How popular is the baby name Mila in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Mila.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Mila


Posts that Mention the Name Mila

How do you like your name, Emilia?

Time for another name interview! Today’s interview is with a 23-year-old from northern Poland named Emilia. Notably, her name at birth wasn’t Emilia, but one of the Polish forms of the name Margaret. Her middle name is Anna.

What’s the story behind her name?

As for my birth name, my Mum’s high school best friend was called my birth name, and they both promised each other that if any of them will have a daughter, she will call her the other’s name. At the same time, it was also my maternal aunt’s name. The friendship was pretty much gone by the time my Mum had me, but she kept the promise anyway.

My middle name Anna is my Mum’s first name – my Dad is Kashub and there is a tradition Kashubs have that a parent’s first name is the child’s middle name.

As for my current, legal name, I chose it mostly just because I’ve always loved Emilia, always felt like an Emilia, this name has strangely always resonated with me very much and I wanted to be an Emilia. Later on, as a teen, I read Emily of New Moon (whose name is Emilia/Emilka in the Polish translation) by L. M. Montgomery, and I found the character of Emily very relatable, felt a strong bond with her. I also learned that, coincidentally, when I was born, my gran had apparently suggested the name Emilia to my parents, which was a huge surprise to me, because – based on her offspring’s names – I would have never thought she could like Emilia. I was called Emilia by people I was close with since childhood, and I hated my birth name (perhaps not in general as a name but I hated it on myself) so it felt like the only natural thing to do – to change my name to Emilia.

What does she like most about her name?

I love the sound of Emilia. I like its softness, how girly it is, the general feel of it. I just feel a strong connection with it. I don’t know closely any other Emilia so that’s a plus too. I like the Emily of New Moon association, as well as that it travels well between different languages and is pronounced pretty much the same in each of them. I like how people always say it fits me, it confirms my great naming skills, lol. And there’s such a wide array of nicknames. Most of which I really do like. I am called Emi, Emilka, Emisia, Emis*, Emisha, Emiszon, Mila, Milka, Emilianna by Poles. Anglophone people usually just call me Emilia but sometimes I am also Emi or Emmie for them, and one person calls me Milzie which is so funny and adorable. A Finnish family I once knew called me Milla.

I like the classicness and classiness of my middle name and the connection to my Mum, and its huge feminine potential.

As a Catholic, the only thing I truly like about my birth name is my patron saint – Bl. Margherita of Castello.

[*The name “Emis” should have an acute accent over the s.]

What does she like least about her name?

I despise the nickname Emila. It’s just one letter’s difference but somehow it’s huge, and I don’t seem to be the only one for whom it makes a difference. Emila conveys a completely different feel to me than Emilia and has much less character, feels kind of shallow and superficial. But not too many people call me Emila and somehow it’s less embarrassing for me to ask people not to call me Emila than it was with my birth name to ask people not to call me my most despised nickname, perhaps because I chose Emilia, so I get to decide what I want to go by. It can get a little annoying when anglo-folks spell my name Amelia over and over (though I can’t blame people as they’re pronounced so similarly in English), but it’s not a huge deal as Amelia is a beautiful name as well. It bugs me a little that it’s very trendy currently for babies over here, but I can well understand why.

About Anna I dislike how popular it is both as a first and middle name, but since it’s only my middle name it’s not a big problem. I also have kind of mixed feelings about that both my sister and me have the same middle, don’t think it was particularly creative of our parents, and my sister isn’t impressed by it either, but on the other hand it’s a nice family connection, especially that, just as I said, Anna is so beautiful and after all neither of us can seriously imagine being named any other middle name.

As for my birth name, what I most disliked about it is that it just never felt like me. It’s not a bad name itself, it’s just not me. Can’t explain it better. Also, being blind, I had trouble during family gatherings when I felt confused whether people were talking to me or my namesake aunt. I cringed at all the nicknames. Another source of confusion was that my and my sister’s casual nicknames rhymed, so when someone called us from a distance, no one knew for sure, which one of us was being called. And, while it’s a pretty classic name, it generally has a bit of a dated feel, so the vast majority of namesakes I encountered were ladies born in the 60’s.

Finally, would Emilia recommend that her name be given to babies today?

Yep. As much as I don’t like the huge popularity of Emilia among baby girls, as I said I can understand it well. I think it has a lot of traits that a lot of parents are after in a baby name these days, at least here, but I guess in the English-speaking world too. It’s elegant, feminine, sophisticated, but sweet and with a lot of nicknames, and is international. And in the English-speaking world – a nice and still not that overwhelmingly popular alternative to trendy Amelia and Emma, and SO very common Emily.

Thank you so much, Emilia, for being so thorough!

[Would you like to tell me about your name?]

