How popular is the baby name Pearlie in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Pearlie and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Pearlie.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Pearlie

Number of Babies Named Pearlie

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Pearlie

100 Years Ago, Were Black Names Beneficial?

© Cook, Logan, and Parman
© Cook, Logan, and Parman

In generations past, was it advantageous for a black man to have a distinctively black name?

Yes, according to a study published recently in the journal Explorations in Economic History.

Researchers Lisa D. Cook, Trevon D. Logan, and John M. Parmanc analyzed over 3 million death certificates from Alabama, Illinois, Missouri and North Carolina from 1802 to 1970. They looked specifically at the life expectancy of men with the following distinctively black names:

  • Abe, Abraham
  • Alonzo
  • Ambrose
  • Booker
  • Elijah
  • Freeman
  • Isaac
  • Isaiah
  • Israel
  • King
  • Master
  • Moses
  • Percy
  • Perlie, Purlie, Pearlie
  • Presley, Presly
  • Prince
  • Titus

What did they find?

That black men with these names lived more than a full year longer (on average) than other black men. In fact, according to the abstract, “[a]s much as 10% of the historical between-race mortality gap would have been closed if every black man was given a black name.”

So what’s behind this beneficial effect?

It’s hard to say, but Lisa D. Cook believes that the black men with Biblical names specifically could have been “held to a higher standard in academic and other activities […] and had stronger family, church or community ties,” and that this could have played a part in their relative longevity.

Studies of modern black names, in contrast, regularly find that such names are a hindrance in the workplace, in academia, etc. My most recent post about this is: Men with “Black” Names Seen as Aggressive, Low Status.

Sources: What’s in a name? In some cases, longer life, The mortality consequences of distinctively black names (abstract)


More Babies Named Halloween

pumpkinsDozens of U.S. babies have been named Halloween over the years. We’ve already talked about Halloween Putman. Who are some of the others?

The earliest example I know of is Halloween Hovey. She was 8 months old and living in Michigan at the time of the 1870 census. (North America has only been celebrating Halloween since the mid-1800s, btw.)

The latest example I know of is Halloween Starks. She was born in Florida on Oct. 3, 1952.

Probably my favorite example is Halloween Baggs, whose name reminds me of bags of candy. :) He was 9 and living in Indiana at the time of the 1920 census.

Also memorable is Marigold Halloween Pearlie Cummings. She was born in Hawaii on Oct. 31, 1922.

I even found two people who spelled Halloween with the apostrophe: Henry Hallowe’en Varner (boy, born in Massachusetts on Oct. 31, 1904) and Tommie Hallowe’en Farmer (girl, born in Texas on Oct. 31, 1921)

Have you ever met anyone named Halloween? (If so, did they like their name?)