How popular is the baby name Ole in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Ole and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Ole.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Ole

Number of Babies Named Ole

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Ole

Popular Baby Names in Norway, 2014

According to data from Statistics Norway, the most popular baby names in Norway in 2014 were Nora/Norah and Lucas/Lukas.

Here are Norway’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2014:

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Nora/Norah, 434 baby girls
2. Emma, 418
3. Sara/Sarah, 404
4. Sofie/Sophie, 388
5. Emilie, 358
6. Anna, 327
7. Linnea/Linea, 326
8. Thea/Tea, 323
9. Maja/Maia/Maya, 323
10. Sofia/Sophia, 315
1. Lucas/Lukas, 448 baby boys
2. William, 438
3. Markus/Marcus, 423
4. Emil, 419
5. Oskar/Oscar, 389
6. Mathias/Matias, 382
7. Magnus, 377
8. Filip/Fillip/Philip, 372
9. Jakob/Jacob, 371
10. Aksel/Axel, 363

Though Mohammad didn’t feature in the national top 10, it was the #1 boy name in the capital city of Oslo. (The #1 girl name there was Nora.)

In contrast with the above, these are Norway’s top 10 female and male names overall:

Female Names Male Names
1. Anne, 61k females
2. Inger, 31k
3. Kari, 26k
4. Marit, 26k
5. Ingrid, 24k
6. Liv, 23k
7. Eva, 19k
8. Anna, 18k
9. Maria, 18k
10. Ida, 18k
1. Jan, 49k males
2. Per, 38k
3. Bjørn, 38k
4. Ole, 31k
5. Lars, 30k
6. Kjell, 27k
7. Knut, 25k
8. Svein, 25k
9. Arne, 24k
10. Thomas, 24k

The only earlier list I have for Norway is from 2010, but more lists (and more names from the 2014 list) are available via the first link below.

Sources: Navn – SSB, ‘Nora’ and ‘Lucas’ Most Popular Names

Random Road Trip Names – Uneeda, Askew, Bovina

Last week we went on a road trip, mainly to Minnesota and Missouri. Here are some names I spotted while we were out and about:

Ole & Lena

At the Mall of America, I noticed a display of “Ole and Lena” branded items — joke books, mugs, jams, jellies, even fortune cookies. Apparently the characters Ole and Lena are well-known in the Upper Midwest, where there are a number of Scandinavian-Americans.

Ole is a short form of Olaf.

Lena is short form of Helena, Magdalena, and other names that end with -lena.


In Kansas City, we toured the Money Museum at the Federal Reserve Bank.

Federal Reserve Bank, Kansas City
Federal Reserve Bank, Kansas City

We saw the huge cash vault, and the three robots that carry large containers of cash into and out of storage.

I noticed that robot #2 was named Dewey. That made me think of George Dewey, so I told my husband, “I bet all three names have some sort of military connection. Maybe they’re all named after naval commanders, or war heroes.”

And then we saw car #1, Huey. Then car #3, Louie.

He laughed at me.

Not war heroes. Just Disney. Figures.


Also at the money museum, we watched a short movie about how Kansas City fought to be chosen as one of the nation’s Federal Reserve cities back in early 1914.

The movie featured a lot of old black-and-white photographs, one of which was a building with “Uneeda Biscuit 5¢” painted on the side.

That reminded me about the baby name Uneeda:

  • 1968: 5 baby girls named Uneeda
  • 1962: 5 baby girls named Uneeda
  • 1961: 7 baby girls named Uneeda
  • 1931: 9 baby girls named Uneeda
  • 1929: 5 baby girls named Uneeda [debut]

In fact, the popular Uneeda Biscuit was probably the very thing that inspired parents of the ’20s and ’30s to try out Uneeda as a first name.

The biscuit was a product of the National Biscuit Company, later shortened to “Nabisco.”

I’m thinking the ’60s usage was more likely inspired by the Uneeda Doll Company.


Of course, since we were in KC, we had to go and test out Google Fiber at the Google Fiber Space.

