How popular is the baby name Millicent in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Millicent and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Millicent.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Millicent

Number of Babies Named Millicent

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Millicent

Milledulcia – Possible Baby Name?

I recently discovered an old book called Milledulcia: A Thousand Pleasant Things (1857), which is a collection of items from early issues of the periodical Notes and Queries (launched in 1849).

Milledulcia

Milledulcia is made up of the Latin elements mille (meaning “thousand”) and dulcia (meaning “sweets” or “sweet things”).

The word is pretty and name-like (similar to Millicent and Dulcinea), it has a pleasant definition, and either side of it could be turned to a nickname (like Millie or Dulcie).

So here’s my question: Do you think Milledulcia might make a good baby name?

P.S. Other names I’ve spotted in N&Q: Actsapostles, Adnil, Elmadoras, Gloxinia, Louvima, Saba, Togotubuline.


3 Baby Names Inspired by the Election

Barack Obama1 & 2:
Barack and Mitt, twin baby boys, were born to Millicent Owuor of Kenya on the day of the election. Barack was the first twin born, Mitt the second. “Several other new mothers around Kogelo also named their newborns after Obama, but Owuor was the only one to call her baby Mitt.”

3:
Senator, a baby boy, was born to Chris and Wendi Bench of Utah. Wendi said, “I’m not really sure what influenced it…but I thought it would be a great name to give him a little bit of respect, with some room for scandal.”

Sources: Kenyan mother names new babies Barack and Mitt, Kenyan twins named after Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, Utah Couple Dubs Their Kid ‘Senator’

First Names from King Henry III’s Fine Rolls (1200s)

Henry III of EnglandI’ve got some 13th-century English names for you today!

They come from the fine rolls of King Henry III (1216–1272). The fine rolls were basically financial records. King Henry III wasn’t the first to keep them, but they “expand[ed] considerably in size and content during Henry’s reign.”

The Henry III Fine Rolls Project has translated the fine rolls from Latin to English, if you want to check them out.

Even better for our purposes, though, is this nifty database of given names in the Fine Rolls of Henry III, which shows us the most-mentioned male names and female names in the rolls.

(These lists aren’t the same as the single-year, society-wide baby name popularity lists we’re accustomed to — they cover a wide range of birth years, and a small segment of society — but they do give us a general idea of which names were the most popular during the 1200s.)

Of the 8,423 male names in the fine rolls, these were the most popular:

  1. William (1,217 mentions)
  2. John (669)
  3. Richard (495)
  4. Robert (434)
  5. Henry (376)
  6. Ralph (365)
  7. Thomas (351)
  8. Walter (346)
  9. Roger (337)
  10. Hugh (297)
  11. Geoffrey (261)
  12. Simon (218)
  13. Adam (200)
  14. Nicholas, Peter (180 each)
  15. Gilbert (157)
  16. Alan (110)
  17. Phillip (109)
  18. Reginald (88)
  19. Stephen (83)
  20. Elias (66)
  21. Alexander (65)
  22. Osbert (52)
  23. Eustace (44)
  24. Andrew, Matthew (42 each)
  25. Ranulf (40)

Other names on the men’s list: Hamo, Fulk, Payn, Waleran, Drogo, Engeram, Amfrid, Ratikin, Walkelin, Bonefey, Fulcher, Hasculf, Herlewin, Joldwin, Lefsi, Marmaduke, Orm, Albizium, Cocky, Deulobene, Gwenwynwyn, Markewart.

Of the 1,314 female names in the fine rolls, these were the most popular:

  1. Alice (140 mentions)
  2. Matilda (138)
  3. Agnes (76)
  4. Margaret (69)
  5. Joan (62)
  6. Isabella (60)
  7. Emma (37)
  8. Beatrice (34)
  9. Mabel (33)
  10. Cecilia (32)
  11. Christiana (30)
  12. Hawise (29)
  13. Juliana (27)
  14. Sibyl (25)
  15. Rose (21)
  16. Sarra (16)
  17. Helewise (15)
  18. Avice, Eleanor, Eva, Lucy (14 each)
  19. Leticia (13)
  20. Felicia (12)
  21. Isolda, Margery, Petronilla (11 each)
  22. Ascelina, Edith (10 each)
  23. Phillippa (9)
  24. Amice, Elena, Katherine, Mary, Sabina (8)
  25. Basilia, Muriel (7)

Other names on the women’s list: Albrea, Amabilia, Eustachia, Idonea, Egidia, Millicent, Amphelisa, Avegaya, Barbata, Comitessa, Frethesenta, Wulveva, Alveva, Dervorguilla, Deulecresse, Elizabeth (just 1!), Flandrina, Oriolda.

See any names you like?

Source: The Henry III Fine Rolls by David Carpenter

Baby Name Needed for the Sibling of Atticus

A reader named Jessica has a son named Atticus and is expecting her second baby at the end of February. Here’s what she says:

We don’t know the gender of this baby, but we have already agreed on a boy’s name (which I can’t share–sorry!–because my husband and I have agreed not to tell anyone), but we have yet to agree on a girl’s name. We’ve come up with several ideas (Annaliese, Piper, Penelope, Evelyn), but nothing seems to fit. Generally, we like less common names with a bit of history to them. Definitely nothing trendy or “made up.” Also, no names starting with a “B” since the child’s last name will begin with a “B” and I’m not keen on the combination. We are pretty flexible on middle names, so I’m not worried about that. Hope you can help! Thanks!

