How popular is the baby name Natalia in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Natalia.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Natalia


Posts that Mention the Name Natalia

Popular Baby Names in Slovakia, 2018

According to Slovakia’s Interior Ministry, the most popular baby names in the country in 2018 were Sofia and Jakub.

Here are Slovakia’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2018:

Girl Names
1. Sofia, 772 baby girls
2. Ema, 706
3. Nina, 671
4. Viktória, 670
5. Natália, 603
6. Eliška, 578
7. Nela, 493
8. Tamara, 471
9. Laura, 448
10. Hana, 444

Boy Names
1. Jakub, 1,266 baby boys
4. Adam, 975
3. Michal, 934
4. Samuel, 913
5. Tomáš, 850
6. Filip, 767
7. Matej, 760
8. Martin, 754
9. Oliver, 753
10. Lukáš, 721

Sofia has been the #1 girl name in the country since 2008, and Jakub has been the #1 boy name “for most of the past decade.”

Though names of international origin (“such as Lucas or Vivien”) started filtering into Slovakia after WWII, they didn’t become popular until relatively recently.

(For other European baby name rankings, see the European baby name rankings subcategory.)

Source: 2018: What were the most popular names for babies born in Slovakia?

Popular Baby Names in Poland, 2016

According to data released by the government of Poland, the most popular baby names in the country in 2016 were Zuzanna and Antoni.

Here are Poland’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Zuzanna, 8,837 baby girls
2. Julia, 8,637
3. Lena, 8,367
4. Maja, 8,303
5. Hanna, 7,948
6. Zofia, 7,702
7. Amelia, 6,598
8. Alicja, 5,692
9. Aleksandra, 5,428
10. Natalia, 4,809

Boy Names
1. Antoni, 9,183 baby boys
2. Jakub, 8,942
3. Szymon, 8,264
4. Jan, 7,584
5. Filip, 6,674
6. Franciszek, 6,551
7. Mikołaj, 6,380
8. Aleksander, 6,248
9. Kacper, 5,995
10. Wojciech, 5,915

Each of these lists include the same 10 names as the year before, but in slightly different order. (The #1 names in 2015 were Zuzanna and Jakub.)

Here are the top baby names in Warsaw in 2015, and the top baby names in Poland in 2013.

Source: Data for 2016 – Ministry of Digitization (found via Maybe it is Daijiro)

Name Quotes #43 – Agnieszka, Shaniqua, Fire

"I love the Q. It's the most distinctive thing about me." Quote from stem cell scientist George Q. Daley.

From “I Love the Q,” a Harvard Medical School interview with stem-cell scientist George Q. Daley:

HMS: So you have five brothers and sisters?

DALEY: Yes. I was born fifth, and my middle name, Quentin, means “fifth-born.”

HMS: I was going to ask why you use the Q.

DALEY: I love the Q. It’s the most distinctive thing about me. Everybody asks, “What’s the Q stand for?”

From “Michael Caine’s Name Is Now Officially Michael Caine” by Jackson McHenry at Vulture:

Maurice Micklewhite is dead; long live Michael Caine. The legendary British actor has officially adopted the name you know and impersonate him by after getting fed up with increased airport security checks. “I changed my name when all the stuff started with ISIS and all that,” Caine told The Sun, going on to describe his experiences with security guards thusly: “He would say, ‘Hi Michael Caine,’ and suddenly I’d be giving him a passport with a different name on it. I could stand there for an hour. So I changed my name.”

From “Frond this way: Lady Gaga’s ferns” by Ben Guarino of Scienceline:

In a 2006 letter to Nature, Australian geneticist Ken Maclean highlights the pitfalls of fanciful names: “The quirky sense of humour that researchers display in choosing a gene name often loses much in translation when people facing serious illness or disability are told that they or their child have a mutation in a gene such as Sonic hedgehog, Slug or Pokemon.”

From “Translating Names” by Dariusz Galasiński

Translating names mostly goes one way. Somehow ‘we’ must translate our names into English, and ‘you’ don’t have to translate yours into Polish, Estonian, Romanian or Slovak. And that makes the translation much more political than linguistic. And if it is political, I go against!

[…]

And here is the main point of this post – it’s not linguistic, I’m afraid. Names are political. And I think it’s important to keep them. Michał, Agnieszka, Małgorzata, Paweł, Justyna…these are your names, don’t change them to Michael, Agnes, Margaret, Paul or Justine. If they care, they will learn, if they don’t — it’s their loss.

(Found via “What’s in a name? Introducing yourself in academia” by Marta Natalia Wróblewska, via Clare’s Name News.)

From “The Jody Grind” by Jody Rosen in Slate:

Could it be that we are best served by imperfect, not perfect, names? When a baby is saddled with a name, he is taught a first lesson about pitiless fate and life’s limitations–that there are aspects of the self that can never be self-determined, circumstances that must be stoically endured, and, hopefully, someday, made peace with. There are a goodly number of us who wear our names not like a precious spell but like a humbler workaday garment. Whatever you’re called–Jody or Sue or Moon Unit or Jermajesty or maybe even Anus–you can, if you’re lucky, reach that state of grace where you hardly notice your name is there at all. You wake up in the morning and slide right into it, like a well–broken-in pair of pantaloons.

From “What’s in a Name? Exhibit explores identity, prejudice” (about a pop-up art exhibition by Donna Woodley) in The Tennessean:

“The idea for this project came as I was typing names one day. I realized that the Microsoft Word program would indicate that some names were spelled incorrectly — a red wavy line would appear under them — but not others. I’d type a name like Elizabeth or Judy and there’d be no red line, which implied it was spelled correctly. Then I’d type a name like Shaniqua, LaQuisha, or other black women’s names I knew, and they would get a red line under them, like it was spelled wrong.”