While we were there, I noticed a big map of the city on the wall. And that’s where I spotted Askew Avenue:

Askew Avenue, Kansas City
Askew Avenue, Kansas City

It goes on for blocks and blocks, perfectly straight, never veering east or west. Not askew at all! I found that funny.

Have babies ever been named Askew? Yes, hundreds. A few examples:

  • Askew Mathew, born in 1611 in Hertfordshire, England
  • Askew Beards Burbidge, born in 1751 in Warwickshire, England
  • Askew Peacock, born in 1888 in Alabama
  • Askew Kenneth Edward Taylor Askew, born in 1996 in Texas

Askew beards! What a visual.

I’m sure that in most (if not all) cases, the first name Aksew was inspired by the surname Askew, which referred originally to the village of Aiskew in North Yorkshire, England.


We’ve taken I-80 a bunch of times, but never I-70, so the town names on this trip were all new to me.

One of the names I noticed was Bovina, which is a town in eastern Colorado. The name was surely inspired by the word “bovine.”

The states of Mississippi, New York, Texas, and Wisconsin also have places called Bovina.

And dozens of U.S. babies have been named Bovina, believe it or not. Some examples:

  • Bovina Lemming, born in 1846 in Indiana
  • Bovina Wheeler, born in 1878 in Vermont
  • Bovina Parmer, born in 1910 in Texas

…And that’s most of the names I spotted. There are a few others (e.g. Cabela) but I’ll give them their own posts.

P.S. Check out the names I spotted on last year’s road trip.

Who Should Have the Final Say on Baby Names?

I’ve come across several old newspaper stories featuring husband and wife fighting over who has the “right” to name the baby.

Because this one from 1897 is in the public domain, I’ll go ahead and give you the whole thing:

The question as to whether the naming of the baby belongs, as a matter of right, to the baby’s father or to the baby’s mother was raised in a queer law suit in Eastkill, in the heart of the Catskill mountains.

The plaintiff is Ole Halverson, a Swede, who cultivates a small farm on the mountain side. He has sued for damages the Rev J. G. Remerton, a German Lutheran minister of the same place, and the pleadings set forth the following state of facts: Mr. and Mrs. Halverson have a son of tender years.

The former desired that the boy should be called Oscar, after the present monarch of Mr. Halverson’s fatherland. Mrs. Halverson dislikes the name Oscar, and was determined that the baby should not be burdened therewith. Mr. and Mrs. Halverson took the baby to the clergyman to be christened.

Mr. Halverson requested the minister to name the child Oscar, but Mrs. Halverson had already talked the reverend gentleman over, and to Mr. Halverson’s surprise and indignation the boy was christened not Oscar, but something else, whereby Mr. Halverson suffered serious disappointment, loss of authority in his household, laceration of feelings, &c., for which he prays damages.

The clergyman’s defense is that he christened the child in accordance with the wishes of its mother, whose rights in the premises he considered paramount.

The case brings up a novel question in jurisprudence, the decision of which will be regarded with interest in thousands of families throughout the land.

I haven’t been able to track down the family, so I don’t have any other details. (I do like that “loss of authority in his household” part, though.)

Who do you think should have the final say when it comes to baby names — moms or dads?

Source: “Naming the Baby.” Reading Eagle 4 Jul. 1897: 2.

Huge List of Anagram Baby Names

anagram baby names

Looking for baby names with something in common? Perhaps for a set of twins or triplets? I’ve collected hundreds of anagram baby names for you.

2-Letter Anagram Baby Names

3-Letter Anagram Baby Names

4-Letter Anagram Baby Names

5-Letter Anagram Baby Names

6-Letter Anagram Baby Names

7-Letter Anagram Baby Names

8-Letter Anagram Baby Names

9-Letter Anagram Baby Names

10-Letter Anagram Baby Names

If you like the idea of anagrams but want to avoid sound-alike sets, I recommend anagrams with different numbers of syllables. Pairs like “Etta and Tate” and “Clay and Lacy” are a far more subtle than pairs like “Enzo and Zeno” and “Mary and Myra.”

(Here are some palindromic names from last month.)