How popular is the baby name Orchid in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Orchid and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Orchid.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Orchid

Number of Babies Named Orchid

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Orchid

Rare Girl Names from Early Cinema: O

orchid, gloria swanson, movie, 1926Want a rare girl name with a retro feel?

Here’s a list of uncommon, feminine O-names associated with the earliest decades of cinema.

For those that saw enough usage to register in the national data set, I’ve included links to the popularity graphs.

Enjoy!

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O Yama
O Yama was a character played by actress Florence Lawrence in the short film The Heart of O Yama (1908).

Oceola
Oceola was a character played by actress Dolly Larkin in the film Her Atonement (1913).

  • Usage of the baby name Oceola (which debuted in the data in 1913).

Odile
Odile was a character name in the films The Rat (1925) and The Rat (1937), both of which were based upon the same stage play.

  • Usage of the baby name Odile.

Ohati
Ohati was a character played by actress Anna May Wong in the film A Trip to Chinatown (1926).

Ojira
Princess Ojira was a character played by actress Helen Gardner in the film A Princess of Bagdad (1913).

Okalana
Queen Okalana was a character played by actress Anne Revere in the film Rainbow Island (1944).

Ola
Ola Humphrey was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s. She was born in California in 1874. Her birth name was Pearl Ola Jane Humphrey. Ola was also a character played by actress Lucy Fox in the film What Fools Men Are (1922).

  • Usage of the baby name Ola.

Olago
Olago was a character played by actress Sarah Padden in the film Man of Two Worlds (1934).

Olala
Olala Ussan was a character played by actress Billie Dove in the film The Thrill Chaser (1923).

Olalla
Olalla was a character name in the films The Wandering Jew (1923) and The Wandering Jew (1933), both of which were based upon the same stage play.

O-Lan
O-Lan was a character played by actress Luise Rainer in the film The Good Earth (1937), which was based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning book of the same name by Pearl S. Buck. Rainer won the Academy Award for Best Actress in 1937 for playing O-Lan.

Olana
Olana was a character played by actress Marie Walcamp in the short film Olana of the South Seas (1914).

  • Usage of the baby name Olana.

Oleander
Oleander Tubbs was a character played by actress Helen Chandler in the film Mr. Boggs Steps Out (1938).

Olette
Olette was a character played by actress Peggy Hyland in the film The Sixteenth Wife (1917).

Olivetta
Olivetta was a character name in multiple films, including The Long Arm of the Law (short, 1911) and 13 Washington Square (1928).

Olivette
Olivette was a character played by actress Olive Borden in the film The Monkey Talks (1927).

Ollante
Ollante was a character played by actress Dorothy Dalton in the film The Jungle Child (1916).

Olympe
Olympe Bradna was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1940s. She was born in France in 1920. Her birth name was Antoinette Olympe Bradna. Olympe was also a character name in multiple films, including New Lives for Old (1925) and Camille (1936).

Oma
Oma Tuthill was a character played by actress Mayre Hall in the film The Battle of Ballots (1915).

  • Usage of the baby name Oma.

Ona
Ona Munson was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1950s. She was born in Oregon in 1903. Her birth name was Owena Elizabeth Wolcott. Ona was also a character played by actress Gail Kane in the film The Jungle (1914).

  • Usage of the baby name Ona.

Onda
Onda was a character played by actress Marie Walcamp in the short film Onda of the Orient (1916).

  • Usage of the baby name Onda.

Oneta
Oneta was a character played by actress Anna May Wong in the film The Desert’s Toll (1926).

  • Usage of the baby name Oneta.

Opitsah
Opitsah was a character played by actress Bessie Eyton in the short film Opitsah: Apache for Sweetheart (1912). Despite the title, the word opitsah isn’t Apache — it’s Chinook Jargon for “knife,” but it can also denote a “lover” or “sweetheart.”

Ora
Ora Carew was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in Utah in 1893. Ora was also a character name in multiple films, including Sparrow of the Circus (short, 1914) and Her Supreme Sacrifice (short, 1915).

  • Usage of the baby name Ora.

Orchid
Orchid was a character name in multiple films, including Fine Manners (1926), starring Gloria Swanson, and Gangs of New York (1938).

  • Usage of the baby name Orchid (which debuted in the data in 1926).

Oriole
Oriole Hartley was a character played by actress Nanci Price in the film The Girl in the Show (1929).

  • Usage of the baby name Oriole.

Orlean
Orlean was a character played by actress Evelyn Preer in the film The Homesteader (1919).

  • Usage of the baby name Orlean.

Ormi
Ormi Hawley was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s. She was born in Massachusetts in 1889. Her birth name was Ormetta Grace Hawley.

  • Usage of the baby name Ormi (which debuted in the data in 1916).

Orry
Orry Baxter was a character played by actress Jane Wyman in the film The Yearling (1946).

  • Usage of the baby name Orry.

Osa
Osa Massen was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1950s. She was born in Denmark in 1914. Her birth name was Aase Iverson Madsen.

  • Usage of the baby name Osa.

Osprey
Osprey Bacchus was a character played by actress Helen Jerome Eddy in the film A Very Good Young Man (1919).

Ottilie
Ottilie Van Zandt was a character played by actress Ethel Shannon in the film Maytime (1923).

