How popular is the baby name Martin in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Martin.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Martin


Posts that Mention the Name Martin

Popular Baby Names in Spain, 2019

According to Spain’s Instituto Nacional de Estadistica, the most popular baby names in the country in 2019 were (again) Lucia and Hugo.

Here are Spain’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2019:

Girl Names

  1. Lucia, 3,621 baby girls
  2. Sofia, 3,505
  3. Martina, 3,172
  4. Maria, 3,165
  5. Julia, 2,600
  6. Paula, 2,498
  7. Emma, 2,362
  8. Daniela, 2,315
  9. Valeria, 2,248
  10. Alba, 2,097

Boy Names

  1. Hugo, 3,536 baby boys
  2. Martin, 3,256
  3. Lucas, 3,185
  4. Mateo, 3,160
  5. Leo, 2,960
  6. Daniel, 2,958
  7. Alejandro, 2,937
  8. Pablo, 2,868
  9. Manuel, 2,460
  10. Alvaro, 2,279

Both top 10 lists include the same 10 names as the year before, but in a different order.

The top names in the Basque Country specifically were Ane and Markel. (Ane is a form of Anna, whereas Markel comes from the Roman name Martialis.)

And did you know that Spain has two autonomous cities on the coast of Africa? They’re Melilla and Ceuta. The top names in Melilla were Amira/Nour (tie) and Mohamed, while the top names in Ceuta were Yasmin and Amir/Mohamed (tie).

Sources: First name of newborns – INEbase, Markel – Behind the Name

Name Quotes 84: Al, Gene, Sonatine

Welcome to the monthly quote post! There are a lot of celebrities in this one, so let’s start with…

Actor Emilio Estevez — who pronounces his surname ESS-teh-vez, instead of the Spanish way, ess-TEH-vezdiscussing his name [vid] on Talk Soup with Nessa in 2019:

So I was born on 203rd Street in South Bronx. And, at the time, my father had this very Hispanic-sounding last name. […] A lot people, a lot of these agents, and folks said, if you wanna work in this business, you gotta have a more Anglo-sounding name. Of course times have changed, but there was that moment where he was finally on Broadway — 1965, ’66 — and his father came from Dayton (he was from Spain, of course) and looked up on the marquee, and saw the three names that were starring in the play, and one of them was “Martin Sheen” and not his real name, Ramón Estévez. And my grandfather just looked up, and he just shook his head, and he was so disappointed. And my father saw that. And so when I began to get into this business, we had that conversation. And he said, don’t make the same mistake I did.

…A few sentences later, Estevez added:

I can’t tell you how many people have stopped me on the street and said, you know, just seeing your name on a poster, just seeing your name on screen, meant so much to me, you have no idea.

(Martin Sheen’s stage name was created from the names of CBS casting director Robert Dale Martin and televangelist archbishop Fulton J. Sheen.)

Singer Billy Idol, born William Broad, discussing his stage name [vid] with Karyn Hay on the New Zealand TV show Radio with Pictures in 1984:

Q: Why did you choose the name Billy Idol, especially in a time when [there’s] Johnny Rotten, Ret Scabies, you know?

A: Exactly, I mean that’s the point. That’s exactly the point. […] I thought, first of all, of course, of I-D-L-E, you know, idle. Cause this chemistry teacher when I was at school — I got 8 out of 100 for chemistry, I hated chemistry — so he wrote, “William is idle,” right? And I thought that was great to get 8 out of 10 [sic] for chemistry, cause I hated the hell out of it. So I thought that was respectable, so I thought it was worthwhile being called I-D-O-L, idol. Also, it’s good fun making fun of show business. I’m not into show business, I’m into rock ‘n’ roll.

Composer Bear McCreary’s baby name announcement from mid-2014:

Raya and I are proud to announce our greatest collaboration is finally here. 

Sonatine Yarbrough McCreary was born 6/2/14 and is filling our lives with joy, music… and poop.

(The musical term sonatina means “small sonata” in Italian. A sonata refers to a piece that is played — as opposed to a cantata, a piece that is sung.)

From an article about Amy Schumer legally changing her son’s name:

The I Feel Pretty star revealed her decision to change her 11-month-old son’s name on the newest episode of her podcast 3 Girls, 1 Keith on Tuesday. Schumer and her husband Chris Fischer named their first child Gene Attell Fischer, born May 5, with his middle name serving as a tribute to their good friend comic Dave Attell.

“Do you guys know that Gene, our baby’s name, is officially changed? It’s now Gene David Fischer. It was Gene Attell Fischer, but we realized that we, by accident, named our son ‘genital,'” Schumer told cohosts Rachel Feinstein, Bridget Everett, and Keith Robinson.

…More to the point, from Amy’s Instagram:

Oh, like you never named your kid Genital fissure!!!!!!!

Three quotes from a fantastic article in the NYT about Weird Al Yankovic (discovered via Nancy Friedman).

…On his Alfred-ness:

Although Alfred’s grades were perfect, and he could solve any math problem you threw at him, his social life was agonizing. Imagine every nerd cliche: He was scrawny, pale, unathletic, nearsighted, awkward with girls — and his name was Alfred. And that’s all before you even factor in the accordion.

…On how his surname turned him into an accordion player:

[The accordion] came from a door-to-door salesman. The man was offering the gift of music, and he gave the Yankovics a simple choice: accordion or guitar. This was 1966, the golden age of rock, the year of the Beatles’ “Revolver” and the Beach Boys’ “Pet Sounds” and Bob Dylan’s “Blonde on Blonde.” A guitar was like a magic amulet spraying sexual psychedelic magic all over the world. So Yankovic’s mother chose the accordion. This was at least partly because of coincidence: Frankie Yankovic, a world-famous polka player, happened to share the family’s last name. No relation. Just a wonderful coincidence that would help to define Alfred’s entire life.

