How popular is the baby name Nasser in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Nasser and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Nasser.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Nasser

Number of Babies Named Nasser

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Nasser

Gamal & Nasser: Suez Crisis Baby Names?

gamal nasser, dwight eisenhower, ike, 1960,
Dwight Eisenhower and Gamal Nasser, 1960

Egyptian politician Gamal Abdel Nasser became one of the primary leaders of Egypt following the Egyptian Revolution of 1952.* He was elected president of the country on June 23, 1956.

A little more than a month after the election, on July 26, Nasser nationalized the 120-mile Suez Canal. Up to that point, the canal had been controlled jointly by Britain and France. Nasser did this in response to the U.S. and Britain withdrawing their offers to help finance the construction of the Aswan Dam, which was part of Nasser’s plan to improve Egypt’s economy and thereby modernize the country.

In late October and early November, forces from Israel, France, and Great Britain invaded Egypt. But the aggression was opposed by much of the rest of the world, including both the U.S. and the Soviet Union, and the three invading countries were pressured to withdraw from Egypt over the following weeks and months.

So, Gamal Nasser emerged victorious from the Suez Crisis. (It was now “clear that the old colonial powers, Great Britain and France, had been supplanted as the world’s preeminent geopolitical forces by the United States and Soviet Union.”) And in 1957, both Gamal and Nasser saw enough usage as baby names to debut on the U.S. baby name charts:

Year Usage of Gamal Usage of Nasser
1959 13 baby boys 6 baby boys
1958 8 baby boys 7 baby boys
1957 9 baby boys [debut] 7 baby boys [debut]
1956 unlisted unlisted

Many of these early Gamals and Nassers were born in New York and Illinois — likely New York City and Chicago specifically — and could therefore be babies born into Egyptian-American families.

Sources: SSA, BBC – History – British History in depth: The Suez Crisis, What was the Suez Crisis? – Ask History

*The revolution overthrew King Farouk, whose first wife was Farida.


51 Baby Names Banned in Saudi Arabia (Maybe)

Did Saudi Arabia really ban 51 baby names recently? I’m not sure.

Last week, the country’s Civil Affairs Department supposedly released a list of 51 unacceptable baby names — names that were either “not in line with social traditions,” “not appropriate in terms of religion,” or of Western origin.*

Over the weekend, though, a spokesperson from the Civil Affairs Department said that, while the department does regulate baby names, it didn’t release the list in question.

Here are the 51 (possibly) banned baby names:

Malak (“angel” in Arabic)
Abdul Ati
Abdul Nasser (“servant of the helper” in Arabic)
Abdul Mosleh
Nabi
Nabiya
Emir (“prince” in Arabic)
Somu
Al-Mamlaka (“the kingdom” in Arabic)
Malika (“queen” in Arabic)
Mamlaka (“kingdom” in Arabic)
Tabaraka
Nardeen
Maya
Linda
Randa
Basmalah (“in the name of God” in Arabic)
Tuleen
Arm
Nareej
Rital
Als
Sandi
Rama (“pleasing” in Sanskrit; Hindu god)
Maleen
Eleen
Alas
Ainar
Loran
Malkiteena
Lareen
Kibriyal
Laureen
Binyameen (Arabic form of Benjamin)
Narees
Yara
Sitaf
Aileen
Loland
Tilaj
Barah
Abdul Nabi
Abdul Rasool (“servant of the messenger” in Arabic)
Jibreel (Arabic form of Gabriel)
Abdul Mo’een
Abrar
Milak
Aiman
Bayan
Baseel
Rilam

*The Gulf News believes some of the names were included for political reasons — Abdul Nasser because of Egypt’s second president Gamal Abdel Nasser, for instance, and Binyamin because of Israeli’s current prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Sources: Interior Ministry bans 51 baby names, Civil Affairs denies banning baby names, Why did Saudi Arabia ban 51 baby names?