How popular is the baby name Olivia in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Olivia.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Olivia


Posts that Mention the Name Olivia

Popular Baby Names in San Diego, 2019

According to San Diego’s Health and Human Services Agency, the most popular baby names in the county in 2019 were Olivia and Liam.

Here are San Diego County’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2019:

Girl Names

  1. Olivia, 243 baby girls
  2. Emma, 212
  3. Camila, 179
  4. Mia, 176
  5. Isabella, 169
  6. Sophia, 163
  7. Charlotte, 138
  8. Luna, 133 (2-way tie)
  9. Sofia, 133 (2-way tie)
  10. Amelia, 124 (2-way tie)
  11. Victoria, 124 (2-way tie)

Boy Names

  1. Liam, 442 baby boys
  2. Noah, 188
  3. Sebastian, 174 (2-way tie)
  4. Oliver, 174 (2-way tie)
  5. Mateo, 159
  6. Ethan, 155
  7. Alexander, 149
  8. Lucas, 137
  9. Benjamin, 136
  10. Julian, 135

In the girls’ top 10, Luna and Amelia replace Mila.

In the boys’ top 10, Lucas and Julian replace Daniel and Logan.

The HHSA also reported that the top baby names of the decade (2010-2019) in San Diego County were Sophia and Noah.

(The year before, the top two names were Emma and Liam.)

Source: Top Baby Names in San Diego County in 2019 and Past Decade

Popular Baby Names in PEI, 2019

According Prince Edward Island’s Vital Statistics, the most popular baby names on the island in 2019 were Sophie and Liam.

Here are PEI’s top girl names and top boy names of 2019:

Girl Names

  1. Sophie, 12 baby girls
  2. Charlotte, 11
  3. Olivia, 9
  4. Ella and Lucy (2-way tie), 8 each
  5. Amelia, Mia, and Paisley (3-way tie), 7 each
  6. Brielle, Brooklyn, Emma, and Evelyn (4- way tie), 6 each

Boy Names

  1. Liam, 10 baby boys
  2. Benjamin, 9
  3. Carter, Hunter, Oliver, William, and Wyatt (5-way tie), 8 each
  4. Ethan, Jack, Mason, and Noah (4-way tie), 7 each

These rankings are based on provisional data covering the year up to December 17th. (By that date, 633 baby girls and 598 baby boys had been born.)

I didn’t post 2018 rankings for PEI, but in 2017 the top two names were Ava and Liam.

Source: Here are P.E.I.’s top baby names of 2019

Popular Baby Names in New York City, 2018

According to New York City’s Department of Health, the most popular baby names in the city in 2018 were Emma and Liam.

Here are New York City’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2018:

Girl Names

  1. Emma (501 born in NYC in 2018)
  2. Isabella
  3. Sophia
  4. Mia
  5. Olivia
  6. Ava
  7. Leah
  8. Sarah
  9. Amelia
  10. Chloe

Boy Names

  1. Liam (779 born in NYC in 2018)
  2. Noah
  3. Ethan
  4. Jacob
  5. Aiden
  6. David
  7. Lucas
  8. Matthew
  9. Daniel
  10. Alexander

In the girls’ top 10, Amelia and Chloe replace Emily and Abigail.

In the boys’ top 10, Alexander replaces Jayden.

In 2017, the top two names were also Emma and Liam.

Within each of the five boroughs, the top baby names were…

  • Manhattan: Emma and Noah
  • Bronx: Isabella and Liam
  • Brooklyn: Esther and David
  • Queens: Mia and Liam
  • Staten Island: Mia and Michael

And, finally, a few of the baby names bestowed just 10 times each in NYC last year were the girl names Aminah, Ida and Zadie, and the boy names Bentley, Lucian and Warren.

Source: The Top Baby Names of 2018

The Baby Name “Raven”

comic, terry and the pirates, 1941, raven sherman, baby name
The death of Raven Sherman (1941)

The name Raven has been given to babies of both genders for decades, but I find its female usage particularly interesting because girl-name Raven has gotten three distinct boosts from popular culture so far.

The first boost happened in 1941, when Raven debuted as a girl name in the data. (It had already popped up a few times as a boy name.)

Year Female usage Male usage
1943 5 babies 7 babies
1942 5 babies 5 babies
1941 6 babies [debut] .
1940 . .

In October of that year, in the comic strip Terry and the Pirates by Milton Caniff, a female character named Raven Sherman died in a dramatic and memorable sequence.

Raven, “a WASP clearly modeled on Katharine Hepburn” according to one source, was an American heiress who was working at a camp for war refugees in China. She was pushed off a moving truck, died of her injuries, and was buried on an isolated Chinese hillside. “Caniff was flooded with flower deliveries, mock memorial services, petitions of condolence signed by disparate groups as factory workers and entire colleges, as well as a lot of irate letters.”

(Terry and the Pirates also influenced the names Normandie and Merrily.)

The second pop culture boost happened in the 1970s:

Year Female usage Male usage
1978 342 babies
[rank: 533rd]
25 babies
1977 299 babies
[rank: 579th]
20 babies
1976 100 babies 10 babies
1975 17 babies 9 babies
1974 15 babies 12 babies

In 1976, the soap opera The Edge of Night introduced a female character named Raven Swift (first played by Juanin Clay, then played by Sharon Gabet). She was described as “the show’s delightful young vixen-heroine” in The Soap Opera Encyclopedia. The character remained on the show until it was canceled in 1984.

(The soap also influenced the names Teal and Laurieann.)

And the most recent (and biggest) pop culture boost happened in the early 1990s:

Year Female usage Male usage
1992 2,016 babies
[rank: 152nd]
89 babies
1991 2,026 babies
[rank: 150th]
53 babies
1990 1,758 babies
[rank: 166th]
62 babies
1989 476 babies
[rank: 495th]
27 babies
1988 327 babies
[rank: 612th]
19 babies

It went on to peak at 139th in 1993.

The reason? Actress Raven-Symoné, who first found fame as a four year old when she started playing Olivia (Denise’s step-daughter) on the The Cosby Show in 1989. The compound name Ravensymone debuted in the data in 1990, and the spelling variant Ravensimone followed in 1991. (Her Disney Channel show That’s So Raven didn’t come along until much later.)

What are your thoughts on the name Raven? Would you use it?

Sources:

Baby Name Story: Eva

We won’t know until tomorrow about the names of the first babies of 2020. Until then, here’s the story behind the name of Toronto’s first baby of 2010, Eva Violante, who arrived one second after midnight on New Year’s morning.

The parents “knew the baby was a girl and had two names picked out – Olivia and Eva.”

They chose Eva because it was the name of the doctor who delivered her, they had driven down a street in their neighbourhood with the same name, and because they thought she was going to be born on New Year’s Eve.

Neat, right? And here’s another baby whose name was chosen after a series of coincidences.

Happy New Year, everyone!

Source: First baby of the decade