
Carlene
Carley
Carmel
Carmella
Carmen
Charlene
Charlotte
Charmaine
Darcy
Daria
Darla
Darlene
Gardenia
Harbor
Harlow
Harmony
Hildegarde
Karla
Katarina
Larisa
Mara
Marcella
Marcia
Margaret
Margot, Margaux
Maria
Mariah
Mariana
Marie
Marina
Mariska
Marissa
Marjorie
Marla
Marlena
Marlene
Marley
Marnie
Marta
Martha
Marva
Martina
Narcissa
Parthenia
Pilar
Rosario
Scarlett
Skylar
Starla
Arcadio
Archer
Archibald
Archie
Ari
Arlo
Arnold
Arsenio
Arthur
Balthazar
Barnaby
Barton
Bernard (…Bernarr?)
Carl
Carlisle
Carlton
Carson
Carter
Carver
Charles
Clark
Dario
Darius
Darwin
Edgar
Edward
Finbar
Garfield
Gerard
Gunnar
Hardy
Harley
Harper
Harvey
Howard
Karl
Lars
Larson
Lazarus
Leonard
Marcel
Marcellus
Mario
Marius
Marc, Mark
Marcus, Markus
Marlow
Marshall
Martin
Marvin
Nazario
Oscar
Parker
Richard
Stewart, Stuart
Ward
Warner
Warren
Warrick
Willard
Yardley

Which of the “ar”-names above do you like best? Did I miss any good ones?

(Image from Pixabay)

Additions, 9/20:


9 Melbourne Siblings, All with M-Names

Putres and Nihal Yacoub of Melbourne, Australia, welcomed triplets in July. They now have a total of nine children, each with an M-name:

  • Michael, 12 years old
  • Marina, 10
  • Martin, 9
  • Marvin, 7
  • Martina, 6
  • Miguel, 4
  • Mario, 1 month
  • Mary, 1 month
  • Mina, 1 month

Nihal said that she and her husband (both originally from Iraq) stuck with M-names simply because they started with Michael and Marina “and then kept going.”

I find it very interesting that they chose both Martin and Martina and also both Michael and Miguel.

So let’s say Nihal were going to have a 10th baby and she wanted you to choose the name. What one boy name and one girl name would you suggest?

Source: Royal Women’s Hospital triplets brings Yacoub family to 11 (found via Voornamelijk)

Most Popular Baby Names in Armenia, 2012

The most popular baby names in Armenia were announced way back in February, then updated in May. (The numbers below are from the more recent press release.)

According to the National Statistical Service, the country’s top names were Davit for boys and Nare for girls.

Here are Armenia’s top 48 girl names and top 48 boy names of 2012:

Baby Girl Names Baby Boy Names
1. Nare, 967 baby girls
2. Milena, 852
3. Mari, 772
4. Mane, 729
5. Annie, 591
6. Anahit, 575
7. Elen, 543
8. Anna, 474
9. Mariam, 442
10. Maria, 410
11. Merry, 391
12. Angelina, 377
13. Gayane, 345
14. Eva, 299
15. Lilit, 294
16. Susanna, 288
17. Sona, 275
18. Hasmik, 258
19. Viktoria, 249
20. Gohar, 237
21. Nataly, 197
22. Karine, 191
23. Yana, 181
24. Sofi, 175
25. Karina, 156
26. Ruzanna, 155
27. Lusine, 152
28. Arevik, 145
29. Liana, 140
30. Anush, 139
31. Marianna, 134
32. Syuzanna, 133
33. Tamara, 122
34. Diana, 121
35. Marina, 116
36. Syuzi, 116
37. Armine, 113
38. Elina, 112
39. Vika, 103
40. Astghik, 102
41. Nane, 100
42. Narine, 99
43. Svetlana, 98
44. Lily, 96
45. Seda, 96
46. Sofya, 95
47. Monika, 95
48. Sara, 94
1. Davit, 1,313 baby boys
2. Narek, 1,144
3. Gor, 808
4. Hayk, 673
5. Alex, 600
6. Erik, 599
7. Tigran, 541
8. Arman, 529
9. Samvel, 490
10. Arthur, 451
11. Alen, 440
12. Armen, 428
13. Aram, 414
14. Ashot, 401
15. Aren, 348
16. Gevorg, 343
17. Areg, 328
18. Sargise, 322
19. Vahe, 302
20. Gagik, 302
21. Arsen, 300
22. Hovhannes, 283
23. Levon, 282
24. Artyom, 270
25. Karen, 263
26. Miqayel, 231
27. Robert, 205
28. Vardan, 181
29. Mher, 177
30. Harutyun, 172
31. Suren, 171
32. Garik, 164
33. Grigor, 157
34. Mark, 153
35. Daniel, 146
36. Hakob, 145
37. Aleksandr, 142
38. Edgar, 140
39. Andranik, 135
40. Hamlet, 135
41. Raphael, 134
42. Manvel, 133
43. Ruben, 133
44. Sergey, 129
45. Vahan, 107
46. Artak, 106
47. Albert, 105
48. Eduard, 104