[…]

“It made me wonder, does Microsoft have a diversity department?” said Woodley.

(Found via the ANS post Names exhibit in Nashville, TN explores identity and prejudice.)

From “Church won’t let me call my son ‘Jesus’” by Cate Mukei at Standard Digital Entertainment (Kenya):

The rights activist [Nderitu Njoka] said he just wanted to prove his deeply rooted Christian faith by naming his son ‘Jesus’.

‘After all, the name is common in Portugal, Spain, and Mexico which are God fearing. My call is to Christians to start naming their sons Jesus since by doing this they will be preaching gospel of Jesus Christ to the world without hypocrisy,” the letter says.

From Politics, Religion and…Baby Names by Tim Bradley:

Our oldest son Jay (who was almost two at the time) insisted on calling our baby-to-be “Baby Fire” while my wife was pregnant. It caught on and throughout my wife’s pregnancy, our families would ask, “How’s Baby Fire doing?” Although it seemed like a fitting name, we just dismissed it thinking “Fire” was too “out there” for anyone to be on board. But on the way to the hospital during the wee hours of the morning on July 4th, my wife and I decided that “Fire” as a middle name seemed appropriate. It will forever link our sons since it was Jay’s idea, and it captures the memories and emotions we felt throughout the pregnancy. There’s the July 4th fireworks tie-in as well. And let’s face it “Fire” as a middle name is only one step away from “Danger” as the coolest name ever.

From H. L. Mencken’s The American Language (1921):

The religious obsession of the New England colonists is also kept in mind by the persistence of Biblical names: Ezra, Hiram, Ezekiel, Zechariah, Elijah, Elihu, and so on. These names excite the derision of the English; an American comic character, in an English play or novel, always bears one of them.

For more quotes, check out the name quotes category.

Popular Baby Names in Warsaw, 2015

According to data released by the City of Warsaw, the most popular baby names in Warsaw, Poland, in 2015 were Zofia and Jan.

Here are Warsaw’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2015:

Baby Girl Names Baby Boy Names
1. Zofia, 535 baby girls
2. Zuzannę, 506
3. Julii, 486
4. Hanna, 441
5. Alicja, 434
6. Maria, 409
7. Maja, 405
8. Natalia, 401
9. Aleksandra, 371
10. Amelia, 336
1. Jan, 677 baby boys
2. Antoni, 558
3. Jakub, 471
4. Aleksander, 418
5. Franciszek, 411
6. Adam, 399
7. Filip, 343
8. Stanisław, 334
9. Szymon, 329
10. Mikołaj, 320

Amelia replaces Lena in the girls’ top 10, and Szymon replaces Kacper in the boys’ top 10.

Source: Warszawiaków przybywa – City of Warsaw (via Popularity of names in Warsaw, Poland, 2015)

Name Quotes for the Weekend #31

Saint Hubbins? "He was the patron saint of quality footwear."

From the movie This is Spinal Tap, Marty DiBergi interviewing David St. Hubbins:

Marty: David St. Hubbins…I must admit I’ve never heard anybody with that name.
David: It’s an unusual name. Well, he was an unusual saint. He’s not a very well known saint.
Marty: Oh, there actually is, uh, there was a Saint Hubbins?
David: That’s right, yes.
Marty: What was he the saint of?
David: He was the patron saint of quality footwear.

Here’s an audio clip:


From “Tajiks weigh ban on ‘bad names’” (Turkish Weekly) which I found while researching names in Tajikistan:

Among older generations, it is not uncommon in Tajikistan to see first names like Khoshok (Fodder), Sangak (Small Stone), Istad (Should Stay), or Pocho (Son-in-Law.)

The reasoning behind the unusual eponyms can be attributed to the superstition that giving a child an unflattering name will make them less desirable, and thus prevent God from taking them away.

[Names like these are often described as “apotropaic,” which is based on the Greek word apotropaios, which means “turning away (evil).”]

From “Keeping the data trackers honest” (Washington Post) by columnist Catherine Rampell:

Meinrath says he wastes a lot of time each month trying to correct faulty automated interpretations about him. He’s a man named Sascha, after all, and corporations irksomely address him as “Mrs.” a lot.

From “Transportation” (Full Grown People) by Wendy Wisner:

The little girl never made it to America.

My grandmother didn’t know how she died. And I was too shocked to ask.

“They named me Nachama, which means comfort, because I was her replacement,” she said.

But no one ever called her that. Her name was Emma.

Vogue editor Anna Wintour (in the February 2011 issue) writing about Tucson-born model Arizona Muse:

When I look at Arizona, I see shadows of Linda Evangelista and Natalia Vodianova, but most of all I see her, a gorgeous, smart, grown-up. And how could anyone resist someone with that name?

From an interview with musician Zella Day (Huffington Post) by Michael Bialas:

What’s the inside story behind your name?

ZD: Zella is from the 1840s. My parents got married in Jerome, Arizona. And when they were getting married, they were looking for baby names. And there was a book of the town’s history in Jerome, and they were scouting locations for the wedding. And they just walked into a museum and they were looking through this book. And one of the main coal miner’s wives was named Zella — 1842. There’s actually a song on the record called “Jerome.” That’s about the ghostly woman behind my name.

From “Destiny” at the blog Futility Closet:

The pickle industry’s “man of the year” in 1948 was named Dill L. Pickle.

I can’t think of anything to say about this.