How popular is the baby name Pablo in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Pablo.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Pablo


Posts that Mention the Name Pablo

Popular Baby Names in Spain, 2019

According to Spain’s Instituto Nacional de Estadistica, the most popular baby names in the country in 2019 were (again) Lucia and Hugo.

Here are Spain’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2019:

Girl Names

  1. Lucia, 3,621 baby girls
  2. Sofia, 3,505
  3. Martina, 3,172
  4. Maria, 3,165
  5. Julia, 2,600
  6. Paula, 2,498
  7. Emma, 2,362
  8. Daniela, 2,315
  9. Valeria, 2,248
  10. Alba, 2,097

Boy Names

  1. Hugo, 3,536 baby boys
  2. Martin, 3,256
  3. Lucas, 3,185
  4. Mateo, 3,160
  5. Leo, 2,960
  6. Daniel, 2,958
  7. Alejandro, 2,937
  8. Pablo, 2,868
  9. Manuel, 2,460
  10. Alvaro, 2,279

Both top 10 lists include the same 10 names as the year before, but in a different order.

The top names in the Basque Country specifically were Ane and Markel. (Ane is a form of Anna, whereas Markel comes from the Roman name Martialis.)

And did you know that Spain has two autonomous cities on the coast of Africa? They’re Melilla and Ceuta. The top names in Melilla were Amira/Nour (tie) and Mohamed, while the top names in Ceuta were Yasmin and Amir/Mohamed (tie).

Sources: First name of newborns – INEbase, Markel – Behind the Name

Name Quotes 88: Booker, Beyoncé, Beatrice

From an interview with Beyoncé’s mother Tina Knowles-Lawson — the youngest of seven siblings — on the podcast In My Head:

A lot of people don’t know that Beyoncé is my last name. It’s my maiden name. My name was Celestine Beyoncé, which, at that time, was not a cool thing, to have that weird name.

[…]

But, all of us have a different spelling. I think me and my brother, Skip, were the only two that had B-E-Y-O-N-C-E.

And, it’s interesting — and it shows you the times — because we asked my mother when I was grown, I was like, ‘Why is my brother’s name spelled B-E-Y-I-N-C-E?’

[…]

[M]y mom’s reply to me was like, ‘That’s what they put on your birth certificate.’

So I said, ‘Well, why didn’t you argue and make them correct it?’

She said, ‘I did one time, the first time, and I was told: ‘Be happy that you’re getting a birth certificate.” Because, at one time, Black people didn’t get birth certificates. They didn’t even have a birth certificate. Because it meant that you really didn’t exist, you know, you weren’t important. It was that subliminal message.

And so I understood that that must have been horrible for her, not to even be able to have her children’s names spelled correctly.

So it was an odd name, it was a weird name, and they were like, ‘How dare you have a French name.’ Like, ‘We’re gonna screw this up real good for you.’ And that’s what they did. So we all have different spellings.

From an Express article that reveals the Queen’s preference for the name Beatrice over the name Annabel:

The names of royal babies are traditionally approved by the Queen. But the monarch is said to have rejected the Duke and Duchess of York’s choice of Annabel for their first child.

The Queen found Annabel too “yuppie”, The Sun reported, and instead suggested Beatrice.

The name Beatrice was royal enough for the head of state but unusual enough to please Sarah, according to the newspaper.

Two quotes from an article in which the author argues that distinctively black names in America emerged long before the civil rights movement:

[I]n the 1920 census, 99% of all men with the first name of Booker were black, as were 80% of all men named Perlie or its variations. We found that the fraction of blacks holding a distinctively black name in the early 1900s is comparable to the fraction holding a distinctively black name at the end of the 20th century, around 3%.

…and second:

[W]e found that names like Alonzo, Israel, Presley and Titus were popular both before and after emancipation among blacks. We also learned found that roughly 3% of black Americans had black names in the antebellum period – about the same percentage as did in the period after the Civil War.

But what was most striking is the trend over time during enslavement. We found that the share of black Americans with black names increased over the antebellum era while the share of white Americans with these same names declined, from more than 3% at the time of the American Revolution to less than 1% by 1860.

