How popular is the baby name Patience in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Patience and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Patience.

The graph will take a few seconds to load, thanks for your patience. (Don't worry, it shouldn't take nine months.) If it's taking too long, try reloading the page.

Popularity of the Baby Name Patience

Number of Babies Named Patience

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Patience

The Baby Named Federal Constitution

Jonathan and Patience Sprague of Douglas, Massachusetts, welcomed a baby boy on October 16, 1790.

They named him Federal Constitution Sprague.


Well, he was born a year after the U.S. Constitution went into effect. (It had been was created in 1787 and ratified in 1788.)

Federal Constitution

As one source put it, “Federal Constitution Sprague evidently had a father to whom the new nation meant something. He was interested evidently in the document for which he named his son.”

Yes, evidently. :)

None of Federal Constitution’s 13 siblings, nine full siblings and four half-siblings, got a name as notable (or as patriotic) as his:

  1. Sarah
  2. Nehemiah
  3. Mercy
  4. Federal Constitution
  5. Amy
  6. Daniel
  7. Preserved
  8. Lee
  9. Patience
  10. Jonathan, Jr.
  11. Almira
  12. Philinda
  13. Elias
  14. Emeline

F.C. ended up having a dozen children, ten from his first marriage and two from his second, but didn’t pass his unique name down to any of them:

  1. Amy
  2. Edward
  3. Nathan
  4. William
  5. Lafayette
  6. Betsey
  7. James
  8. Philander (twin)
  9. Philinda (twin)
  10. Elias
  11. Newton
  12. Della

I’ve also found a handful of other people named Constitution (or some variation thereof). Most were born in France in the 1790s, around the time France adopted several new constitutions during the French Revolution. Several other Constitutions were from countries in South America. One was born in New South Wales in 1855, the year of the New South Wales Constitution Act.


  • Crane, Ellery Bicknell. Historic homes and institutions and genealogical and personal memoirs of Worcester County Massachusetts. New York: Lewis Publishing Company, 1907.
  • Sprague, Augustus B. R. Genealogy in part of the Sprague Families in America. Worcester, MA: Augustus B. R. Sprague, 1902.


Names from Bones – Seeley and Temperance

I recently read something about the TV show Bones, which has been on the air since 2005. I’ve never seen the show, but the first names of the main characters, Seeley (male) and Temperance (female), piqued my curiosity. Has Bones been inspiring parents to use these names for their babies?

Yup, it would seem so.

Here are the numbers for Seeley since 2005:

  • 2005 – (unlisted)
  • 2006 – (unlisted)
  • 2007 – 7 baby girls named Seeley
  • 2008 – (unlisted)
  • 2009 – 10 baby boys and 8 baby girls named Seeley
  • 2010 – 34 baby boys and 9 baby girls named Seeley

And here are the numbers for Temperance:

  • 2005 – 8 baby girls named Temperance
  • 2006 – 20 baby girls named Temperance
  • 2007 – 76 baby girls named Temperance
  • 2008 – 88 baby girls named Temperance
  • 2009 – 165 baby girls named Temperance
  • 2010 – 211 baby girls named Temperance (rank: 1,148th)

I’m really surprised by Temperance. Short virtue names like Faith, Grace, Hope and Joy are alive and well, but most of the long virtue names — especially those like Temperance — are long gone. Abstinence, Experience, Deliverance, Diligence, Innocence, Obedience, Perseverance, Providence, Reliance, Repentance, Silence…only Patience, Constance and Prudence are still around. And now Temperance might be coming back.

How do you feel about this? Do you like the name Temperance? Do you think it’ll crack the top 1,000?

Names Needed for Twin Baby Girls

A reader named Grace would like some help naming her twin girls, due in a couple of months. She and her husband John already have three boys, Jackson, Samuel and Lucas.

So far, their favorite girl names are Juliet, Isla, Susannah and Norah. But they’re also considering a family name:

We would love to honor my mother, Denise Marie, but we despise both names. I would love some ideas on how to use that without actually using those names.

For the middle spots, they’re aiming for virtue names. They already have Honor picked out, and “[i]f there is another virtue name you would suggest so they both had one that would be great!”

