How popular is the baby name Mitzi in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Mitzi and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Mitzi.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Mitzi

Number of Babies Named Mitzi

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Mitzi

Baby Name Battle – 7 Hungarian Girl Names

Katinka, Sari, Ella, Mici, Terka, Liza and Klara were the names of the seven sisters in the lost silent film The Seven Sisters (1915), which was based on a Hungarian play.

The Seven Sisters (1915)
Scene from The Seven Sisters (1915).

A 1916 advertisement for the movie, which was a vehicle for silent film actress Marguerite Clark, offered the following summary:

The story is as simple and as sweet and dainty as Little Marguerite herself. She is the fourth of a family of seven sisters. Under an old Hungarian marriage law she must not marry until the elder sisters have gone off. How she and her lover clear the way with the aid of that young man’s marriageable friends affords scope for some delightful comedy amid the quaintest and most beautiful old-world surroundings ever portrayed.

The names Katinka, Sari, Ella, Mici, Terka, Liza and Klara are Hungarian versions (or diminutives of Hungarian versions) of the names Katherine, Sarah, Eleanor (or some other El- or -ella name), Mitzi, Theresa, Elizabeth and Clara.

And now for today’s question…

Which Hungarian girl name do you like best?

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Sources:

  • Bacon, George Vaux. “Seven Sisters.” Photoplay Magazine Sept. 1915: 112-120.
  • Advertisements.” New Zealand Herald 21 Aug. 1916: 12.

Name Your Munchkin after a Munchkin?

If you’re a huge Oz fan — or just a fan of old-fashioned names generally — here’s a list of (most of) the people who played Munchkins in the legendary 1939 movie “The Wizard of Oz”:

Male Female
Adam
Albert
Arnold
August
Bela
Bernard
Billy (2)
Carl (2)
Carlos
Charles (4)
Charley
Clarence
Colonel
Dominick
Eddie
Elmer
Emil
Eugene
Eulie
Frank (3)
Franklin
Franz
Fredreich
Garland
George (2)
Gerard
Gus
Harry
Harvey
Henry
Howard
Jack
Jakob (2)
James (2)
Jimmie
Jessie
John (2)
Johnny (3)
Joseph (2)
Karl
Kurt
Lajos
Leon
Lewis
Matjus
Matthew
Meinhardt
Mickey
Murray
Nels
Nicholas
Parnell
Prince
Robert
Sandor
Theodore
Tommy
Victor
Walter
Willi
William (2)
Addie
Alta
Ann
Betty (2)
Carolyn
Charlotte
Christie
Dolly
Donna
Elizabeth
Elly
Elsie
Emma
Ethel
Eva
Fern
Freda
Frieda
Gertrude
Gladys (2)
Gracie
Hazel (2)
Helen (2)
Hilda (2)
Hildred
Jeane
Joan
Josefine
Leona
Lida
Lillian
Margaret (3)
Marguerite
Marie
Mitzi
Nita
Nona
Olga
Patsy
Priscilla
Ruth (2)
Shirley
Stella
Thaisa
Valerie
Viola
Yvonne

While the majority of the 132 Munchkins in the film were played by little people, a handful of the female Munchkins were actually played by child actresses.

Source: The Wizardry of Oz by Jay Scarfone and William Stillman, via Kansas Wizard of Oz ‘N More.

The Mitzi Gaynor Theory

I read something about actress Mitzi Gaynor today, and it reminded me about a post I wrote a few months ago about “tz” names.

Mitzi was one of only two “tz” baby names to be among the top 1,000 baby names in the nation during the mid-1900s. Interestingly, while it barely ranked most years in the 1940s, it suddenly became very popular in the early 1950s.

I wonder: did Mitzi Gaynor have anything to do with it? Her films began coming out about 1950, and her name jumped in popularity from 1951 to 1953. She retired from films in the early sixties, and the first year her name dropped out of the top 500 was in 1965.

I don’t know much about Mitzi Gaynor (whose birth name was actually Francesca), so I’m only postulating. Anyone else know if she was famous enough to hold sway over the tastes of expectant parents?