From an article in Time about middle names:

Middle names provide an opportunity for people to shift identities throughout their life: the author George Sand wrote that her mother, who had “three baptismal names,” used each of them at various points throughout her life. Pablo Picasso was baptized with a string of more than a dozen names and though, like many people with multiple names, he wasn’t known by all of them, he did test out different combinations: initially signing paintings as P. Ruiz, then trying P. Ruiz Picasso before sticking with Picasso.

From the 2004 book Uqalurait: An Oral History of Nunavut:

Three essential parts made a human in the Inuit view: body, soul, and name. A nameless child was not fully human; giving it a name, whether before or after birth, made it whole. Inuit did not have family surnames. Instead, each person’s name linked him or her to a deceased relative or family friend.

[…]

Is this reincarnation? Elders point out that it is not, for it is not the soul, but rather the spiritual element that is the name — the name-soul — that joins the child, remaining with him and protecting him throughout his life.

(The word in the book’s title, uqalurait, refers to a type of snowdrift with a tip that resembles a tongue (uqaq). It’s a pun because the word for “tongue” in inuttitut (the Canadian dialect of inuktitut) is also the word for “language” — very fitting for a book of oral history.)

From a Bon Appetit article about a particular dijon mustard product:

I mostly love Rich Country because…it’s called Rich Country, which I’m sure you’ll agree is a pretty unnecessarily epic name for a condiment. It sounds like the next great Rick Ross album. Or a Keith Urban-themed Southern waterpark. Or a new bourbon endorsed by a retired pro-wrestler. But it’s not! It’s mustard. And it’s helped to clarify for me that I want my condiments to do more than simply enhance the taste of food I’m preparing—I want them to enhance my life, to spark joy every time I pull them out of the fridge. Indeed, every time I reach for my new favorite mustard, I can’t help but whisper the name aloud as if I were starring in a commercial for it—R-r-r-r-iiiiiiich Coooooountry—and laugh out loud while I’m making lunch. (This could be the quarantine brain talking, but still. It’s the little things, people.)

(Speaking of dijon mustard…)

For more name-related quotes, check out the name quotes category.

Popular Baby Names in Spain, 2018

According to Spain’s Instituto Nacional de Estadistica, the most popular baby names in the country in 2018 were Lucia and Hugo.

Here are Spain’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2018:

Girl Names

  1. Lucia, 4,004 baby girls
  2. Sofia, 3,701
  3. Martina, 3,534
  4. Maria, 3,533
  5. Paula, 2,847
  6. Julia, 2,738
  7. Emma, 2,623
  8. Valeria, 2,520
  9. Daniela, 2,503
  10. Alba, 2,350

Boy Names

  1. Hugo, 3,800 baby boys
  2. Lucas, 3,617
  3. Martin, 3,332
  4. Daniel, 3,223
  5. Pablo, 3,139
  6. Mateo, 3,100
  7. Alejandro, 3,000
  8. Leo, 2,651
  9. Alvaro, 2,495
  10. Manuel, 2,476

In the boys’ top 10, Leo replaces Adrian.

The girls’ top 10 includes the same names, but in a different order.

In 2017, the top names were Lucia and Lucas.

Source: What is the frequency of a first name of newborns? – INEbase

Popular Baby Names in Spain, 2017

According to Spain’s Instituto Nacional de Estadistica, the most popular baby names in the country in 2017 were Lucia and Lucas.

Here are Spain’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2017:

Girl Names
1. Lucia, 4,410 baby girls
2. Sofia, 4,206
3. Maria, 3,874
4. Martina, 3,814
5. Paula, 3,085
6. Julia, 2,998
7. Daniela, 2,959
8. Valeria, 2,856
9. Alba, 2,678
10. Emma, 2,525

Boy Names
1. Lucas, 4,209 baby boys
2. Hugo, 4,141
3. Martin, 3,838
4. Daniel, 3,717
5. Pablo, 3,426
6. Alejandro, 3,220
7. Mateo, 3,124
8. Adrian, 2,841
9. Alvaro, 2,794
10. Manuel, 2,517

Lucas replaces Hugo as Spain’s #1 boy name.

In the boys’ top 10, Manuel replaces David.

In the girls’ top 10, Emma replaces Noa.

Finally, here are the 2016 rankings.