Their last name is similar to Cawston.

On the current favorites…
I like all of the current favorites. The pairing I like best, though, is Juliet and Susannah. I just think they sound good together. I also like how they can both be shortened, just like the boys’ names — Jack, Sam, Luke, Jules & Sue (or Julie & Susie).

On incorporating Denise Marie…
One way to incorporate Denise Marie would be to find a name that features the sounds of both Denise and Marie (especially those D- and M-sounds). Names with these sounds include Madeline, Demetria, Dominique/Domenica, Damaris, Adamina, Amadea and Idamae.

Another approach would be to use initials — either the initials “D. M.” for one twin or a D-name for twin #1 and an M-name for twin #2. Some possibilities (beyond the names above) include Dahlia, Daisy, Damiana, Daphne, Dara, Delphine, Diana, Dina, Dora, Dorothy and Drusilla for D-names and Mara, Marian, Marlene, Martina, Mina, Mirabelle, Miranda, Miriam, Molly, Monica and Mona for M-names.

On virtuous middles…
My first thought was Mercy, because it sounds a lot like Marie. Other virtue names that might make nice middles are Amity, Charity, Clementine/Clemency, Hope, Joy, Patience, Peace/Pax, Temperance and Verity.

Now it’s your turn! Which of Juliet, Isla, Susannah and Norah do you like best for twins? What names can you come up with to honor Denise Marie? Which virtue names do you like best for middle names?

Baby Names (No Longer) Needed – Molly, Kaitlin, Joshua, Isabel

We’re batting .500 for March:

  • Elisa picked Kaitlin Isabella,
  • Teresa opted for Molly Brynn,
  • Sheryl chose Joshua Stephen, and
  • Erin selected Isabel Robin.

No word yet from Sarah, Tamara, Liz or Patience.

And, I always forget to mention this: Thank you to everyone who takes the time comment on the “Baby Name Needed” posts! Your suggestions and ideas are often far better than mine. :) You guys rock.

Baby Name Needed – Middle Name for Elle

Patience and her husband are expecting a baby girl in June. They plan to name her Elle, but they’re having a tough time choosing a middle name:

My maiden name is Lewis, and my husband’s middle name is Louis. […] I don’t like Louise…but it would be cool to play on the similarity of our names for her middle name. Then again I don’t know how I feel about: Elle L. Wagner.

(Their real surname isn’t Wagner, but it does start with a W and have two syllables.)

I’m not too sure about “Elle L.” either. Putting a name and a letter that sound exactly alike side-by-side will probably cause a lot of confusion. Also, Elle followed by any L-name is going to be tricky to say aloud.

Unfortunately, though, many Louis-derived female names start with L. Most of those that don’t (e.g. Clovia, Aloysia) are fairly exotic. The only two I’d consider are Gia and Gina, which are distant cousins of Louis via the Italian Luigia.

A compound name might work. Marylou, Marylouisa, Annalou, Annalouisa…any short-ish name could be the first element, and a Louis-based name could be the second. Length would be an issue, but Elle is quite short, so I think a longer middle wouldn’t be too much of a burden.

The only other idea I had was to look at names that have consonants in common with Lewis and Louis, such as:


None of the above are in the Louis family, but they could be seen as “tribute” names in a sense.

What other ideas would guys offer to Patience?

How Do You Feel About Your Name, Patience?

“I’m the only member of my family with a really different name,” says Patience, who is in her early 30s and lives in the southwestern United States.

“From age 6 to age 16, I hated my name,” she says. “It was a terribly loaded name when I was a kid in school — as if teachers expected me to embody the virtue.”

As a kid, Patience frequently heard lame puns like:

“Are you patient, Patience?”


“Patience, have patience.”

Later on, though, things got better. “I really enjoy my name now for the most part,” she says.

Still, she would caution parents considering the name: “They need to understand just how many puns and jokes [their daughter will] have to sit through.”

She suggests that parents who want to use a “highly individual first name” stick with a run-of-the-mill middle name. That way, their child “can use the middle name during the ‘teasing years’ and then revert back to the first name in adulthood, when it’s positive and sticks in people’s minds.”

Thank you, Patience!