P.S. A week ago, the SSA released the latest U.S. baby name data, and we learned that Emilia was in fact one of the fastest-rising girl names of 2019!

Popular Baby Names in Switzerland, 2019

According to data from the Swiss Federal Statistical Office (FSO), the most popular baby names in Switzerland in 2019 were Mia and Liam.

Here are the country’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2019:

Girl Names

  1. Mia, 434 baby girls
  2. Emma, 401
  3. Sofia, 341
  4. Lara, 312
  5. Emilia, 310
  6. Mila, 298
  7. Lina, 294
  8. Lia, 292
  9. Lena, 280
  10. Anna, 276

Boy Names

  1. Liam, 443 baby boys
  2. Noah, 437
  3. Matteo, 360
  4. Gabriel, 340
  5. Luca, 336
  6. Leon, 318
  7. Elias, 314
  8. Louis, 312
  9. David, 264
  10. Samuel, 252

In the girls’ top 10, Lara, Lina and Lia replace Lea, Elena and Laura.

In the boys’ top 10, Samuel replaces Ben.

Here are the top baby names within each of Switzerland’s main language groups:

  • German speakers (63% of the population): Mia and Noah
  • French speakers (23%): Emma and Liam
  • Italian speakers (8%): Sofia and Leonardo
  • Romansh speakers (under 1%): Lina and Elia/Finn/Luca (3-way tie)

In 2018, the top names in the country overall were Emma and Liam.

Sources: Vornamen der Neugeborenen, Revealed: Switzerland’s most popular baby names, Mia, Emma, Liam, Noah: the most popular baby names of 2019

U.S. Girl Names 2019: Popular, Rising, Falling, Debuts

Name nerds rejoice! Finally, four months after Mother’s Day, the U.S. Social Security Administration has decided to release the latest batch (2019) of baby name data!

First off, here’s the link to the SSA’s popular names page and to the SSA’s downloadable data page.

I’m going to summarize the data in just two posts this year — one for girls, one for boys. Let’s start with the ladies…

Here are the most popular girl names overall:

  1. Olivia, 18,451 baby girls
  2. Emma, 17,102
  3. Ava, 14,440
  4. Sophia, 13,714
  5. Isabella, 13,306
  6. Charlotte, 13,138
  7. Amelia, 12,862
  8. Mia, 12,414
  9. Harper, 10,442
  10. Evelyn, 10,392

These same ten names were in the 2018 top ten as well.

The girl names that saw the largest increases in usage in terms of absolute numbers of babies were…

  1. Alaia, increased by 1,072 babies
  2. Everleigh, 1,054
  3. Luna, 838
  4. Emilia, 716
  5. Willow, 653
  6. Isla, 615
  7. Violet, 570
  8. Amelia, 508
  9. Hazel, 493
  10. Arya, 492

The girl names that saw the largest increases in usage in terms of relative numbers of babies were…

  1. Yalitza, increased by 1490%
  2. Alita, 554%
  3. Dayleen, 527%
  4. Jenaiah, 450%
  5. Amiri, 417%
  6. Theo, 343%
  7. Mazikeen, 319%
  8. Kamoura, 317%
  9. Seylah, 317%
  10. Kairo, 283%

Yalitza was no doubt influenced by Roma (2018) actress Yalitza Aparicio, and Mazikeen comes from the character Mazikeen Smith in the TV series Lucifer.

Here are the girl names that debuted most impressively in the 2019 data:

  1. Adeya, debuted with 22 baby girls
  2. Kayslin, 20
  3. Malaynah, 18
  4. Chevel, 17
  5. Kulture, 17
  6. Kaavia, 15
  7. Sakani, 15
  8. Ahveya, 14
  9. Akyli, 14
  10. Jhazelle, 14

Some explanations…

  • Adeya, Kulture and Kaavia are all celebrity babies: Adeya is the daughter of Kehlani, Kulture is the daughter of Cardi B and Offset, and Kaavia is the daughter of Gabrielle Union and Dwyane Wade.
  • Kayslin and Chevel come from two contestants (Kayslin Victoria and Chevel Shepherd) on The Voice.
  • Malaynah is a young female rapper (who earned a coveted IG repost from the aforementioned Cardi B in 2018).
  • Sakani was likely inspired by Sekani, the name of a character (a little boy) in the 2018 film The Hate U Give.
  • Akyli must come from Akyli Maze, one of the children of Joe Lee and Alena Maze — YouTube influencers who create content under the name MAZELEE. (The baby name Mazelee debuted last year as well — not surprising at all, given how close it is to the popular Paisley.)