Sources: Nombres de los recién nacidos – INEbase, Lucía and Lucas, the most popular baby names in Spain in 2017

Name Quotes #54: Roella, Rumi, Tsh

splash, movie, quote, quotation, madison, 1980s

From the 1984 movie Splash, the character Allen (Tom Hanks) talking with his then-nameless lady friend (Daryl Hannah) as they walk around NYC:

Woman: “What are English names?”

Allen: “Well, there’s millions of them, I guess. Jennifer, Joanie, Hilary. (Careful, hey, those are hot!) See names, names… Linda, Kim– (Where are we? Madison.) Uh, Elizabeth, Samantha–”

Woman: “Madison…I like Madison!”

Allen: “Madison’s not a name… Well, all right, ok, Madison it is. Good thing we weren’t at 149th Street.”

Jay-Z on the names of his twins, Rumi and Sir, from a recent Rap Radar interview (via People):

“Rumi is our favorite poet, so it was for our daughter,” he shared. “Sir was like, man, come out the gate. He carries himself like that. He just came out, like, Sir.”

From a 2016 interview with Cheap Trick’s Robin Zander in the Tampa Bay Times:

In the early ’90s, he and wife, Pam, who grew up in Pinellas County, settled down in the Sunshine State, drawn by family ties and the promise of a nice, safe community in which to raise their son, Robin Taylor, now 23, and daughter, Robin-Sailor, 15. (Zander’s go-to line about his kids’ quirky names: “My wife just calls us Robin, and we all come running.”)

From a 2009 review of the book Looking In, about photographer Robert Frank:

On November 7 1955, part-way through a two-year, Guggenheim-funded voyage around America, the photographer Robert Frank was arrested by Arkansas state police who suspected he was a communist. Their reasons: he was a shabbily dressed foreigner, he was Jewish, he had letters of reference from people with Russian-sounding names, he had photographed the Ford plant, possessed foreign whisky and his children had foreign names (Pablo and Andrea).

From an article called This Is The Biggest Influence On Baby Names:

[Neil] Burdess says most parents’ baby-name decisions are shaped by affluent, highly educated families who live near them, rather than prominent figures in pop culture.

[…]

He cites research conducted in California in the 1960s, which found that names adopted by high-income, highly educated parents are soon embraced by those lower down the socioeconomic ladder.

From a 2015 obituary of movie star Rex Reason:

Contrary to what one might think, Rex Reason was his birth name, not one dreamed up by a Hollywood executive. Universal Pictures, in fact, had billed him as “Bart Roberts” in a couple of films before he insisted on being credited with his real name.

From a 1998 obituary of surfer Rell Sunn:

There seemed to be a bit of destiny attached. Her middle name, Ka-polioka’ehukai, means Heart of the Sea.

“Most Hawaiian grandparents name you before you’re born,” she says. “They have a dream or something that tells them what the name will be.” Hawaiians also have a knack for giving people rhythmic, dead-on nicknames, and for young Rell they had a beauty: Rella Propella.

“My godmother called me that because I was always moving so fast,” says Rell. “To this day, people think my real name is Rella. Actually I was born Roella, a combination of my parents’ names: Roen and Elbert. But I hated it, and no one used it, so I changed it to Rell.”

From a blog post by Jason Fisher on naming practices in Nigeria:

When [Kelechi Eke] was born, his mother experienced dangerous complications, which his parents acknowledged in his naming. In Igbo, Kelechi means “thank God”, and Eke means “creation”. The usual Igbo name for God, Chineke, means literally, “God of Creation”, and you can see both elements (chi + eke) in his two names. When K.C.’s own son was born, it was in the wake of difficulties in bringing his wife to the United States; consequently, they chose the name Oluchi, meaning “God’s work”, suggesting their gratitude that the immigration problems were resolved before his mother went into labor.

From the about page of writer Tsh Oxenreider:

My name is Tsh Oxenreider, and no, my name is not a typo (one of the first things people ask). It’s pronounced “Tish.” No reason, really, except that my parents were experimental with their names choices in the 70s. Until my younger brother was born in the 80s, whom they named Josh, quite possibly one of the most common names for people his age. Who knows what they were thinking, really.

Want to see more quotes about names? Check out the name quotes category.