How popular is the baby name Norvin in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Norvin and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Norvin.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Norvin

Number of Babies Named Norvin

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Norvin

Week of Hair: Babies Named After Venida Hair Nets

The Rieser Company of New York started selling Venida hair nets around 1907. The company’s founder, Norvin Rieser, created the name Venida out of the Latin phrase ‘veni, vidi, vici.’

venida
Venida hair net (packaging)

In the ’20s, the baby name Venida started popping up on the SSA’s baby name list:

  • 1928: unlisted
  • 1927: 10 baby girls named Venida
  • 1926: unlisted
  • 1925: 9 baby girls named Venida
  • 1924: 6 baby girls named Venida
  • 1923: 10 baby girls named Venida
  • 1922: unlisted
  • 1921: 6 baby girls named Venida [debut]
  • 1920: unlisted

How much of this can be attributed to the hair product? It’s hard to say exactly, as the baby name Venida pre-dates the hair net, but I’d bet at least some of the increased usage of that decade can be linked to Venida advertisements, which included:

  • Venida contests, like this one mentioned in Popular Mechanics in mid-1921:

    In a contest open to women and girls only, prizes will be awarded for the greatest number of words made from any or all of the letters in the phrase “Venida Hair Net.”

    First prize was $1,000, second was $500, and third was $200.*

  • Venida billboards, like this Venida billboard on the Atlantic City boardwalk in 1920. (And it lit up at night!)

The Rieser Company eventually started selling other hair-related products (e.g., bobby pins, shampoo) but hair nets were always the main draw, judging by the Venida Hair Net ads that regularly appeared in major magazines like LIFE in the mid-20th century.

The hair nets continued to be sold at least until the early 1960s, but I’m not sure what became of the company after that.

What do you think of the baby name Venida?

Source: Hickerson, J. M., ed. How I Made the Sale that Did the Most for Me. New York: Prentice Hall, 1951.

*Speaking of baby names inspired by contests, check out Norita.


Phone Book Fishing on Kauai – Flordeliz, Kuuipo, Scottland, Zenichi

I’ve been on the Hawaiian island of Kauai for the past few days, and — in between checking out various canyons, waterfalls, and lava-rock pools — I scanned the Kauai phone book for cool first names.

Here are the most interesting I found:

Alouette
Ariston
Asipeli
Benhur
Bienvenido
Bonifacio
Buenaventura
Buenoflora
Butac
Castro
Charming
Clisson
Cobina
Corazon
Danalan
Danvic
Delpidio
Dominador
Edelwisa
Ederline
Eleuterio
Emiteria
Ercelly
Estanislao
Eufracio
Eugemar
Expedita
Fakhry
Filsann
Flavra
Florafina
Flordeliz
Framil
Franchot
Fredinita
Fredlynn
Fualupe
Germilin
Geronimo
Gingerlynn
Granatanne
Guadencio
Haunani
Hedelisa
Heifara
Hermogenes
Huilani
Hulukape
Ilaise
Irvharc
Iwalani
Jhoane
Judhvir
Kai-nani
Kalani
Kananaikahaku
Katalika
Keikilane
Keohokui
Kilaina
Kuuipo*
Kuulei
Laninbwij
Laukona
Leialoha
Leimomi
Leilani
Leodigario
Lichelle
Linekona
Lockwood
Lodring
Loisi
Mariamagdalena
Masanori
Mavourneen
Memory
Michael-Michael
Milimili
Mimsy
Mitsuji
Monalisa
Myloyce
Nandanie
Naokichi
Nargis
Nathrene
Necoal
Nolemana
Norvin
Olegario
Oric
Otusia
Petroline
Porfiria
Primrose
Puanani
Rikito
Rizal
Rudra
Rustico
Sadhunathan
Sailor
Saturnina
Scottland
Shigenori
Shyronjon
Sioux
Sojourner-Truth
Surachat
Texas
Thanawat
Tirunathan
Tootsie
Trinidad
Trink
Utahua
Villamor
Vitaliama
Vrushali
Waihang
Waldemar
Wannapha
Warlito
Watoru
Welerico
Wiphada
Woonteng
Zenichi

The names in boldface are my favorites.

*Kuuipo is based on a Hawaiian word meaning “my sweetheart.” I’ve been seeing a lot of it in jewelry stores, engraved on rings, bracelets and pendants.

Hawaii Posts: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7