The girl names that saw the largest decreases in usage in terms of absolute numbers of babies were…

  1. Emma, decreased by 1,655 babies
  2. Isabella, -1,211
  3. Alexa, -1,069
  4. Mila, -845
  5. Madison, -794
  6. Avery, -775
  7. Victoria, -767
  8. Addison, -743
  9. Abigail, -742
  10. Elizabeth, -716

The girl name that saw the largest decrease in usage in terms of relative numbers of babies was Anifer (-86%), and the girl name that saw the steepest drop off the list was Marionna (from 21 babies in 2018 to fewer than 5 in 2019).

If you can explain any of the rises (or drops), please leave a comment!

Update, 9/6/2020: Here are the boy names!

Popular Baby Names in the Netherlands, 2019

According to the Netherlands’ Sociale Verzekeringsbank (SVB), the most popular baby names in the country in 2019 were Emma and Noah.

Here are the Netherlands’ top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2019:

Girl Names (“Meisjesnamen”)

  1. Emma, 731 baby girls
  2. Mila, 671
  3. Sophie, 645
  4. Zoë, 644
  5. Julia, 630
  6. Tess, 596
  7. Sara, 593
  8. Anna, 586
  9. Evi, 530
  10. Saar, 516

Boy Names (“Jongensnamen”)

  1. Noah, 785 baby boys
  2. Daan, 717
  3. Lucas, 672
  4. Levi, 654
  5. Sem, 624
  6. Finn, 596
  7. Liam, 583
  8. James, 576
  9. Milan, 541
  10. Luuk, 533

In the girls’ top 10, Evi and Saar (a short form of Sarah) replace Eva and Noor/Nora.

In the boys’ top 10, Liam and James replace Bram and Mees.

In 2018, the top two names were Julia and Lucas.

Sources: De populairste meisjesnamen van 2019, De populairste jongensnamen van 2019

Name Quotes 81: Anne, Wendy, Charlie

It’s a new month — time for a new batch of name-related quotations!

From a write-up about Ryan Reynolds’ appearance on the Today show in mid-December:

After Hoda asked how he and Blake came up with the name of their third (a clever way to get the actor to publicly confirm what the name actually is), Reynolds quipped, “We haven’t yet! We’re gonna be original, and all the letters in her name are silent.” […] He continued, “I want to give her something to push against in life.”

From an article about the science of baby name trends (thank you, Uly!):

You can even see how the zeitgeist of the age affected American’s [sic] desire for novelty. As Matthew W. Hahn and Alexander Bentley found, the incidence of new, unusual names rose in the 20s, peaked around 1930, but then plummeted in the 40s and 50s. Then it shot up again in the 60s, before reversing and plummeting again in the late 70s. Why? If you wanted to engage in some armchair zeitgeist analysis, you could argue that this makes a crude sort of cultural sense: The “roaring 20s” and the 60s were both periods when significant subsets of the population treasured creative, rule-breaking behavior; the 50s and early 80s weren’t.

From an article announcing the cancellation of a TV series with a name-referencing title:

The Netflix and CBC drama Anne With an E, adapted from Lucy Maud Montgomery’s beloved Anne of Green Gables, has been cancelled after three seasons.

From an article about the weirdly common celebrity baby name Charlie Wolf:

Celebrity moms and dads are going wild for the animal-inspired baby name Charlie Wolf.

Zooey Deschanel and her estranged husband, Jacob Pechenik, kicked off the trendy moniker when they welcomed their baby boy in 2017.

[…]

Lauren Conrad and William Tell welcomed their second little one in October 2019 — and named him Charlie Wolf as well.

[…]

The following month, another Charlie Wolf arrived — or rather, Charles Wolfe.

(The third one was born to former Bachelor in Paradise contestants Evan Bass and Carly Waddell.)

From an article and a blog post about the naming of Wendy’s:

When it came to deciding what to call the chain, [Dave Thomas] tried out the names of all five of his children before he settled on the nickname for his daughter, Melinda, which was Wendy.

Before my dad left us [in 2002], we had a long conversation about him naming the restaurant Wendy’s. It was the first time we’d ever had this conversation. He said, “You know what? I’m sorry.” I asked him what he meant. He explained, “I should’ve just named it after myself, because it put a lot of pressure on you.”

From an article about the “-Mae” trend in Australia:

Marlie-Mae, Gracie-Mae, Mila-Mae… you may have noticed the trend.

Aussie celebs are giving their baby girls hyphenated names with a sweet, old-fashioned sound. The Bachelor’s Matty J and Laura Byrne went for Marlie-Mae, Bachelor In Paradise’s Simone Ormesher and partner Matt Thorne chose Gracie-Mae, while Married at First Sight’s Davina Rankin and boyfriend Jaxon Manuel decided on Mila-Mae.

[…]

Although these names might sound American – think Elly May Clampett from The Beverly Hillbillies – this is actually a huge British trend that seems to be just taking off in Australia.

For more name-related quotes, check out the name quotes category.