Why didn’t they just go to 50? We shall never know…

Sources: Nare, David most popular baby names in Armenia in 2012, The most frequently given names to the new-borns by sex [pdf]

Name Quotes for the Weekend #10

From Baby Names Beyond Parody at The Awl:

We didn’t quite believe it when we saw this on Kate Day’s Twitter, but here it is, in the Independent. Biggles George Fittleworth Jackson-Kew. And his sister. Posie Betsy Winifred Jackson-Kew. Who have an older sister. Named Tuppence.

But of course, things are crazy in England. The paper also makes note of the marriage of Peter Wood and Kitty Fox, and please let them hyphenate their names. “Hello, Mrs. Kitty Wood-Fox!”

From a Telegraph article by a UK mom with kids named Croyde, Kiki and Trixie:

My middle child may not have got through that particular net. She’s called Kiki (that alliteration thing again). I was inspired by the linguistic fact that it’s impossible to say the ‘ee’ sound without the mouth turning up into a smile. Plus, I know a sassy, smart Kiki in her thirties so I asked for her advice. “I love it” she said, “Nobody ever forgets it. But in The Philippines it means vagina so my mum’s cleaner can’t look me in the eye.” That swung it for me. I like the idea of a stealthy vagina. And it will hopefully be a deterrent to island hopping in South East Asia when she should be going to university.

From a Globe and Mail article about the death of Rehtaeh Parsons:

Rehtaeh is “Heather” spelled backwards, a name her mother thought was pretty.

From Attempting to create original baby names has repercussions in The Australian:

McCrindle Research director Mark McCrindle said many parents were now “designing” rather than choosing names, often driven by phonetics.

But he warned it could lead to a lifetime of grief for children whose names are now attached to their digital profile.

“More than ever, people are saying, ‘it’s my child’s name, I am going to give it some difference’,” he said.

“But I think sometimes parents are being a bit short-sighted in the designing of their children’s names.”

From an article on names in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch:

“The Name Game” was a hit for Shirley Ellis in 1965. You know the song: “Shirley-Shirley-bo-burly, banana-fana-fo-furly, fee-fie-foe-murly … Shirley!” She bragged that “there isn’t any name that you can’t rhyme.” While entertaining soldiers in Vietnam, however, she discovered she couldn’t rhyme “Rich” or “Chuck.”

From a 5 Ways to Sabotage Your Baby Name Search at Upswing Baby Names:

While I don’t condone picking a name that is blatantly humorous, I would never disqualify a name just because it has remote teasing potential. For example, some parents will eliminate a name for rhyming with a funny word. But if you think long enough, you can find a funny word to rhyme with many names. Instead of trying to find the safest (most boring) name possible for your child, work on building their social skills instead.

From Betting on Baby in The Daily Beast:

Despite being a modern couple, Will and Kate are almost guaranteed to pluck a traditional moniker — like Mary, Victoria, or Elizabeth (a favorite) — from the royal bloodline, says author Phil Dampier, who has spent 27 years covering the royal family.