Here are some ideas to kick things off:

Anastasia
Camille
Celia
Daphne
Genevieve
Helen
Imogen
Ione
Linnea
Luna
Millicent
Naomi
Phronie (Sophronia)
Pippa (Philippa)
Rhea
Romy (Rosemary)
Rosalind
Sabine
Tamar
Venetia
Winifred

Do you like any of these with Atticus? What other girl names would you suggest to Jessica?

Baby Names Needed for Fraternal Twins, Boy & Girl

A reader named Abby is expecting fraternal twins, a boy and a girl, in October. She and her husband already have a son named Leo Sebastian.

They’re aiming for vintage names (with kind of a quirky/British feel) that aren’t too popular. These are their favorites so far, top picks in italics.

Boy Names Girl Names
Her Picks: Edward (Teddy)
Henry
Jasper
Jude
Maxwell (Max)
Oliver
Alice
Elsa (Elsie)
Ivy
Juliet
Violet
His Picks: August (Auggie/Gus)
Dashiell (Dash)
Beatrix
Felicity
Matilda
Penelope (Nellie)
Ramona

Abby says, “He thinks mine are slightly boring, I think his are a tad too flamboyant.”

They’d like our opinions on two things:

  1. What other boy and girl names would we suggest?
  2. Out of the current favorites, what are the best pairings?

The twins’ surname will be similar to Waters.

Here are my thoughts…

1. First, name suggestions. Most of these names have a vintage feel, and none of are currently in the top 100 (though several are heading that way).

Boy Names Girl Names
Archer
Byron
Calvin
Elias
Felix
Gideon
Graham
Grant
Heath
Hugh
Niles
Oscar
Pierce
Roman
Rufus
Seth
Silas
Simon
Theodore (Teddy)
Tobias
Adele/Adeline
Camille
Cecily
Celia
Corinne
Daphne
Eloise
Esme
Eugenia
Flora
Hazel
Helena
Iris
Jane
Josephine
Marion
Millicent (Millie)
Nicola
Rosamund
Stella

I didn’t include any w-names, but I was tempted to throw in Willa and Winifred (Winnie). Maybe even Wilhelmina (Minnie).

2. Out of the current favorites, Henry and Penelope are the two I like best for twins. I also like Maxwell and Beatrix (because both have that quirky x).

What other names/pairings would you suggest to Abby?

Baby Name Needed – Middle Name for Leah

A reader named Nita is having a baby girl. The baby’s first name will be Leah, and Nita is looking for middle name suggestions that work with Leah. She writes:

We want it to start with a consonant and end in a consonant. Since the first name is pretty short, we’d like the middle name to be three or four syllables long. And please, not floral names. (And no names that sound like Beatrice/Beatrix, Margaret or Ursula.)

I think French names are a smart place to start, as many French names are fairly long and begin and end with consonant sounds.

Benjamine
Bernadette
Bernardine
Caroline
Celestine
Dominique
Felicienne
Gabrielle
Geraldine
Henriette
Josephine
Julienne
Juliette
Madeleine
Marcelline
Marianne
Micheline
Nicolette
Nicoline
Pascaline
Raphaelle
Sebastienne
Veronique
Victorine

Here are some other possibilities:

Christabel
Claribel
Dolores
Gillian
Guinevere
Gwendolen
Harriet
Jennifer
Maribel
Marisol
Marybeth
Marylouise
Mehetabel
Meredith
Millicent
Miriam
Rosalind
Rosamund
Vivian
Winifred

Which of the above do you like best with Leah? What other middle names can you come up with for Nita?

Would You Name Your Baby after Spam?

Unsolicited, virus-laden e-mails touting online casinos, prescription medications, and sketchy dating sites…nothing but a nuisance, right?

Not if you’re stuck for a baby name.

Think about it: Every day, you automatically receive a new batch of random names in your spam folder. It costs you nothing. And the names often come paired with surnames that can spark ideas about sound combinations, syllabic patterns, and so forth. (Who knew spam could be so useful?)

Here are some interesting spam names I’ve collected recently:

Amparo Darnell
Ann U. Fritz
Astrid Gabel
Audra Hodges
Aurora Barrett
Beulah Leopold
Basil Mayberry
Buford Dupree
Carmila Nugget
Colette Rowland
Constance Yoder
Daphne Simmons
Delbert Bacon
Dina Bradford
Dino Malone
Dolores Lutz
Etna Tabernacle
Georgine Wansley
Gerald Chaney
Guillermo Mobley
Humberto Gipson
Hunter Cobbs
Ivan Swartz
Jaxon Rivera
Jesse Lustful
Kermit Teague
Lance Lewis
Lillian Villalobos
Lloyd Schulz
Lolita Tobin
Maeva Volkman
Magnolia Nilda
Margarita McKeever
Maximilian Brooks
Mildred Fairweather
Milford Finley
Millicent Zapata
Minerva Villarreal
Misti Broccoli
Mohammed North
Nola Chandler
Norwood Fruge
Octavio Whitlock
Olga Braun
Omar Dyer
Opal Shirley
Ophelia Hope
Osvaldo Snow
Paderau Kuhn
Reva Cruz
Rigoberto Hickory
Roman Bruno
Roscoe D. Combs
Royce Weiss
Santiago Youngblood
Saxon Lessley
Sophie Sherwood
Sprita Coughlan
Tisha Moon
Tola Templeton
Tolbert N. Humphrey
Tyree Gill
Urban Roy
Uri Bryan
Vicky Puckett
Xenia Peaslee
Zelma Ambrose
Zion Garcia

What do you think — could spam inspire a baby name?