Ottima
Ottima was a character played by actress Marion Leonard in the short film Pippa Passes; or, The Song of Conscience (1909).

Ottola
Ottola Nesmith was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1960s. She was born in Washington, D.C., in 1889. She was named after her father, Capt. Otto Nesmith.

Ouida
Ouida Bergère was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s. She was born in 1886. Her birth name was Eunie Branch. The name Ouida was invented by English author Ouida (b. 1839), whose birth name was Marie Louise Ramé.

  • Usage of the baby name Ouida.

Oulaid
Oulaid was a character played by actress Mary Alden in the film The Tents of Allah (1923).

Ozma
Ozma was a character name in multiple films, including The Fairylogue and Radio-Plays (1908) and The Patchwork Girl of Oz (1914).

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…Which of the above names do you like best?

Source: IMDb

Popular and Unique Baby Names in Iowa, 2016

I love that the Social Security Administration releases so much baby name data to the public. But I’ve always had mixed feelings about that 5-baby threshold for inclusion. (Due to privacy concerns, the government doesn’t release names given to fewer than 5 babies per gender, per year.)

Part of me appreciates the threshold. For instance, I like that it adds significance to the pop culture debut names I’m always posting about, as these names had to hit a certain minimum level of usage in order to register in the data.

But the other part of me? The other part just really, really wants to see those rare/crazy names at the bottom of the list.

So I get excited when I find U.S. data from an official source that does go down to single-instance usage. Up until recently, I only knew about Sonoma County and Los Angeles County, but recently I discovered that Iowa (an entire state!) also releases down-to-1 baby name data. Yay!

But before we get to the rare names, let’s look at the state of Iowa’s top baby names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Olivia, 203 baby girls
2. Emma, 181
3. Charlotte, 158
4. Harper, 156
5. Ava & Evelyn, 148 each (2-way tie)
6. Amelia, 125
7. Nora, 123
8. Sophia, 112
9. Addison, 101
10. Grace, 96

Boy Names
1. Oliver, 197 baby boys
2. Owen, 178
3. William, 174
4. Wyatt, 170
5. Henry, 165
6. Liam, 159
7. Noah, 149
8. Benjamin, 148
9. Jackson, 144
10. Lincoln, 123

  • In the girls’ top 10, Addison and Grace replace Avery.
  • In the boys’ top 10, Benjamin and Lincoln replace Mason and Elijah.
  • In 2015, the top two names were Emma and Liam.

(The SSA rankings for Iowa are similar, but not exactly the same. One notable difference on is that the SSA ranks Grayson 10th on the boys list, and puts Lincoln down in 13th.)

And now for the rarities!

Iowa’s website offers interactive baby name usage graphs that include all names bestowed at least once from 2000 to 2016. Here’s a sampling:

Rare baby names in Iowa (2000-2016 total usage)
Girl Names Boy Names
Arabia (1)
Bishop (1)
Currency (1)
Dream (3)
Eros (1)
Fairy (1)
Gatsby (1)
Heritage (1)
Irish (5)
Jasper (1)
KeyEssence (1)
Lisbon (1)
Michigan (1)
Nirvana (3)
Orchid (1)
PairoDice (1)
Qy (1)
Reminisce (1)
Scully (1)
Tear (1)
Unity (4)
Veruca (1)
Windy (2)
Xanadu (1)
Yawh (1)
Zinnia (1)
Arcade (1)
Banksy (1)
Cactus (1)
Denali (2)
Elvis (18)
Fonzy (1)
Galaxy (1)
Helium (1)
Indigo (2)
Jeep (3)
Kal-El (3)
Lightning (1)
Mowgli (1)
Notorious (1)
Opttimus (1)
Player (1)
Quest (3)
Racer (3)
Sanctify (1)
Tavern (1)
Universe (1)
Vegas (1)
Winner (4)
Xyn (1)
Young-Sky (1)
Zealand (1)

If you decide to dig through the data, leave a comment and let me know what you spot!

And if you’re friends with any expectant parents in Iowa, tell those lucky ducks that they have access to full sets of baby name rankings for their state. Either send them a link to this post or to one of the pages below…

Sources: Top Baby Names – Iowa Department of Public Health, Baby Names Popularity Over Time – Iowa Department of Public Health

Do You Name Your Orchids?

orchid

Hubs and I went to a baseball game on Friday night, and one of the women sitting behind us spent time talking with her friends about the orchid in her office. And you know what? That orchid had a name: Octavia. The woman went on to say that she knew of another office orchid with a name (Desdemona) and that she thought all orchids deserved names because they’re so hard to take care of.

(I swear I’m not a creepy eavesdropper. I couldn’t help but overhear this stuff.)

Giving names to plants is nothing new, but her last point made me wonder if people are more likely to give names to finicky orchids than to plants that don’t take as much effort to grow.

Have you been introduced to any named orchids lately? More importantly, what name would you give an orchid?

P.S. In terms of baby names, both Orchid and the Spanish version Orquidea remain rare in the U.S. The fact that they stem from the Greek word for “testicle” (orkhis) could have something do with it.

P.P.S. The man-eating plant named Audrey in The Little Shop of Horrors may have been inspired by a man-eating orchid from a 1950s Arthur C. Clarke story, which in turn may have been inspired by an man-eating orchid from a 1890s H.G. Wells story. Disappointingly, neither of these two carnivorous orchids had names.