In mid-April, bets for the name Alexandra (Queen Elizabeth’s middle name) surged unexpectedly, causing house odds at William Hill to jump from 33/1 to 2/1. Other major betting firms also slashed their previously high odds. The profiles betting on Alexandra (new accounts, higher bets) led bookies to suspect an inside tip had leaked.

From an episode of The Mindy Project:

Mindy: “I want kids, four kids. Madison, Jayden, Bree and the little one’s Piper.”

Danny: “Are you kidding me with those names? You want a bunch of girls who work at the mall?”

From Parents Name Their Child Bane, Secure His Future Grudge Against Batman, Mumbling at The Mary Sue:

A couple from England have named their newborn baby boy, Bane. Yes, after the Batman villain last seen in The Dark Knight Rises. Rugby player Jamie Jones-Buchanan and wife Emma told The Sun they always agreed to give their children unusual names.

Oh yes, there’s more.

The couple have three other children. Two are named after Star Trek characters – Lore and Dacx [sic] – while the other is named after Highlander’s Kurgan.

From ‘Twas Ever Thus at British Baby Names:

In the late 18th and 19th century talk about names often bandied the phrase “romantic names” around. From all I can glean, it was used generally as a euphemism for any name considered slightly fanciful or outlandish, in much the same way “creative names” or “unique names” are used today.

[…]

The idea was, of course, also then picked up in essays and newspapers. Strangely, although we now tend to associate fanciful names with the aristocracy, it is the working classes who get the brunt of criticism in much of the commentary.

From British grandmother claims she was raised by monkeys at Today.com:

Marina Chapman’s book, “The Girl with No Name,” claims that she was raised by monkeys in the Colombian jungle for about five years of her childhood, adopting their behavior and eating the same food. Chapman claims that a group of capuchin monkeys became her surrogate family after she was kidnapped and abandoned in a Colombian jungle when she was 4 years old.

After living with the monkeys for several years, Chapman says she encountered hunters who tried to sell her into domestic slavery in the Colombian city of Cucuta. She then ran away and became a thieving street kid before being adopted by a loving family in Bogota as a teenager and giving herself the name Marina.

This reminds me of that isolated indigenous Brazilian man

And, finally, a bit about Quaker names from Albion’s Seed: Four British Folkways in America by David Hackett Fischer:

Delaware Quakers also differed from other English-speaking people in the descent of names from one generation to the next. Unlike New England Puritans, Quakers named their first-born children after grandparents. Unlike Virginia Anglicans, they were careful to honor maternal and paternal lines in an even-handed way.

[…]

These naming choices were not invented in the New World. They were virtually identical among Quakers in England’s North Midlands and America’s Delaware Valley. Through the eighteenth century, males received the same combination of biblical and teutonic names — with John, Thomas, William, Joseph and George the leading favorites among Friends on both sides of the water. Quaker females were mostly named Mary and Sarah in English and America, with Hannah, Anne, Elizabeth, Hester, Esther and Deborah strong secondary favorites. Plain English names such as Jane, and traditional Christian favorites such as Catherine and Margaret preserved their popularity among Quakers, more so than among Puritans. Also exceptionally popular among Quakers in England and America was the name of Phebe, which rarely appeared in Puritan and Anglican families.

Baby Name Needed for Sister of Diogo and Cruz

A reader named Debra would like some help naming baby número três:

We are just not finding THE name. I’m American, husband is Portuguese and we live in the states. We have two boys; Diogo and Cruz. I am due any day with #3 a GIRL. We definitely want a Portuguese name.

Our criteria…the name needs to be relatively easy for Americans to pronounce. Don’t want a name in the top 100 in the states. I prefer names that aren’t automatically shortened to nn – Debra to Debbie, Kimberly to Kim. I don’t usually care for names that end with the “e” sound, ex. Zoe. The name should be beautiful and sophisticated, more than cute.

I really like Sofia and Isabel, but they are just too popular in the U.S. right now. Other names we like are Beatriz (too hard to properly pronounce in US?), and Mara.