…On his Alfred-ness again:

The nickname “Weird Al” started as an insult. It happened during his first year of college. This was a fresh start for Alfred — a chance to reinvent himself for a whole new set of people. He had no reputation to live down, no epic humiliations. And so he decided to implement a rebrand: He introduced himself to everyone not as Alfred but as “Al.” Alfred sounded like the kind of kid who might invent his own math problems for fun. Al sounded like the opposite of that: a guy who would hang out with the dudes, eating pizza, casually noodling on an electric guitar, tossing off jokes so unexpectedly hilarious they would send streams of light beer rocketing out of everyone’s noses.

The problem was that, even at college, even under the alias of Al, Yankovic was still himself. He was still, fundamentally, an Alfred.

Comedian Kevin Hart on choosing baby names:

I wish I could say that I am the main guru, [but] I am awful when it comes to the names. That is not my expertise. […] I say the same thing every time. It’s either Kevin or Kevina. I got two names. That’s it. So if you never go with either one of those then I’m no good to you.

For more name-related quotes, check out the name quotes category.

Popular Baby Names in Estonia, 2019

According to Eesti Rahvusringhääling (Estonian Public Broadcasting), the most popular baby names in Estonia in 2019 were Mia and Robin.

Here are the country’s top 10 girl names and top 11 boy names of 2019:

Girl Names

  1. Mia
  2. Sofia
  3. Emily
  4. Lenna
  5. Marta
  6. Hanna
  7. Alice
  8. Elise
  9. Maria
  10. Saskia

Boy Names

  1. Robin
  2. Sebastian
  3. Hugo
  4. Oliver
  5. Mattias
  6. Rasmus
  7. Kristofer
  8. Mark
  9. Oskar
  10. Martin
  11. Robert

The last set of rankings I posted for Estonia was the 2014 rankings, which had Sofia and Rasmus at the top.

Source: Robin and Mia most popular baby names in 2019

The Height of Coretta

Coretta Scott King © 1969 LIFE

The baby name Coretta was the fastest-rising baby name of 1968:

  • 1970: 146 baby girls named Coretta
  • 1969: 194 baby girls named Coretta
  • 1968: 336 baby girls named Coretta
  • 1967: 13 baby girls named Coretta
  • 1966: 16 baby girls named Coretta

The name also saw it’s highest-ever usage that year, as did the variant spelling Corretta. And another spelling, Koretta, appeared for the very first time in the data in 1968.

What was bringing all this attention to the baby name Coretta in 1968?

Coretta Scott King. She was the wife of civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr., until his assassination on April 4, 1968, in Memphis, Tennessee. This event put Coretta and her children (Yolanda, Martin, Dexter, and Bernice*) in the national spotlight.

Not long after the death of her husband, Coretta took Martin’s place as a leader of the Civil Rights Movement. She was instrumental in establishing the national holiday Martin Luther King, Jr. Day — which happens to be today.

Coretta Scott King was named in honor of her paternal grandmother, Cora. The name Cora is a Latinized form of the ancient Greek name Kore (“maiden”), one of the epithets of the goddess Persephone.

*Usage of the names Yolanda and Dexter increased markedly in 1968. The usage of Martin, which had been declining, saw an uptick that year. (Peak usage was in 1963, the year of MLK’s legendary “I have a dream” speech.) The usage of Bernice was seemingly unaffected by the assassination.

Incidentally, in her 1969 book My Life with Martin Luther King, Jr., Coretta Scott King talked about the naming of her daughters Yolanda (nicknamed Yoki) and Bernice:

I chose the name Yolanda Denise, but my husband had reservations about it. He questioned whether people would call her Yolanda or would mispronounce the name. He was right. Her name is so frequently mispronounced that it bothered her when she was growing up.

There is a tendency among middle-class African Americans to give their children unusual names. Perhaps they are seeking elegance or some special identification. I fell victim to this custom, rather than following the sensible practice of naming the baby after a member of the family. Later Martin said, “If we ever have another baby girl, I’m going to give her a simple name like Mary Jane.”

When we did have another daughter, we called her Bernice Albertine, after her two grandmothers. Her name was not quite Mary Jane, but at least she was named for members of the family.

Sources: Coretta Scott King – Wikipedia, Cora – Behind the Name

Popular Baby Names in Spain, 2018

According to Spain’s Instituto Nacional de Estadistica, the most popular baby names in the country in 2018 were Lucia and Hugo.

Here are Spain’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2018:

Girl Names

  1. Lucia, 4,004 baby girls
  2. Sofia, 3,701
  3. Martina, 3,534
  4. Maria, 3,533
  5. Paula, 2,847
  6. Julia, 2,738
  7. Emma, 2,623
  8. Valeria, 2,520
  9. Daniela, 2,503
  10. Alba, 2,350

Boy Names

  1. Hugo, 3,800 baby boys
  2. Lucas, 3,617
  3. Martin, 3,332
  4. Daniel, 3,223
  5. Pablo, 3,139
  6. Mateo, 3,100
  7. Alejandro, 3,000
  8. Leo, 2,651
  9. Alvaro, 2,495
  10. Manuel, 2,476

In the boys’ top 10, Leo replaces Adrian.

The girls’ top 10 includes the same names, but in a different order.

In 2017, the top names were Lucia and Lucas.

Source: What is the frequency of a first name of newborns? – INEbase