Please help us. I’d love to have a name before she is born! I’m 38 weeks today!

I think Mara would be a great choice, based on the criteria. Here are some other names that might also work:

Ana
Aurora
Carla
Clara
Flávia
Gloria
Lídia
Luísa
Magda
Marina
Marta
Monica
Paula
Rosa
Sílvia (good alternative to Sofia?)
Teresa

Do you like any of the above for the baby sister of Diogo and Cruz? What other (preferably Portuguese) names would you suggest to Debra?

BOH DVF 260602 – Rejected Russian Baby Name

In February of 2009, authorities in Moscow refused to issue a birth certificate to a seven-year-old boy whose parents, Vyacheslav Voronin and Marina Frolova, had named him BOH DVF 260602 (roughly). His name is an abbreviation that stands for “Biological Object Human, descendant of the Voronins and Frolovs, born on 26 June 2002.”

How is the name pronounced? The boy goes by the first section of the name, BOH, which sounds like “botch” in Russian.

Here’s what the boy’s father had to say about the name:

It will make his life easier, so he won’t interact with those idiots who think one’s name defines their appearance. Every person who gets a traditional name is automatically linked to his historical background. And he will be devoid of his ancestors’ legacy.

The main issue seems to be the inclusion of numbers. There are no baby name laws in Russia, but the registry office insists that a baby’s name must consist of letters only. (The office hasn’t challenged other recent baby names such as Aviation Dispatcher, Cool, Dolphin, Leaf Salad, Moon, North, Privatization, Russia, Simply a Hero, Wind, and Viagra.)

BOH DVF 260602’s parents have taken the case before several judicial bodies, but have had no luck so far. The European Court of Human Rights refused to hear the case. The parents don’t want to drop the numbers, but until the matter is settled their son will have no birth certificate, no insurance, and trouble enrolling in school.

Sources: Digit-named boy ignored by authorities (with video), Six-year-old with weird name refused birth certificate

Baby Name Needed – Girl Name for Twin Sister

A reader named Ayelet is expecting twins. She and her husband won’t be finding out the babies’ genders ahead of time, so they’d like to be prepared with two boy names and two girl names.

So far they’ve got August and Dominic for the boy names and Celia for one of the girl names. Once they select a second girl name they’ll be all set.

They’d like something that isn’t common (i.e. outside of the top 500). They’re considering Aliyah, Angelie, Aurelia, Eva, Isla, Juliet and Valentina, but Aliena is the current favorite:

The name we love is Aliena. She is a character in Ken Follett’s novel “The Pillars of the Earth,” which is set in twelfth-century England. But we can’t get past the “alien” in the name. I have an Alienor in my family tree, so I thought about going the Eleanor route, but I don’t like that spelling; I think I’m in love with that “Ali” sequence.

The baby’s surname will start and end with the letter n, like Nelson.

First, about Aliena. It’s a pretty name, but I’d also be worried about that “alien” association. I don’t know if I’d risk it as a first name, but it might work well as a middle.

The only alternative I can come up with is Eliana, which is an (unrelated) anagram of Aliena. But it’s ranked 193rd and climbing, so it might be a bit too popular.

Here are some other possibilities. None of these are currently in the top 500, and the ones with asterisks have a-l-i sequences.

Adina
Antonia
Amity
Adele/Adeline
Anneliese
Beatrice
Catalina*
Callista
Coralie*
Corinna
Davina
Estella
Elsa
Eloise
Esme
Flavia
Ginevra
Gwendolyn
Helena
Irina
Isadora
Judith/Judy
Leona
Lavinia
Marina
Martina
Mara
Olive
Oriana
Odette
Paulina
Regina
Rosalie*
Rosaline*
Theresa
Vera
Viola
Verity
Venetia
Zinnia

Finally, there’s the option of simply feminizing one of the boy names. August could become Augusta or Augustina; Dominic could become Dominique or Dominica.

Which of the above girl names do you like best with August, Dominic and/or Celia? What other girl names would you suggest to Ayelet?